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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Join me on a years journey through classical music from medieval to contemporary.

You may be a beginner who, like me a year ago, wants to discover and listen to music that is highly recommended in each period. You might be a fan of one composer, or a lover of one period, and be interested to discover more of other composers or other music. You might be an experienced listener who is interested to share your knowledge with others in an accessible way. Whatever your motivation, I hope you’ll find this thread to be of value.

We’ll spend time:

Q1
Week 1a: Early Music & Ars Antiqua inc. Hildegard von Bingen, Pérotin & Léonin
Week 1b: Composers born 1300-1399 inc. Machaut, Dufay & Dunstaple
Week 2: Composers born 1400-1466 inc. Josquin & Ockeghem
Week 3: Composers born 1467-1533 inc. Palestrina, Tallis & Lassus
Week 4: Composers born 1534-1567 inc. Monteverdi, Dowland & Byrd
Week 5: Composers born 1568-1599 inc. Allegri, Schütz & Praetorius
Week 6: Composers born 1600-1633 inc. Carissimi, Lully & Strozzi
Week 7: Composers born 1634-1666 inc. Purcell, Corelli & Biber
Week 8: Composers born 1667-1681 inc. Vivaldi, Couperin & Telemann
Week 9: Composers born 1681-1685 inc. Handel & Rameau
Week 10: Composers born 1685-1695 inc. JS Bach pre-Leipzig
Week 11: Composers born 1696-1699 inc. JS Bach in Leipzig
Week 12: Composers from the Baroque to Classical transition inc. Tartini, Scarlatti & CPE Bach
Week 13: Composers known primarily for opera born 1600-1799 inc. Rossini, Gluck & Donizetti

Q2
Week 14: Composers born 1700-1724 plus Haydn works 1760-1783
Week 15: Composers born 1725-1732 plus Haydn works 1784-1803
Week 16: Composers born 1733-1739 plus Mozart works 1772-1779
Week 17: Composers born 1740-1749 plus Mozart works 1780-1785
Week 18: Composers born 1750-1759 plus Mozart works 1786-1791
Week 19: Composers born 1760-1769 plus Beethoven works 1795-1805
Week 20: Composers born 1770-1783 plus Beethoven works 1806-1811
Week 21: Composers born 1784-1794 plus Beethoven works 1812-1827
Week 22: Composers born 1795-1799 inc. Schubert
Week 23: Composers born 1800-1809 inc. Berlioz & Mendelssohn
Week 24: Composers born 1810 inc. Chopin & Schumann
Week 25: Composers born 1811-1819 inc. Liszt
Week 26: Composers known primarily for opera born 1800-1840 inc. Verdi, Wagner & Bellini

Q3
Week 27: Composers born 1820-1832 inc. Smetana, Bruckner & Franck
Week 28: Composers born 1833 inc. Brahms
Week 29: Composers born 1834-1839 inc. Bizet, Bruch, Saint-Saëns plus "The Big Five"
Week 30: Composers born 1840-1843 exc. Dvořák inc. Tchaikovsky & Grieg
Week 31: Composers born 1844-1849 plus Dvořák inc. Fauré
Week 32: Composers born 1850-1859 inc. Elgar & Janáček
Week 33: Composers born 1860-1862 inc. Debussy & Mahler
Week 34: Composers born 1864-1865 inc. Sibelius, Strauss R & Nielsen
Week 35: Composers born 1866-1872 inc. Satie & Scriabin
Week 36: Composers associated with the English Pastoral School inc. Vaughan Williams
Week 37: Composers born 1873-1875 inc. Rachmaninov & Ravel
Week 38: Composers born 1876-1879 plus those associated with the Second Viennese School inc. Berg & Schoenberg
Week 39: Composers known primarily for opera born 1841-1939 inc. Puccini & Massenet

