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Conductors

  1. Nielsen - San Francisco Symphony / Herbert Blomstedt ‎– Symphonies 1 & 6

    For November, I’ve lined up a pair of Tuesday posts highlighting symphonies by a pair of Scandinavian composers. This week is a Cover 2 Cover share of a pair of Nielsen symphonies.

    A few months back, I featured Nielsen’s Fourth symphony with Herbert Blomstedt and the Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra - part of his earlier Nielsen cycle, recorded between 1973 and 1975, and for their time were the best available recordings of Nielsen's key works.

    Later on digital format,
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  2. Gidon Kremer / Sibelius & Schumann ‎– Violin Concertos

    This week’s installment of Vinyl’s Revenge is a mid-1980’s coupling of violin concertos featuring Latvian violinist Gidon Kremer and the Philharmonia Orchestra under Riccardo Muti.

    If we were to create a pie chart of all the concerti for solo instrument and orchestra, I’d hazard to guess at least 2/3 of the pie would be occupied by concertos for either keyboard or violin. The violin concerto repertoire is huge, mostly composed of baroque and classical-era works – Vivaldi contributed
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  3. Mahler, Wiener Philharmoniker, Pierre Boulez ‎– Symphonie No. 6

    This week’s Cover 2 Cover post completes our month-long look at Mahler symphonies, and in particular the set composed between 1903 and 1906. After the Eighth and Seventh (on my podcast this past Friday), now the Sixth.

    Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 is a symphony in four movements, composed in 1903 and 1904 (scoring repeatedly revised). Mahler conducted the work's first performance at the Saalbau concert hall in Essen on May 27, 1906. Mahler composed the symphony at what was apparently
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  4. Mahler - Solti, Chicago Symphony Orchestra ‎– The Eighth Symphony

    For September, both of my Tuesday Blog installments are dedicated to the music of Gustav Mahler, featuring two of his later symphonies his “Tragic” Sixth and this week, his mammoth Eighth.

    Until 1901, Mahler's compositions had been heavily influenced by the German folk-poem collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn. The music of Mahler's many Wunderhorn settings is reflected in his Symphonies No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4, which all employ vocal as well as instrumental forces. From about 1901, however,
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  5. Carl Nielsen, New Philharmonia Orchestra, Jascha Horenstein ‎– Symphony No. 5

    This week’s Tuesday Blog, an edition of our continuing Vinyl’s Revenge series, considers the beaten path through Nielsen’s symphonies (engaged in this series a few weeks ago with the Inextinguishable). Today’s choice is its companion Fifth symphony – companion insofar as it is common on CDs to offer these two symphonies together as a “package deal”…

    This week’s conductor is an interesting character. In a New York Times article I stumbled onto in researching this disc , Alex Ross writes
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