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Thread: 5 Favorite Recordings?

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    Senior Member linz's Avatar
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    Default 5 Favorite Recordings?

    1. Liszt's Mephisto Waltz no.1 (orchestral version) Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic, {circa 70's}

    2. Wagner's Tristan und Isolde Furtwangler, Flagstad, Philharmonia Orchestra

    3. Mozart's Die Zauberflote, Otto Klemperer, Lucia Popp (Queen of the Night)

    4. Mahler's 5th Bernstein, Vienna Philharmonic, {circa 80's}

    5. Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, Gregiev, Vienna Philharmonic, (new recording!)

    P.S. Ordered Der Rosenkavalier/Bohm/Dresden, excited to get it in the mail soon!

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    1. Beethoven S5/7 Carlos Kleiber VPO
    2. Schumann S1-4, Sawallisch, Staatskapelle
    3. Berlioz Sym Fantastique, Tilson Thomas, San Francisco
    4. Schumann, Dichterliebe, Fritz Wunderlich
    5. Bartok, Concerto for Orchestra, Reiner, Chicago SO


    N.B. Subject to change at the drop of a hat!
    Last edited by Topaz; Nov-30-2006 at 23:33.

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    Senior Member linz's Avatar
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    I myself own Klieber, 5th and 7th, and it is incredible. There is also Mahler's 5th/Inbal/Frankfurt RSO, Berlioz/Beecham/Symphonie Fantastique/'(EMI) Great Recordings of the Century', and Bruckner's 5th/Wand/NDRSO/'89.

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    I think most of the EMI "Great Recordings of the Century" are worth considering. Each one I have bought has always been a winner. There is a very good orchestra and conductor and performer, and the sound quality is excellent given that many of the recordings are quite old (back to 50s ans 60s in some cases)

    I also like the DG label. I have never yet bought a duff CD on the DG label.

    Regards the Carlos Kleiber Beethoven Symph 5/7, I bought it because I had seen such marvellous reviews of it. Even though I already had 4 recordings of the 5th, I bought it and was astonished. It's perfect in all respects. Excellent Xmas present.

    The Fritz Wunderlich (tenor) CD referred to in my post above is excellent. It contains some famous Beethoven and Schubert songs like Adelaide and An Silvia respectively, as well as Shumann's very famous Dichterliebe (a song cycle). In sound quality it's an excellent CD and a superb introduction to the world of "lieder". For anyone not too sure about it, it's where piano and voice have equal weight. It's not heavy stuff by any means, just the contrary: simple songs. The lieder on this CD are all in German but there's a translation if you need it. Wunderlich was very famous in his day but died many years ago after an accident; his voice is superb for this type of music.


    Topaz
    Last edited by Topaz; Dec-02-2006 at 23:37.

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    Senior Member linz's Avatar
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    When I first started listening to Classical at 15 years old, I only bought Duetsche Grammaphone. The reason was, when you line them up on a shelf, in alphebetical order by composer, it looks so 'O.C.D.' friendly!

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    1. Grieg and Schumann Piano Concertos (EMI) - Soloist Dinu Lipatti (mono).

    Totally amazing performances. We may all have heard the Grieg concerto a hundred times but NOT till you hear Lipatti's cadenza at the end of the 1st movement. Astounding artistry. And, as for Lipatti's Schumann recording - well, put it this way - that recording is more than 50 years old and it's in mono. It's astounding for a million reasons.

    2. Ralph Vaughan Williams - 'Serenade to Music' (for Vocal Soloists and Orchestra). Adrian Boult. - A masterpiece in every way and this recording never bettered.

    3. Mozart Piano Concertos 20 and 21 - Soloist, Friedrich Gulda - DG - No words to convey its greatness.

    4. Beethoven Symphony No. 7 - DG - Conductor Carlos Kleiber - Stunning !

    5. Mozart - Divertimenti KV136-8 - Academy of St Martin in the Fields - Neville Marriner

    Perhaps the finest ever chamber orchestra performances I've ever heard for a single disc.

    (We might haggle about who actually wrote these 'Mozart' works but the music itself is often sublime).

    And as a possible encore -

    Mendelssohn and Tchaikowsky Violin Concertos - Soloist, Jascha Heifetz - RCA

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    Junior Member Shane's Avatar
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    Not my "ultimate" list, but some of my top contenders:

    1. Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto No. 2/Sviatoslav Richter/DG
    2. Beethoven - Complete Piano Sonatas/Richard Goode/Nonesuch
    3. Bach - Goldberg Variations/Andras Schiff/EMC
    4. John Williams/Music of Barrios/Sony
    5. Shostakovich - Complete String Quartets/Emerson Quartet/DG

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    Junior Member Odocoileus's Avatar
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    1 Gorecki Symphony 3
    2 Copland Appalachian Spring
    3 Beethoven Symphony 7
    4 Beethoven Symphony 9
    5 Rodrigo Concierto de Aranjuez

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    Senior Member Kurkikohtaus's Avatar
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    An incredible recording of an oft badly recorded piece is the Cleveland Orchestra conducted by Pierre Boulez playing Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. The exactness found here is to be expected from Boulez, but what I find particularily refreshing is the precise respect given to Stravinsky's original metronome markings. That said, it is the slowest recording I've ever heard of this piece, as most conductors do it much faster than Stravinsky wrote.

