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Respighi. The Pines of Rome. The bird is a tape recording. I don't think that's what the OP meant, but a tape recorder--or whatever device is used--is electronic. Or at least electrical.

Bach. Switched on Bach. Wendy Carlos.
 

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I prefer music that doesn't lull me to sleep, whether it be of a Baroque, Classical, Romantic ... or post-Modern nature. Music where something "goes on" that challenges the ears and mind proves, to my sensibilities, much more satisfying than just "pretty tune" music or that stuff that "floats" in the nether-spaces of musical nirvana.

This piece shows up on the 2018 Donaueschinger Musiktage compilation from NEOS. It floats, at times, but also features enough moments of "attack dog brilliance" that I never felt a drooping eye lid during the entire half hour.

It shows up in a video sound clip: Marco Stroppa: Come play with me (2016/18) for solo electronics and orchestra


This next one appears on the same NEOS compilation (NEOS 11914-15) as the work above. Again, music with stuff going on.

Ivan Fedele: Air on air (2018), for amplified basset horn and orchestra.


From friends of "new music" at NEOS:

Plant Font Terrestrial plant Adaptation Art
Font Parallel Document Screenshot Number
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Jason Thorpe Buchanan - all-forgetting-is-retrieval


performed by TACETi Ensemble Pisol Manatchinapisit (alto saxophone), Christhatai Paksamai (bass clarinet), Siravith Kongbandalsuk (trombone), Noppakorn Auesirinucroch (guitar), Pipe Kantapong (percussion), Tapanat Kiatpaibulkit (violin), Kantika Comenaphatt (cello), Piyawat Louilarpprasert (augmented conductor), Jason Thorpe Buchanan (electronics)
all-forgetting-is-retrieval by Jason Thorpe Buchanan (2019)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Maija Hynninen — in the universe everyth ng is a circle (2020)


performed by Heather Roche

Composer Maija Hynninen (b. 1977) is working in the areas of concert music, electronic instrument design and multidisciplinary performances. The essence of her music builds on the unique moments where the parameters of this world are slightly altered to allow a glimpse of another reality to be present. It can be a moment where the timbre of purely acoustical writing gives surprising results or when electronics project sounds into another domain, another space and reality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Stefan Węgłowski: Contemporary Jewish Music - "Beginning" (2017)


Despite bearing such a bald, straightforward title, Polish composer Stefan Węgłowski’s relationship with Jewish music, as manifested in the five works that comprise his Contemporary Jewish Music cycle, is a complex one. Węgłowski has drawn on textual and musical elements from traditional Jewish sources, but one would often be hard pressed to know that they were there, let alone recognise them. The composition process began with recordings of improvisations by a small instrumental ensemble, which Węgłowski then worked on electronically, creating a sound world primarily characterised by shifting textures and colours, all seemingly built upon a soft ‘ticking over’ pulse. Regardless of the ‘Jewishness’ of the music, taken on its own terms as something in between electroacoustic and acousmatic music, the dramatic and emotional range of this cycle is all too apparent. ‘Beginning’ works as an overture, effectively setting up the environment within which everything else will follow. (5:4)
 

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Despite being a huge fan of mid to late 20th century classical music, I'm really not much of a fan of electronic instruments used in classical music.

That being said, there are a couple I like.

Charles Wuorinen - Concerto for Amplified Violin and Orchestra (1972)

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Galya Bisengalieva is a Kazakh-British violinist. Improvisor, collaborator and leader of the London Contemporary Orchestra based in London.


Galya Bisengalieva ~ EP Two (2019)
Darren Cunningham, Galya Bisengaliveva

The Kazakh/British violinist has been building her career for years, but this release deserves to be her breakthrough. She’s already worked with some of our favorite composers, including Hildur Guðnadóttir, Mica Levi, Sarah Davachi and Pauline Oliveros. She led the London Symphony Orchestra on Phantom Thread and contributed solo violin to films such as Suspiria.

Last year’s EP One included works by Claire M Singer and Emilie Levienaise-Farrouch, along with Bisengalieva’s own “Tulpar” (remixed by Actress as a digital bonus on the current EP). But that release was a completely different animal: patient, meditative, serene. The same holds true for her work on Danny Mulhern’s Safe House: lovely, accomplished musicianship, but little hint of what was to come.

In fact, only “Tulpar” (a Kazakh version of Pegasus) offers a glimmer of the absolute craziness ~ the creative fire ~ that suffuses EP Two with the sort of energy that makes one sit bolt upright. This is something new, an adrenaline shot all too rare in the music industry. (
a closer listen)
 
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