Q4
Week 40: Composers born 1880-1884 exc. Stravinsky inc. Bartók, Kodály & Varèse
Week 41: Composers born 1885-1889 plus Stravinsky inc. Villa-Lobos
Week 42: Composers born 1890-1891 inc. Prokofiev & Martinů
Week 43: Composers born 1892-1897 inc. Hindemith plus all of "Les Six"
Week 44: Composers born 1898-1902 inc. Gershwin, Copland & Walton
Week 45: Composers born 1903-1906 inc. Shostakovich & Khachaturian
Week 46: Composers born 1907-1910 inc. Barber, Messiaen & Carter
Week 47: Composers born 1911-1916 inc. Britten & Cage
Week 48: Composers born 1917-1925 inc. Bernstein, Berio, Ligeti & Boulez
Week 49: Composers born 1926-1933 inc. Górecki, Schnittke & Penderecki
Week 50: Composers born 1934-1939 inc. Reich, Pårt & Glass
Week 51: Composers born 1940-present inc. Adams, Saariaho & Tavener
Week 52: -

The journey begins on 1st January 2022. Join me for the full journey or link in when it suits your listening. I hope there’ll be plenty of discussion, and only ask that whatever you share remains positive and helpful to those with perhaps less experience and knowledge than you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So how will this work?

Over the past eighteen months I’ve sought to establish the most recommended music to widen my understanding and appreciation of all eras of classical music. After a few false starts, I decided to analyse the works recommended by various sources. These include a wide range of media such as classical music radio stations in the US, UK and Australia, books by Swafford and others, academic resources, publications from the US and UK, and internet sources including Gramophone and of course, our very own Talk Classical listings. I tried where I could to avoid one person’s opinion, unless like Swafford, they have a sound reputation. I found that many ignored either early or contemporary music so went to a couple of additional resources for those. In total, I used nearly forty different sources that I judged to be of sufficient quality to justify their inclusion.

Each week I’ll share the most highly recommended listening for the period and we can explore and discuss the top pieces. At more than 100 pieces per week on avearge, we’ll not have the time to listen to everything and how deep into the list you want to delve is entirely up to you. I’ll provide the full listing for your future reference.

I wont be recommending which versions of each piece to listen to. I’ll leave it for others more knowledgeable and experienced than me to share their insights. Where appropriate I’ll mention the version that I have or prefer, but I recognise that tastes differ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
A little about me before we begin.

I was a long-time beginner with classical music. I had listened to what you might call popular classics since I was in my late-twenties (I virtually wore out all of The Classic Experience cds for anyone that knows them). I also attended opera including Tosca at the ROH, Turandot in Bordeaux, The Magic Flute in Paris, Aida in Orange, and Lulu, Queen of Spades and Jenůfa at Glyndebourne.

In May 2020, I was challenged by a friend on Facebook to post ten albums that influenced my life, one per day. In deciding which ten to choose I discovered that amongst the Bowie, Dylan, John Martyn, and Florence and the Machine albums, my most played album on iTunes was Mendelssohn’s Piano Trios by Perlman, Ma and Ax. I didn’t even remember buying it, and certainly hadn’t realised that I had listened to it twice as much as any other album I owned. This discovery made me determine to delve deeper into classical music and ultimately brought me to Talk Classical. I’m now, ‘hooked’, and am grateful for many doyens of this site for sharing so much information, guidance and insight in various threads that has supported my learning and listening over the past eighteen months.

I certainly don’t consider myself an expert. Far, far from it. These listings are unlikely to be error-free. All I can say is that I’ve lived and continue to live the, “n00b”, experience and know how challenging it can be for anyone wanting to learn more about classical. This thread is designed to help. You might consider it a ‘sister’ thread to pianozach’s execllent, “Beginner’s Guide to Classical Music”, giving some structure to the task and I’ll link to his excellent commentary on individual pieces as appropriate. I’ll also try to link to some of the resources we have on composers and pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is completely ridiculous. January covers at least 500 years. April, May and June covers probably less than 100 years.
I'm sorry you feel that way. I can only share the music that's recommended listening in each period and the spread works pretty much evenly. As I shared, I even added recommendations for early and contemporary music beyond the standard sources. It might work out for the best, but I know it won't delight everyone. Let's, "Suck it and see".
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
... Anyway, count me in for your exploration of this music. Outside of the 16 operas I've seen, plus smatterings of the usual bigwigs like Mozart & Beethoven, I have very limited understanding of classical music. Even if it is the blind leading the blind :)

