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If he wants to do full operas he needs more space for later eras. In the almost three hours of one Mozart opera one can cover samples from all kinds of chant and early (Notre Dame) organum, almost 700 years from ~500-1200
This is roughly how they do it on a 6 disc Medieval set I have from harmonia mundi (I think they boosted it to 8 discs later on). Two discs of monodic chant and one with early polyphony; admittedly they all run to 75-77 min each, so closer to 4 hours.
 

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I listened to Viderunt omnes by Leonin and Perotin as well as the latters Sederunt principes from the "Music of the Gothic Era" on Archiv (Munrow cond. Early Music Consort of London, rec. 1975) and while I can appreciate the "shock value" of additional voices, I think the unaccompanied "base chant" sounds more beautiful, and I am not a huge fan of chant. I should probably listen to the chant disc from my Harmonia mundi anthology to get some notion of the difference of the chant types and maybe also listen to the version of Viderunt omnes (Peres) included there.
 

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I don't think Handel is served well by some of the "hits" like Arrival of the Queen etc. I also personally don't care for that harp concerto (or the organ version) although admittedly the sound with muted strings and recorders is somewhat special. I think it's better to listen to e.g. the first 4 concerti of op.6 or a few organ concerti to get more variety (similar with the keyboard suites)
A bunch of rather underrated pieces that deserved to be as well known as the water music are the 3 concerti a due cori.

Israel in Egypt is an uneven piece but has some really great choruses.

Acis and Galatea was one of Handel's greatest hit until far into the 19th century as both Mozart and Mendelssohn made arrangements of it for performances. It's a very nice piece, very pastoral, almost pre-Mozartian rococo, without lengths but rather modest in almost any scope (length, drama, emotion) compared to the more "serious" operas or oratorios. My favorite part is the choir "Wretched lovers... behold the monster Polypheme" with it's "break" from the lament to the more dramatic warning.
 

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And Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit is so full of joy, it's bound to slap a smile on your face.
Especially:
Bestelle dein Haus, denn du wirst sterben und nicht lebendig bleiben. [Get your house in order because you will die and not remain alive]
Es ist der alte Bund: Mensch, du musst sterben! [It is the old covenant: man, you must die!]

It's a great cantata, but the first part is rather gloomy...
 

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Maybe we can agree about this: the main consumers of AoF were and are people who are interested in counterpoint. Not a mass market, in other words. The cantatas, including Wachet auf, were written for a large middle brow popular target market, basically anyone and everyone whose bum landed on a pew, and the market has remained pretty well unchanged since the 18th century -- albeit now spotify replaces the church.
So there were hundreds of churches in Leipzig vying for customers so everyone could listen to the cantatas they were best pleased with? I am afraid there is no analogy with spotify whatsoever. There wasn't a market. Bach was a civil servant with a fixed income and the congregation could have done very little if they hadn't like his church music.

To the contrary, the few published works like Clavierübung (of which AoF might have been the 5th part in a sense, as some scholars claimed) were something one could purchase although the tiny market for this kind of music in print was hardly comparable with mass media in the 20th (or even printed music in the 19th century).
 

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I always found Gluck's Orpheus a bit boring and the two Iphigenie operas, especially Iphigenie en Tauride more impressive and dramatic. I have not a lot of love for Donizetti (never really explored his serious operas) but L'elisir d'amore is very entertaining, especially on stage. Again, I don't care enough for many operas without the stage experience.
 

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Not sure I have heard more than a piece or two by Seixas in a mixed recital. The composer that deserves some attention is Padre Soler some of whose sonatas are really wonderful (Fandango is fun although maybe not by him, there is one fandango like sonata but I don't remember the number) and the chamber music (early classical keyboard trios/quartets) quite nice.

