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  1. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing A la Carte series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast January 18, 2019. The following notes are an update .

    The original post, featuring stage music by Grieg, is being “mashed up” into a new programme by adding more stage music by the Norwegian. This A La Carte montage extends our old vinyl share of Vaclav Neumann conducting excerpts Peer Gynt with a rare complete recording of the incidental music from Sigurd Jorsalfar.

    Sigurd Jorsalfar is a play by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson celebrating King Sigurd I of Norway. Published as his Op. 22, his incidental music for the play was first performed in Christiania on 10 April 1872. The full work consists of nine parts; five are purely orchestral, and four are scored for tenor or baritone, male chorus, and orchestra.

    Happy Listeing!

    Edvard GRIEG (1843-1907)
    Peer Gynt, op.23 (Incidental Music, selections)
    Soprano Vocals – Adele Stolte
    Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
    Václav Neumann, conducting
    [VR-18]
    Sigurd Jorsalfar Op. 22 (Incidental Music, complete)
    1. Prelude
    2. Intermezzo (Borghilds Dream) – Act I
    3. In The ing's Hall (The Matching Game) – Act II
    4. Horn Calls – Act II
    5. The Norsmen – Act II
    6. Homage March – Act III
    7. Interlude I & II – Act III
    8. The King's Ballad – Act III
    Baritone Vocals – Kåre Bjørkøy
    Chorus – Oslo Philharmonic Chorus
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Per Dreier, conducting
    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/alc-06
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  2. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast beginning January 17, 2022. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    The original 2011 post from one of our earliest Tuesday Blog series was part of what I called at the time “The Summer of the String Quartet”.

    There are three complete recorded cycles of the 16 Beethoven string quartets by the Budapest Quartet. My favourite is still the set they made for Columbia in the early 1950s, playing the magnificent instruments owned by the Library of Congress. I was pleased to find the complete recordings of the Budapest String Quartet’s 1950’s Beethoven complete corpus of quartets on YouTube, and assembled them for you at the below link:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...yPGgNSHxYFxntU

    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/sq-14-16

    I will issue them in more or less bi-weekly installments starting on January 17, with the final quartets planned for April 25th as part of my Monday series “Lundi avec Ludwig”.

    Happy listening!
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  3. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing Friday series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast January 14, 2022. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Henryk Wieniawski was a polish violinist and composer and one of the most celebrated violinists of the 19th century.

    Wieniawski was a child prodigy who entered the Paris Conservatory at age 8 and graduated from there with the first prize in violin at the unprecedented age of 11. He became a concert violinist at age 13 and began touring Europe with his brother Joseph, a pianist. His wide-ranging concert tours brought him international fame. In 1860 he was appointed violin soloist to the tsar of Russia, and from 1862 to 1869 he taught at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. In 1872–74 he toured the United States, playing with the pianist Anton Rubinstein, and he subsequently taught for a time at the Brussels Conservatory.

    As a violinist Wieniawski was admired for his rich, warm tone, glowing temperament, and perfect technique. His own compositions for violin are Romantic in style and were intended to display his virtuosity. He composed two violin concerti, one in F-sharp Minor (Opus 14) and a quite popular one in D Minor (Opus 22). His other compositions include Le Carnaval russe (Opus 11), Legende (Opus 17), Scherzo-tarantelle (Opus 16), and études, mazurkas, and polonaises.

    The pair of concerti are performed by Michael Rabin; the opening work, Bruch's Scottish Fantasy, was part of a past Vinyl's Revenge share, which we extended with the second Wieniawski concerto.

    I think you will (still) love this music too.

    All works performed by Michael Rabin, violin

    Max BRUCH (1838-1920)
    Fantasie für die Violine mit Orchester und Harfe unter freier Benutzung schottischer Volksmelodien (Scottish Fantasy), op. 46
    [Vinyl’s Revenge #40]
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Sir Adrian Boult, conducting

    Henryk WIENIAWSKI (1835-1880)
    Violin Concerto No.1 in F Sharp Minor, op. 14
    [Vinyl’s Revenge#40]
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Sir Adrian Boult, conducting

    Violin ConcertoNo.2 in D Minor, op. 22
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Sir Eugene Goosens, conducting

    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/pcast375
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  4. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing A la Carte series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast January 4, 2019. The following notes are an update .