EDIT: I'm glad pianozach mentioned his own Beginners Guide. I'm getting through that now. I'm not quite his target audience, but so far it's a fun curation!
Great to have you along for the ride. It looks like there may be a little turbulence along the way, but we'll smooth it all out as best we can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
Hardly the grand entrance I'd envisioned. Today has got away from me. Let me just put this here and revisit later.

In week one we're exploring the early medieval and ars antiqua period. As several have said, it's a big time span to cover off in one week. My research revealed only 23 recommended pieces for the time period. Further sources added another 49 pieces so we have a total of 72 for the week.

There are two pieces that lead the way with nine recommendations each. To choose a piece of the week, I've selected the one of those two that sits highest in Science's "Talk Classical Community's Favorite and Most Highly Recommend Works". That piece is:

Pérotin: Viderunt omnes

You'll find some great discussion on the piece and some opinion on the best versions here. Viderunt Omnes is #88 in pianozach's listing.

I'll be relistening to this version a little later:



Pérotin: Viderunt omnes

Tonus Peregrinus

I'll reveal more recommendations as we go through the week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 · (Edited)
Could you perhaps give us a bit more on what to expect each day or week? You mentioned there would be about 100 works per week. You listed 1 work today. How often will you list works and how many works will you list each time? Or will it vary?

Do you hope to have others list and discuss works they enjoy from the period in discussion, or would you prefer people respond to the works you list after you list them?
A couple of good questions that I'd planned to address this morning and didn't get to it. Thanks for the opportunity to clarify.

The works divide themselves into seven categories:

• Level 1 - 22 or more recommendations (1 work per week on average)
• Level 2 - 16-21 recommendations (2 works)
• Level 3 - 11-15 recommendations (4 works)
• Level 4 - 7-10 recommendations (7 works)
• Level 5 - 4-6 recommendations (11 works)
• Level 6 - 2-3 recommendations (20 works)
• Level 7 - 1 recommendation (60 works)

In a week with a perfect distribution of works, I plan to post one level per day. The challenge comes when there are a relatively low number of works and/or no highly recommended works in a week, such as the first few weeks. I'll change it up if it's not working well by February.

I'm happy for people to discuss whatever they find interesting in the period. I guess my only priority is to try to retain a primary focus on the listener. This thread is about exposing the beginner to a range of works across each period.

I'm also open to constructive suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
For today, the piece to narrowly miss out on work of the week:

Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia Harmoniae Celestium Revelatorium

And our final "Level 4" work (7-10 recommendations) this week:

Hildegard von Bingen: Ordo Virtutum

You'll find some interesting discussion on Hildegard's work here.

For me, I'll be listening to these later today:



Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia Harmoniae Celestium Revelatorium

Jeremy Summerly, Oxford Camerata



Hildegard von Bingen: Ordo Virtutum

Vox Animae

If you are able to download it, there's what I found to be an excellent BBC Radio 3 Composer of the Week podcast called, "The Birth of Polyphony" that covers much of what I'm sharing this week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 · (Edited)
Let's talk Trouvères, Troubadours, and Minnesängers. The recommendations for these types of music are:

Level 5 (4-6 recommendations)

Adam de la Halle: La Jeu de Robin et de Marion

Level 6 (2-3 recommendations)

Bernart de Ventadorn: Can Vei La Lauzeta Mover
Walther von der Vogelweide: Palästinlied

Level 7 (1 recommendation)

