View RSS Feed

All Blog Entries

  1. 2021 Listening Project - Feb 2 - Feb 13

    I've had an extremely busy period of time with my job, and so limited time to listen, or write down my thoughts. So I'm compressing nearly 2 weeks into one post.

    Vivaldi
    Four Seasons: Summer

    I love the drama and bombast of this, and all the fast stuff. Super fun.

    Chopin Nocturnes, Op 32, 37, and 55
    Maurizio Pollini

    I'm not sure what I think about the various sudden "pauses" in Op 32/1. Do they "work" as
    0 Likes
    ...
    Categories
    Uncategorized
  2. 2021 Listening Project - Feb 1

    Haydn
    String Quartet No. 61 "Fifths"
    Emerson Quartet

    Now this is my favorite of the Haydn quartets that I've been listening to. All the movements are just great. Only one more from this set: No. 66 "Lobkowitz".
    0 Likes
    Categories
    Uncategorized
  3. 2021 Listening Project - Jan 30

    Vivaldi
    Four Seasons: Autumn
    Simon Standage, violin
    The English Concert
    Trevor Pinnock, conductor

    More baroque music that makes me think of 80's metal. I love the quiet background pizzicato in the middle movement, and the drone in the last.

    Ives
    Symphony No. 1
    Chicago Symphony Orchestra
    Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor

    So different from his other music! I've always really liked this piece, and enjoyed listening
    0 Likes
    ...
    Categories
    Uncategorized
  4. 2021 Listening Project - Jan 29

    Jan 29

    Haydn
    String Quartet No. 53 "The Lark"
    Emerson Quartet

    Good. I like the last movement in particular

    Charles Ives
    Symphony No. 4
    Chicago Symphony Orchestra
    Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor.

    I find this piece fascinating. The second movement is so noisy (in the sense of lots of different things going on). Then you have this really beautiful and more traditional 3rd "Fugue" movement
    0 Likes
    ...
    Categories
    Uncategorized
  5. The Unknown Richard Strauss, Piano Concertos For the Left Hand

    In August of 2019, I wrote a post on my Blogspot Music Blog about music written specifically for the Left Hand. At that time I wrote the following:

    [...] Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein [had] his right arm amputated during the First World War. He devised novel techniques, including pedal and hand-movement combinations that allowed him to play chords previously regarded as impossible for a five-fingered pianist.

    A musician who enjoyed the company of several luminaries
    0 Likes
    ...