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    Senior Member linz's Avatar
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    1992 DG, Boulez looks great with that comb-over doesn't he? This was my absolute favorite recording of any work, for much of my youth. His mechanical as opposed to romantic interpretation of the music is first class. I especially loved the emaculate drums of 'Glorification of the Chosen Victim' and 'Sacrificial Dance'. I do believe this is the best preformane of the work ever! (* * * * *)

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    Senior Member Kurkikohtaus's Avatar
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    A little "aside" for the Boulez / Rite / Cleveland recording:

    My first reaction to the Danse Sacrale section that ends the piece was that it must be way too slow. So I "clocked" the tempo using a special "tap-in" feature that my digital metronome has... and was astonished to find that it was exactly 16th note = 126, which is what Stravinsky prescribes.

    This tempo leads to another interesting point:

    The Danse Sacrale when done faster, as it usually is, becomes somewhat acrobatic for the conductor. Indeed, it appears in the final round of many conducting competitions. When the 8th note is taken as the basic unit of pulse, the conducting becomes very "jagged", in that bars that are written (for example) 5/16 are conducted in 2, with on waltz-like dotted-eight beat and then a regular 8th beat. As the meters change every bar, the actual beating becomes extremely complicated, as the conductor must keep extremely careful track of when to show the dotted-eighth beat and when to show the regular one. But at Stravinsky's prescribed 16th=126, it is very feasible and comfortable to conduct 16th notes. The meters still change from bar to bar, but the conductor must then only keep track of how many 16ths are in each bar but doesn't have to worry about the type of beat he is showing, because the beats are all 16th notes and all stay the same size/style.

    Boulez is definitely conducting 16th notes here, I've seen him conduct (once live and once on a video) and I can very definitely picture what he looks like in this closing passage. Also, the orchestra is so tight here, in a way that they simply couldn't be if he were conducting it the "hard way".


    Well, back to the lists!

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    Senior Member linz's Avatar
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    Another fine recording of a contemporary of Stravinsky, Schoenberg/Pierrot Lunaire/Boulez/Schaefer/1998/DG. The compositions themselves were composed within a year or two of each other. (Circa 1910-1912)

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    Senior Member Saturnus's Avatar
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    It's a fact that Boulez is as good conductor as he is a bad composer, and he's extremely bad composer


    My tops:

    1. J. S. Bach; The Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin. John Holloway. (ECM)
    2. R. Schumann; String Quartets no. 1 & 3. Zehetmair Quartet. (ECM)
    3. Francis Poulenc; Complete Chamber music. O. Doise (oboe), A. Tharaud (piano), P. Bernold (flute), L. Levéfre (bassoon) & more. (Naxos)
    4. J. S. Bach; The Brandenburg Concertos. Goebel/Musica Antiqua Köln. (Archiv)
    5. A. Rosetti; 3 Oboe Concertos. Lajos Lencsés (solo), Warchal/Slowak Chamber Orchestra. (cpo)

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    Senior Member oisfetz's Avatar
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    Tchaikovsky's Trio op.50: Gilels,Kogan,Rostropovich live
    Schubert,Cherubini and Mendelssohn SQ,Melos SQ
    Haydn SQ op.50: (first) Tokyo SQ
    LvB last SQ:Yale SQ. Middle SQ:Fine Arts- "Kreutzer":Schneiderhann-Seemann
    Dvorak complete SQ:Prague SQ
    Brahms v.s. 0istrakh-Richter-Bauer-Yampolski Trio op.8:Rubinstein-Heifetz-Feuermann
    Shostakovich SQ first Borodin SA
    Borodin SQ:Borodin
    Taneyev SQ: Taneyev-Krasni SQ

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    Junior Member G e o r g e's Avatar
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    Annie Fischer Beethoven Complete Sonatas

    HvK '62 Beethoven Symphonies

    Borodin String Quartets, Shostakovich, Chandos

    Richter - All his Schubert sonata recordings

    Ashkenazy - Rachmaninov PC 2, 3 - Fistoulari, Kondrashin


    (That was hard, I don't ever want to do that again, and yes, I know I cheated a bit) B)

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