Marcabru: L'Autrier Jost'una Serbissa
Marcabru: Pax! In Nomine Domini
Raimon de Miraval: Ainsi Cum es Genser Pascors
Giraut de Bornelh: Reis Glorios
Walther von der Vogelweide: Unter der Linden
Audefroi le Bastart: Bele Y Doine
Neidhart von Reuental: Meienzit
Adam de la Halle: Bone Amourette
Adam de la Halle: Dieus Soit en Cheste Maison
Adam de la Halle: Fines Amouretes
Ernoul Caupain: Ler main pensis chevauchai


I was astonished to read that there are more than 25 different genres of Troubadour music. For those with a deeper knowledge than me, tell us what you know and who and what are we missing from this list?

My planned listening for today:



Adam de la Halle: La Jeu de Robin et de Marion

Claude Bernatchez, Ensemble Anonymous



Bernart de Ventadorn: Can Vei La Lauzeta Mover

Duo Enßle-Lamprecht



Walther von der Vogelweide: Palästinlied, Unter der Linden

I Ciarlatani, Augsburg Early Music Ensemble
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 · (Edited)
I do not intend any offense, but I am truly confused. May I ask, "what is the purpose of this thread?"

When I read your OP I was under the impression that we could offer our ideas about composers and recordings from the period under discussion. But what I've noticed since the beginning of the actual discussion, you seem to be working from some list of composers. And free recommendations appear to be unwelcome, since when I offered the Machaut Messe, you posted something about he Ars Nova to be discussed in the next week. A comment which confused me, since there had been no weekly list of topics.

Also, concerning the troubadours, I was about to post about my favorite collection fo recordings, which contain most, if not all, of the existing music available. But stopped when I saw your post talking about levels, and specific composers.

Where did these levels come from? And why are they important? These posts have cased me to wonder "what is the purpose for this thread?" IOW, do you have some end result in mind you are trying to achieve?
You're right. The thread is suffering as result of my lack of time on Saturday and the consequent rushed start to proceedings. My apologies. Let me clarify.

The prime purpose of this thread is to guide beginners to the best classical music to listen to. The thread is about the listener, no so much about the music - there are plenty of threads and resources for that and we can link to them. The thread may have a number of side-benefits. For example, there's a thread started today titled, "Where to start with Sibelius' symphonies?" As we cover each time period, this thread may help to answer that type of question.

You input is most welcome. I had neglected to clarify specifically that this week we're looking at early medieval and Ars Antiqua. Ars Nova comes next week. I smiled at your otherwise very helpful recommendation since I'd originally planned to cover both in one week, so it would have been the 'Work of the Week', but separated them at Mandryka 'suggestion' that we should spend a little more time in Medieval and Renaissance. I'm sorry if you thought I felt your suggestion was unwelcome. It was not.

So, where does the list come from and what are the, "Levels"? In researching for myself last year, I identified nearly forty sources of recommendations for classical listening. They include classical radio stations in the US, UK and Australia, publications like the Guardian and WSJ, academic resources, books and internet content including our own Talk Classical listings. I made a judgement on the quality and provenance of the recommendations, excluding those that I felt were not adequate.

My judgement is that the more reccommendations any individual work received, the more likely it is that it should be recommended to a beginner. In collating the data, I happened to group the works into seven categories or levels:

Level 1 - works that received 22 recommendations or more
Level 2 - works that received between 16 and 21 recommendations
Level 3 - 11-15 recommendations
Level 4 - 7-10 recommendations
Level 5 - 4-6 recommendations
Level 6 - 2-3 recommendations
Level 7 - 1 recommendation

There's no specific logic behind the seven levels. They just happened.

Each week I plan to share the list. In an ideal world where there are works at each level, that will be one post per day sharing each level as we progress through the week. After that we can do what we want with it. Let it just sit here. Discuss the works. Answer any questions someone asks. The thread will flourish or wither based on the interaction. I hope it flourishes.