    The original post, featuring balletmusic by Prokofiev, is being “mashed up” into a new programme by adding another Prokofiev ballet.

    Cinderella is one of Prokofiev's most popular and melodious compositions, and has inspired a great many choreographers since its inception. The piece was composed between 1940 and 1944. Part way through writing it Prokofiev broke off to write his opera War and Peace.

    Cinderella is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and for the comic double-roles of the stepmother and the two stepsisters (which can be performed in travesti), more mad than bad in this treatment.

    Sergey PROKOFIEV (1891-1953)
    Romeo and Juliet (Ромео и Джульетта), Op. 64
    Selections from suites op. 64bis & ter
    New York Philharmonic
    Dimitri Mitropoulos, conducting
    [VR-20]

    Cinderella, Op.87 (Highlights)
    1 Introduction
    3 Cinderella
    12 Spring Fairy
    13 Summer Fairy
    14 Grasshoppers And Dragonflies
    15 Autumn Fairy
    16 Winter Fairy
    31 Promenade 1:36
    32 Cinderella's Dance
    33 Dance Of The Prince
    37 Waltz-Coda 1:36
    38 Midnight
    45 Cinderella's Awakening
    50 Amoroso: The Prince And Cinderella
    The Cleveland Orchestra
    Vladimir Ashkenazy, conducting

    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/alc-04
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  5. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast November 1, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses converted YouTube material:

    https://archive.org/details/01pianoc...ono.20indminor

    The entire TIME-LIFE collection of 10 concertos can be still found on our YouTube channel at the below address:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...u2RzkYabMIovFH
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  6. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 25, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses converted YouTube material:

    https://archive.org/details/01mozartpianoconcerto19inf

    The entire TIME-LIFE collection of 10 concertos can be still found on our YouTube channel at the below address:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...u2RzkYabMIovFH
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  7. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 23and 24, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses our original digital transfer files:

    (Nos 1-3) https://archive.org/details/07QuatuorEnUtMajeurOp.64No
    (Nos 4-6) https://archive.org/details/11QuatuorEnRMajeurOp.64No

    The YouTube clips I provided in the original post have since been removed. However, the Aeolian String Quartet’s complete recordings of the Haydn quartets are provided to YouTube by the Universal Music Group in the below playlist:

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...siAlpx1tyEmP_0

    A word about the transfer quality
    : I used my old Crosley “One touch” recording system. It is convenient but sometimes introduces digital glitches. In spite of some wear and surface noise, the transfer is generally good.
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    Updated Oct-23-2021 at 15:02 by itywltmt
  8. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing Friday series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 22, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.


    The original post featured some keyboard works by Claude Debussy, including his second book of preludes. As I statedin the original post, these were composed about two years after the first book, between the last months of 1912 and early April 1913. The works in Debussy's second book of préludes are similar in intent to those of Book I (1907 - 1910). Several of them look ahead to Debussy's later style, in which the composer's earlier impressionistic, almost Romantic poetry was supplanted by a greater concentration upon technique and neoclassical objectivity.

    In order to “stretch” the original share, I added Debussy’s cello sonata to open the A la Carte montage. Initially subtitled "Pierrot is angry at the moon," the Sonata for Cello and Piano does have in it some of the modern-day commedia dell'arte sensibility - a raw, heart-on-the-sleeve, dark humor. The Cello Sonata is the most unrefined, emotionally exposed of Debussy’s three sonatas - maybe even of all Debussy's works.

