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Pierre's Tuesday Blog

Weekly blog on music, featuring selections openly available on the Web. Also, a "teaser" of things to come on my Friday blog and podcast on Blogspot.

[Warning: Embedded links and their content are provided here for musical enjoyment, and can be experienced on your PC without downloading required if you have access to the Internet. (Downloading files for use on your personal digital companion is generally possible, depending on the site.) Because we are not managing third-party web content, we cannot guarantee the currency of the link – all we can guarantee is that the link worked “as advertised” at the time of the original blog post. Please enjoy!]

  1. Guitar Selections, Once Upon the Internet

    This week's musical share is a series of tracks downloaded mainly off the old MP3.COM between 2001 and 2003. They feature three guitarists.

    The English-born guitarist, Tomo Iwakura, began to learn the guitar with Iwao Suzuki when he was 12 years old. After his completion of a faculty of law at "Gakusuin Univaersity" in Tokyo, he studied the guitar with Michael Koch at the "Peter-Cornelius Konservatorium" in Mainz, Germany. Also he took lessons of Narciso Yepes,
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  2. Mahler, Wiener Philharmoniker, Pierre Boulez ‎– Symphonie No. 6

    This week’s Cover 2 Cover post completes our month-long look at Mahler symphonies, and in particular the set composed between 1903 and 1906. After the Eighth and Seventh (on my podcast this past Friday), now the Sixth.

    Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 is a symphony in four movements, composed in 1903 and 1904 (scoring repeatedly revised). Mahler conducted the work's first performance at the Saalbau concert hall in Essen on May 27, 1906. Mahler composed the symphony at what was apparently
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  3. Mahler - Solti, Chicago Symphony Orchestra ‎– The Eighth Symphony

    For September, both of my Tuesday Blog installments are dedicated to the music of Gustav Mahler, featuring two of his later symphonies his “Tragic” Sixth and this week, his mammoth Eighth.

    Until 1901, Mahler's compositions had been heavily influenced by the German folk-poem collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn. The music of Mahler's many Wunderhorn settings is reflected in his Symphonies No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4, which all employ vocal as well as instrumental forces. From about 1901, however,
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  4. Carl Nielsen, New Philharmonia Orchestra, Jascha Horenstein ‎– Symphony No. 5

    This week’s Tuesday Blog, an edition of our continuing Vinyl’s Revenge series, considers the beaten path through Nielsen’s symphonies (engaged in this series a few weeks ago with the Inextinguishable). Today’s choice is its companion Fifth symphony – companion insofar as it is common on CDs to offer these two symphonies together as a “package deal”…

    This week’s conductor is an interesting character. In a New York Times article I stumbled onto in researching this disc , Alex Ross writes
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  5. Tchaikovsky / Igor Markevitch, London Symphony Orchestra ‎– Manfred

    Today's Cover 2 Cover post continues along the beaten path of the many Tchaikovsky shares we've made here and on our Friday Blog and Podcast throughout 2018.

    According to the Gramophone review of his mid-1960's recordings of the Tchaikovsky symphonies,

    [Igor Markevitch's] passionate Russian temperament on the podium and the LSO in one of its heydays (the 1960s) are good enough reasons for investigating this set. Another is the chance to hear Tchaikovsky's brass with
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