Next week we'll cover Ars Nova and composers born before 1400. After that there'll be a week of Josquin and his contemporaries, then Byrd/Tallis/Lassus, then Monteverdi ....
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I had a hard time getting into the Adam de la Halle. I understand it's a stage play or some sort of theatrical performance piece, and I always struggle digesting those purely via recording....
The first recording of Le Jeux that I listened to was overly theatrical. I don't know why so many slap their thighs and ham it up as if it's a comic opera.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 · (Edited)
Four more pieces for today, highlighted in red below. Firstly some more Léonin/Pérotin. The Guido d'Arezzo story is cool. The Play of Daniel is one of my favourite early pieces. I thought it might be helpful to share the updated list list as we proceed.

Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
No works

Level 4
Pérotin: Viderunt Omnes
Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia Harmoniae Celestium Revelatorium
Hildegard von Bingen: Ordo Virtutum

Level 5
Adam de la Halle: La Jeu de Robin et de Marion
Léonin: Magnus Liber Organi
Pérotin: Sederunt Principes
Guido d'Arezzo: Ut Quent Laxis / Micrologus - Do-Re-Mi


Level 6
Anon. (Students at Beauvais Cathedral): Play of Daniel (Egerton Manuscript)
Bernart de Ventadorn: Can Vei La Lauzeta Mover
Walther von der Vogelweide: Palästinalied

Level 7
Marcabru: L'Autrier Jost'una Serbissa
Marcabru: Pax! In Nomine Domini
Raimon de Miraval: Ainsi Cum es Genser Pascors
Giraut de Bornelh: Reis Glorios
Walther von der Vogelweide: Unter der Linden
Audefroi le Bastart: Bele Y Doine
Neidhart von Reuental: Meienzit
Adam de la Halle: Bone Amourette
Adam de la Halle: Dieus Soit en Cheste Maison
Adam de la Halle: Fines Amouretes
Ernoul Caupain: Ler main pensis chevauchai

My listening for today:



Léonin: Magnus Liber Organi

Paul Hilliard, Hilliard Ensemble



Pérotin: Sederunt Principes

Tonus Peregrinus



Anon.: Play of Daniel

William Lyons, Dufay Collective
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 · (Edited)
Six more pieces for today, highlighted in red below.

Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
No works

Level 4
Pérotin: Viderunt Omnes
Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia Harmoniae Celestium Revelatorium
Hildegard von Bingen: Ordo Virtutum

Level 5
Adam de la Halle: La Jeu de Robin et de Marion
Léonin: Magnus Liber Organi
Pérotin: Sederunt Principes
Guido d'Arezzo: Ut Quent Laxis / Micrologus - Do-Re-Mi

Level 6
Anon. (Students at Beauvais Cathedral): Play of Daniel (Egerton Manuscript)
Bernart de Ventadorn: Can Vei La Lauzeta Mover
John of Fornsete: Sumer is Icumen In
Anon.: Winchester Troper
Pérotin: Beata Viscera

Walther von der Vogelweide: Palästinalied

Level 7
Anon.: Llibre Vermell de Montserrat
Yared: The Book of Zimare
Kassia of Byzantium: Ek Rizis Agathis

Marcabru: L'Autrier Jost'una Serbissa
Marcabru: Pax! In Nomine Domini
Raimon de Miraval: Ainsi Cum es Genser Pascors
Giraut de Bornelh: Reis Glorios
Walther von der Vogelweide: Unter der Linden
Audefroi le Bastart: Bele Y Doine
Neidhart von Reuental: Meienzit
Adam de la Halle: Bone Amourette
Adam de la Halle: Dieus Soit en Cheste Maison
Adam de la Halle: Fines Amouretes
Ernoul Caupain: Ler main pensis chevauchai

My listening for today:



Kassia of Byzantium: Ek Rizis Agathis (From a Good Root)

VocaMe



John of Fornsete: Sumer is Icumen In

Huelgas Ensemble



Anon.: Winchester Troper

Mary Berry, Schola Gregoriana Of Cambridge



Anon.: Llibre Vermell de Montserrat

Jordi Savall, Hespèrion XXI, La Capella Reial De Catalunya
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 · (Edited)
The full listing for this week of early and Ars Antiqua works.

Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
No works

Level 4
Pérotin: Viderunt Omnes
Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia Harmoniae Celestium Revelatorium
Hildegard von Bingen: Ordo Virtutum

Level 5
Adam de la Halle: La Jeu de Robin et de Marion
Léonin: Magnus Liber Organi
Pérotin: Sederunt Principes
Guido d'Arezzo: Ut Quent Laxis / Micrologus - Do-Re-Mi

Level 6
Anon. (Students at Beauvais Cathedral): Play of Daniel (Egerton Manuscript)
Bernart de Ventadorn: Can Vei La Lauzeta Mover
John of Fornsete: Sumer is Icumen In
Anon.: Winchester Troper
Pérotin: Beata Viscera
Walther von der Vogelweide: Palästinalied

Level 7
Anon.: Llibre Vermell de Montserrat
Beatriz, Comtessa de Dia: A Chantar M'er de So qu'eu No Volria
Anon.: Alle Psallite Cum Luya (Montpellier Codex)
Anon.: On parole, A Paris, Frese nouvele (Montpellier Codex)
Anon.: J'ai les maus d'amours - Que ferai (Montpellier Codex)
Anon.: Cunctipotens Genitor (Codex Calixtinus)
Yared: The Book of Zimare
Kassia of Byzantium: Ek Rizis Agathis
Tuotilo: An Easter Drama
Anon.: Quem Quaeritus in Sepulchro
Wipo of Burgundy: Victimae paschali laudes
Abelard, Peter: O Quanta Qualia
Abelard, Peter: Planchus Jacob Super Filios Suos
Adam of Saint-Victor: Lauda Sion Salvatorem / Lauda Crusis Attolamus
Anon.: Planctus Cigni
Marcabru: L'Autrier Jost'una Serbissa
Marcabru: Pax! In Nomine Domini
Raimon de Miraval: Ainsi Cum es Genser Pascors
Giraut de Bornelh: Reis Glorios
Walther von der Vogelweide: Unter der Linden
Audefroi le Bastart: Bele Y Doine
Neidhart von Reuental: Meienzit
Thibault I of Navarre: De Bone Amour Vient Séance Bonté
Anon.: Se J'ai Ame
Anon.: Thomas Gemma Cantuariae / Thomas Caesus in Doveria
Lorenzo de Firenze (Masini): A Poste Messe
Lorenzo de Firenze (Masini): Non So Qual I mi Voglia
Adam de la Halle: Bone Amourette
Adam de la Halle: Dieus Soit en Cheste Maison
Adam de la Halle: Fines Amouretes
Anon.: Tempus Adest Floridum "Good King Wenceslas"
Anon.: Se Je Chant
Anon.: Nordic Hymn Nobilis, Humilis "Saint Magnus Hymn"
Petrus de Cruce: Aucun ont Trouv'
Anon.: Jesu Cristes milde moder
Anon.: Angelus Domini (Chartres Fragment)
Anon.: Christ ist Erstanden
Anon.: Dicant Nunc Judei (Chartres Fragment)
Anon.: Easter Chants: Allleluia and Victimae Pascheli Laudes
Anon.: Ecce Sacerdos Magnus
Anon.: Edi beo thu hevene quene
Anon.: Epiphaniam domino canamus - Balaam inquit
Anon.: Hoquetus In Seculum
Anon.: L'Autre Jour (Bamburg Codex)
Anon.: Kyriale Mass IV: Cunctipotens Genitor Deus
Anon.: Kyriale Mass IX: Cum Jubilo
Anon.: Musicalis sciencia / Sciencie laudabili
Anon.: Te Joseph Celebrent
Anon.: Flos Regalis (Worcester Fragments)
Ernoul Caupain: Ler main pensis chevauchai

Ars Nova and the Burgundian School starting tomorrow. I wonder what could be 'Work of the Week'?
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 · (Edited)
Week Two so soon! This week we'll delve into the Ars Nova, other composers born 1300-1399, and the Burgundian School.