    Claude DEBUSSY (1862-1918)
    Featuring Francine Kay, piano

    Sonata for cello & piano in D Minor, L. 135
    (with Elizabeth Dolin, cello)

    Préludes Il, pour piano, L. 123
    Ballade (slave), pour piano, L. 70
    [Once Upon The Internet# 6]

    Full Commentary - https://itywltmt.blogspot.com/2021/1...s-debussy.html
    Playlist Details – https://archive.org/details/pcast369-Playlist
    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/pcast369

    Happy (further) listening!
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  9. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing A la Carte series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 19, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    The original post, featuring cello music by Beethoven and Bach, is being “mashed up” into a pair of new playlists, the first of which features Bach’s suites for solo cello.

    This new musical share, in tandem with another playlist from the Once Upon the Internet series completes the set of six suites.

    The second suite was taken from the complete set recorded by Mr. Markevitch, found on YouTube at the following URLs:

    Volume 1 (Suites 1, 3, 5) - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...DI1a6kqo25eiFs

    Volume 2 (Suites 2, 4 6) - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...CkEyvngReC9Pdw

    Happy (further) listening!

    Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

    Cello Suite no 2 in D Minor, BWV 1008
    Cello Suite no 5 in C minor, BWV 1011
    Cello Suite no 6 in D major, BWV 1012

    Dimitry Markevitch, cello

    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/01-alc-0...o-suites-2-5-6
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  10. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 11, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses converted YouTube material:

    https://archive.org/details/01MozartPianoConcertoNo18K4

    The entire TIME-LIFE collection of 10 concertos can be still found on our YouTube channel at the below address:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...u2RzkYabMIovFH
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  11. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast October 9 and 10, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses our original digital transfer files:

    https://archive.org/details/03-quatu...ineur-op.-20-n

    The YouTube clips I provided in the original post have since been removed. However, the Aeolian String Quartet’s complete recordings of the Haydn quartets are provided to YouTube by the Universal Music Group in the below playlist:

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...siAlpx1tyEmP_0

    A word about the transfer quality: I used my old Crosley “One touch” recording system. It is convenient but sometimes introduces digital glitches. In spite of some wear and surface noise, the transfer is generally good.
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  12. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 29, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Over the next few months, I will be creating archive pages for our posts featuring music from the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum. So far, none of the links found on these old posts have disappeared; the ISGM music library portal itself has changed however, with more fine-grained filters.


    ISGM Music Portal page – https://www.gardnermuseum.org/experience/music

    Archive page for this ISGM share - https://archive.org/details/02Souven...enceForStringS

    Happy (further) listening!
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  13. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are repurposing the music from this post as a new montage in our ongoing Friday series on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 24, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.


    The montage (ITYWLTMT #367) adds tracks from another Gundula Janowitz Schubert studio recording to the Milanese recital we featured in these pages nearly four years ago:

    Franz SCHUBERT (1797-1828)
    All songs feature Gundula Janowitz, soprano

    Gesänge aus Wilhelm Meister (Lied der Mignon), D. 877 Nos 2-4
    Text by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Irwin Gage, piano
    Recording: Berlin, Studio Lankwitz (1977-78)

    15 Lieder (Recital Milan, Italy, 1989)
    [Cover2Cover # 5]
    Charles Spencer, piano

    Full Commentary - http://itywltmt.blogspot.com/2021/09...-schubert.html
    Playlist Details – https://archive.org/details/pcast367-Playlist
    Archive Page - https://archive.org/details/367-gund...-sings-schuber

    Happy (further) listening!
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  14. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 23, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    Over the next few months, I will be creating archive pages for our posts featuring music from the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum. So far, none of the links found on these old posts have disappeared; the ISGM music library portal itself has changed however, with more fine-grained filters.

    ISGM Music Portal page – https://www.gardnermuseum.org/experience/music

    Archive page for this ISGM share - https://archive.org/details/001-stri....-1-in-c-minor

    Happy (further) listening!
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  15. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 21, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.


    We can’t help but feel nostalgic about that magical evening in 1963, two months before the Kennedy assassination and in the midst of Montréal’s “golden age”. The hall that was inaugurated that evening stopped being the MSO’s home base September 7, 2011 but that hall’s inaugural gala concert didn’t have the same cachet in my humble opinion.

