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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I have four other new live performance videos I could share, I decided to just post my trombone octet that was recently premiered. If for no other reason, then you don't get to see such an ensemble that often.

It's a good, but not a perfect performance. But then again contrapuntal music is always tricky and this work has a number of such passages. Hopefully in the future, other performances will be even better and I can say that because I recently signed a contract with a publisher for this work.

 
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Thanks for sharing this and congratulations on the performance and publishing deal.

it’s very interesting to get more feel for the capability of the trombone. Clearly many underestimate / underutilise them.
 

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Took this in a few times and began to latch on to some nice contrapuntal motivic workings, in particular the 2+3 note rising scale leading to a larger leap upwards that starts and ends the piece (heard particularly clearly at around 5 mins) and the bustling chromaticism of the rhythmic staccato. Big fan of some of those scrunchy chords in the middle too that bought some relief from the counterpoint for a while. Really nice and enjoyable workout Vasks.
 

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[B]mikeh375[/B],
yes resolving polyphony to chord in 3-37 e.g. is good. And in generally I dop not like many sax, or trombones without harmonic instrument. But it is not this composition. this chords (like 3-37) sowt and melodical enough. I'll advice my friends from jazz.
I will advise my friends who play saxophones and trumpets as an example of the successful use of a chord with wind instruments. Because it's quite rare, from my point of view, when a brass chord sounds good without strings or a harmonic instrument.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Let me respond in order of comments:

Yes, Ramon, it's always good to have performances and truly fun to have a video of it (although audio only is fine enough)

Adrien: Yes, the trombone is more versatile than what they usually are expected of in orchestral works. The one thing amateur composers miss when writing for all brass in the need for lip rest spots (where, how long and how often). If one watched a single player in this video you'll see how I handle it.

oliv & Mike: Yeah, there are some really cool chords in the slow section. Inspired by what Wallingford Riegger did in his Opus 45 (see below Youtube). Ever since I was a teenager, I have had this LP and loved his thick chords.
 

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Adrien: Yes, the trombone is more versatile than what they usually are expected of in orchestral works. The one thing amateur composers miss when writing for all brass in the need for lip rest spots (where, how long and how often). If one watched a single player in this video you'll see how I handle it.
Is there a good reference you can recommend where we can find out more about this? I guess it comes down to time spent at dynamic and pitch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Perhaps there is somewhere a reference, but I doubt it. There too many variables among all players. Some have better endurance and therefore can play longer &/or louder &/or higher than others. Therefore, it is best to assume that you are writing for an average brass player rather than for those who could play longer, higher and louder without much or any needed lip rest time. I suggest that one compose the piece first, then study each individual part (don't look at the score, just the "part") and see if seems reasonable. Actually I do that with all parts (strings, winds, percussion also) as I discover things like (1) too little playing opportunities (2) not enough breathing places (3) boring, non-melodic writing. Then I can go back into the score and correct those spots.
 
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