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  1. Why Karajan's 1963 Beethoven 9th Is My Definitive 9th Recording: The First Movement

    I'll jump right into what I consider the deal-breaker for Beethoven's Ninth symphony: The first movement, "Allegro Ma Non Troppo, Un Poco Maestoso". For others, it's the Finale and I can certainly understand that. However, for myself, the first movement sets the tone of the entire symphony. Not to mention that it's such an amazing movement that others have called it a veritable symphony in and unto itself. It's extremely difficult to perfectly capture the weight, depth and emotion that
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    Updated Dec-07-2014 at 09:48 by DiesIraeCX

    Categories
    Classical Music , Composers , Conductors
  2. Glazunov’s Symphony No. 4: The Bridge Worth Crossing (Part 2)

    At face value, this symphony already poses some interesting features. The Fourth Symphony only has three movements: two relatively long and complex outer movements and a Scherzo in between. While none of the movements use Sonata form, Glazunov creates his own modified versions of theme and variation and sonata-rondo. Much like Schumann’s Symphony No. 4, this symphony’s main basis is an immense cyclical form of a handful of concrete themes. However, this is not a feature that the Nationalists
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  3. Glazunov’s Symphony No. 4: The Bridge Worth Crossing (Part 1)

    In the second half the 19th century, a civil war of musical sorts brewed in Russia. During the 1800s, there was a surge of artistic expression in Russia on all sides, from literature to art to music. Of all the intense identity crises that hit, musical academia was perhaps hit the hardest. In the course of 50 years, a clear division of ideology split musical academia in two: in St. Petersburg, a set of composers known as the “Mighty Handful” had set up camp and declared themselves as the true
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  4. Tchaikovsky: The Short Concertante Works


    En français

    On my Blogsport blogs (yes, because I now host two, my regular blog and a new French-only blog which we are trialling in BETA mode this December), I began a two-part look at some of the Tchaikovsky concertos.

    Today’s PTB post broadens things a bit, and looks at some of Tchaikovsky’s “short” concertante works – in most cases, these
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    Updated Dec-10-2013 at 11:33 by itywltmt

    Categories
    Classical Music , Composers , Recorded Music
  5. Some Vivaldi Concertos

    En français

    This week’s installment of Once Upon the Internet doesn’t require much preamble – I have packaged together a number of Vivaldi concertos for your listening pleasure.

    The first four concertos come from Vivaldi’s opus 4 (1712–1713) known as La stravanganza ("The Extravagance"). The set was first published in 1716 and was dedicated to a Venetian nobleman Signor Vettor Delfino. All of the concertos were scored for solo violin, strings, and basso continuo
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    Updated Nov-19-2013 at 13:34 by itywltmt

    Categories
    Classical Music , Composers , Recorded Music