    The original post’s archival links from Radio-Canada are no longer active, but we did manage to find the below broadcast footage of the entire concert on YouTube. The sound quality is not the greatest (I get the impression this was filmed off an old Philco TV set) but we never the less get transported to the night that was, with the pomp and circumstance launched with great zeal by Maestro Pelletier leading the orchestra in the two anthems representing Canada’s two solitudes (remember that O Canada was not officially our National Anthem until 1980!)

    How quickly we forget how young Zubin Mehta was at the time (27 years old!!). The MSO’s newest Music Director, Rafael Payare, is an old man at age… 42! The quality of the orchestra has also greatly improved – some of the mishaps in the Mahler are quickly overlooked given the solemnity of the night but would garner unanimously bad reviews were they present at a regular subscription concert.

    More Montréal nostalgia: the official program for the evening…

    Links of interest:

    The official program – https://archive.org/details/programm...1963-compresse
    Archived copy of the concert (video) – https://archive.org/details/ravel-ma...montracal-1963
    Archived (edited) audio track - https://archive.org/details/pda-1963



    Happy (further) listening!
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  16. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 18 and 19, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    As I discussed in the original post, the tracks I downloaded from Public Domain Classic did not contain all sixty sonatas from the set recorded by Ralph Kirkpatrick in the 1950’s. After further research, I believe the source could have been an Italian CD reissue containing 53 sonatas (Discogs link here). The Discogs reference in the original post points to a CBS Odyssey reissue of the sixty sonatas “in two volumes”, but the link itself points to Volume 1 only. The better link is to the original 1960 box set from Columbia (SL-221).

    In order to complete the set, I found (and assembled) some YouTube clips remastering the sixty sonatas in digital/faux stereo. The playlist is here:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...ZLyFTpwFN6aV1H

    I uploaded the missing sonatas from those clips and added them to the original archive page (link in above original post)

    Happy (further) listening!
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  17. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 17, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.


    As it happens, the YouTube clip that was used in the original post has since been removed. However, I did find an alternate playlist for your reference and listening pleasure. I note the playlist matches the original album in my collection, containing the Suite Española:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OL...8E7fBV7gs8X7Ww

    Our archive page – https://archive.org/details/202IberiaLivre4No.11laMi

    Happy (further) listening!
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  18. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 11 and 12, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    A few years ago, I created a pair of archive pages for the music shared in this post:

    The “unedited” video itself – https://archive.org/details/BBCProms...ightOfTheProms

    The audio track, with some editing – https://archive.org/details/LNP200402



    Happy (further) listening!
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  19. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 9, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.


    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. A survey of YouTube content shows many Wagner/Edo de Waart recordings, but no digital uploads of this specific recording other than ours. The archive page for this share uses our original digital transfer files:

    https://archive.org/details/02DieFeenOverture


    A word about the transfer quality: I used my old Crosley “One touch” recording system. It is convenient but sometimes introduces glitches. The Die Feen overture in particular had a few digital glitches. In spite of some wear and surface noise, the transfer is generally good.


    Happy (further) listening!
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  20. itywltmt's Avatar
    We are featuring the music from this post as part of our ongoing “222 day Binge Challenge” on the For Your Listening Pleasure podcast September 8, 2021. The following notes are an update with useful links we have created or discovered since the original post.

    In preparation for this post update, I encountered the discogs page for this particular CBC Records release and discovered (to my surprise!) that my above musing on this old vinyl disc was posted here as notes! The page link:

    https://www.discogs.com/Respighi-Sch...elease/6999490

    Many of the early posts in the Vinyl’s Revenge series did not have an archive page, as we relied entirely on the YouTube playlist discussed in the original post. The archive page for this share uses our original digital transfer files:

    https://archive.org/details/06-symph...en-re-majeur-d.

    A word about the transfer quality: I used my old Crosley “One touch” recording system. It is convenient but sometimes introduces glitches. The Respighi side of the LP is quite good, but the Schubert less so. The first movement has some surface noise and unfortunately a skip or two. I retained the transfer (my best effort) as I like the overall interpretation.


    Happy (further) listening!
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