View RSS Feed

Pierre's Tuesday Blog

Weekly blog on music, featuring selections openly available on the Web. Also, a "teaser" of things to come on my Friday blog and podcast on Blogspot.

[Warning: Embedded links and their content are provided here for musical enjoyment, and can be experienced on your PC without downloading required if you have access to the Internet. (Downloading files for use on your personal digital companion is generally possible, depending on the site.) Because we are not managing third-party web content, we cannot guarantee the currency of the link – all we can guarantee is that the link worked “as advertised” at the time of the original blog post. Please enjoy!]

  1. Manfred

    We may have skipped the last quarter of 2020, but we are back with a new quarterly Tuesday installment of our ongoing series of podcasts – number 354 and closing in on our 365th later this year.

    The common thread between the two works featured today is Lord Byron’s dramatic poem Manfred. The title character is a Faustian noble living in the Bernese Alps. Internally tortured by some mysterious guilt, which has to do with the death of his most beloved, Astarte, he uses his mastery of
    0 Likes
    ...

    Updated Mar-30-2021 at 13:20 by itywltmt

    Categories
    Classical Music , Composers , Recorded Music
  2. PTB Classic: Victor Herbert (1859 – 1924)

    This week's musing, another installment in our "Classic" series leveraging mash-up playlists as we did in the early days of the Tuesday Blog, was intended as an early St-Patrick's day present, featuring a composer of Irish descendance.

    As it turns out, I was wrong - and so was the composer for the longest time, apparently.

    According to my research, Victor Herbert's mother told him that he had been born in Dublin, and he believed this all his life, listing
    0 Likes
    ...
    Categories
    Classical Music , Composers
  3. Schumann - Berlin Philharmonic, Rafael Kubelik – Symphonies No.1 & 4

    I plan three posts for this five-Tuesday month, the first of which launches a three-part monthly set that will share all four of Robert Schumann's symphonies, beginning with the "Spring" symphony, as an early harbinger of the spring equinox a mere three weeks away.

    By age 30, Robert Schumann was already a successful composer of chamber music, including piano music and lieder. But in order to be able to make a living from composing he needed to achieve success in what was
    0 Likes
    ...
  4. Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957)

    For our tenth anniversary year, I couldn't resist programming a Once Upon the Internet montage, featuring tracks I downloaded years ago from the now defunct Japanese site Public Domain Classic.

    The site (as well as the still active Italian site LiberMusica) contained lots of old mono recordings from the NBC Symphony Orchestra under Arturo Toscanini, inclosing his complete 1949-52 Beethoven cycle - from which I chose the second symphony - and some other fine gems, including this Cherubini
    0 Likes
    ...
  5. The Unknown Richard Strauss, Piano Concertos For the Left Hand

    In August of 2019, I wrote a post on my Blogspot Music Blog about music written specifically for the Left Hand. At that time I wrote the following:

    [...] Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein [had] his right arm amputated during the First World War. He devised novel techniques, including pedal and hand-movement combinations that allowed him to play chords previously regarded as impossible for a five-fingered pianist.

    A musician who enjoyed the company of several luminaries
    0 Likes
    ...
Page 1 of 74 123451151 ... LastLast