Our 'Work of the Week' is no surprise:

Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
Guillaume de Machaut: Messe de Notre Dame

My preferred version is the same as SanAntone:



Machaut: Messe de Notre Dame

Andrew Parrott, Taverner Choir, Taverner Consort
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 · (Edited)
Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
Guillaume de Machaut: Messe de Notre Dame

Level 4
Dufay, Guillaume: Missa l'Homme Armé
Guillaume de Machaut: Douce Dame Jolie

Level 5
Dunstaple, John: Quam Pulchra Es
Dufay, Guillaume: Missa Se La Face Ay Pale
Dufay, Guillaume: Nuper rosarum flores
Landini, Francesco: Ballades inc. Ecco la primavera, Non Ara Ma' Pieta, Sì dolce non sonò chol lir' Orfeo

Dufay, Guillaume: Secular Songs inc. Adieu ces bons vins de Lannoys, Se La Face Ay Pale, Craindre Vous Vueil, Hélas Mon Deuil, a ce Coup- Sui Je Mort, Ce Jour de l'An, Je Languis en Piteux Martire
Guillaume de Machaut: Ma fin est mon commencement


My listening today:



Dufay: Secular Songs (Selected)

The Medieval Ensemble Of London, Peter Davies, Timothy Davies
 

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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Another important composer that was left out by OP - Philippe de Vitry...
Is it Philippe de Vitry you want? I aim to please.

Level 1
No works

Level 2
No works

Level 3
Guillaume de Machaut: Messe de Notre Dame

Level 4
Dufay, Guillaume: Missa l'Homme Armé
Guillaume de Machaut: Douce Dame Jolie

Level 5
Dunstaple, John: Quam Pulchra Es
Dufay, Guillaume: Missa Se La Face Ay Pale
Dufay, Guillaume: Nuper rosarum flores
Landini, Francesco: Ballades inc. Ecco la primavera, Non Ara Ma' Pieta, Sì dolce non sonò chol lir' Orfeo
Dufay, Guillaume: Secular Songs inc. Adieu ces bons vins de Lannoys, Se La Face Ay Pale, Craindre Vous Vueil, Hélas Mon Deuil, a ce Coup- Sui Je Mort, Ce Jour de l'An, Je Languis en Piteux Martire
Guillaume de Machaut: Ma fin est mon commencement

Level 6
Guillaume de Machaut: Le Remède de Fortune
Dunstaple, John: Veni Sancte Spritus
Dufay, Guillaume: Ave Regina Coelorum
Power, Leonel: Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater
Philippe de Vitry: Motets inc. Impudenter circumivi / Virtutibus
Seuse, Heinrich: In Dulce Jubilo
Guillaume de Machaut: Le Livre du Voir Dit
Dufay, Guillaume: Missa Ave Regina Coelorum
Philippe de Vitry: Roman de Fauvel Motets
Guillaume de Machaut: Felix Virgo / Inviolata / Ad Te Suspiramus
Oswald von Wolkenstein: Es Fuegt Sich
Dunstaple, John: Gloria in Canon
Dufay, Guillaume: Supremum est Mortalibus Bonum
Busnoys, Antoine: In Hydraulis
Busnoys, Antoine: Missa l'Homme Armé


My listening today:



Dunstaple: Veni Sancte Spiritus
Power Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater

Hilliard Ensemble



Guillaume de Machaut: Remede de Fortune

Ensemble Ars Nova Project



Guillaume de Machaut: Le Livre du Voir Dit

Orlando Consort



Philippe de Vitry: Le Roman de Fauvel

Joel Cohen



Philippe de Vitry: Motets

Orlando Consort
 
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