Now, I am great Haydn fan but this looks like a confusing mess and way too many pieces to digest for a decent impression of early Haydn. I'd rather recommend on fewer pieces, for early-middly (until mid-late 1770s)

symphonies: 6 (7,8), 21 or 22, 26, 31, 44-49, 54, 60, 63, 70, 73 (last 3 probably too late but mentioned further above)
quartets: op.1/3 (or 1/1, just one of the early divertimenti to get the difference to the later works), 9/4, 17/5 or 6, 20/2-4, (33/1+3)
piano sonatas: c minor and A flat major (agrees with above)
cello concerto #1
 

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I think the commonality with Rossini is not specifically Mozart, but common late 18th century opera buffa that will be similar in Cimaros, Salieri and others.
The following generation, like Hoffmann, were obsessed with Don Giovanni because this was the archetypal "Byronic hero", unrepentant even in the face of supernatural justice. And the darker eroticism (Did he do Anna, was it forced? the obssession of the dumped Elvira etc.) compared to the apparently more harmless flirtation games of Cosi and Figaro appealed to them as well. Similarly, the music is not pure buffa but has both the dark hell/commendatore music and the more opera seria style arias by Elvira, Anna and Ottavio.
Mozart mixed genres in all Da Ponte operas and in both German Singspiel operas (the most diverse and daring mix is Magic flute that has Seria arias (the Queen), Buffa (the ensembles), Viennese Singspiel comedy (Papageno), Masonic Music, chorales (Priests, genies, Armed men). It still needed another generation and a few seminal works (especially Freischütz) to establish a German opera that was not merely aping French or Italian or such a unique mix as Magic Flute.
 

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On a side note: I've neither seen nor heard Die Entführung aus dem Serail, but one of my pals in my opera-going gang spoke of a local production he saw that was surprising and extremely entertaining. It's not the next Mozart opera I'm dying to see -- Figaro and Don G probably are atop that list -- but I'd certainly go to see it if I were in a city where it was on stage.
It's entertaining and rather brief and straightforward (compared with the intricate cabals of the Da Ponte). It also has a surprising twist about the "bad guy". Like other cases, many listeners don't like spoken (German) dialogue between the music (very understandable on records) and that's probably also a reason why it seems far more popular in Germany/Austria than internationally. The story is also a bit silly at times, an important role is speaking only, and there is a 10 min opera seria coloratura aria with concertante woodwinds in what's otherwise mostly a singspiel (although quite elaborate overall and in instrumentation) that really sticks out (while I think that the two arias of the Queen in the Magic Flute don't to such an extent because the Queen is obviously a special character) My odd favorite is the pseudo-archaic "crusader's serenade" ("Im Morgenland gefangen war").
It's justified that people, especially newcomers focus on Magic flute and the three Da Ponte but Idomeneo and Entführung are mature and important operas that should not be ignored (while Schauspieldirektor and Clemenza can be safely left for much later).
 

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What is wrong with buying a ticket for a normal "public" theater? ;)
One of the few directors even weirder than Kosky, Calixto Bieito (someone who as apparently a sexual trauma or fetish that makes Almodovar appear sane) let the Abduction take place in a brothel (Berlin, Komische Oper). While it was not entirely exotic fun in the 1780s as until the early 19th century there was a very real threat that a ship's passage in the Mediterranean or even the Bay of Biscay could end up on a North African Slave market and eventually in a Serail, the opera mostly makes fun of it and it also has the inversion cliché that the men (who try to free the women from the Serail) are completely useless (despite the blustering incompetence of the warden Osmin they fail) and the only capable person seems the female servant/companion Blonde. Bieito definitely made the piece far more serious and brutal than intended and it works quite well as "harmless" comic opera.
I personally don't have any problems with the spoken dialogue on stage if overall done well. There are several great operas (Entführung, Flute, Fidelio, Freischütz, Carmen) with this form and it is still used in musicals. Secco recitative seems far stranger than just spoken words without any music until one gets used to it.
 

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I think it's fair to say that operas are perhaps over represented in the listings, or certainly more highly recommended in comparison with other forms of music. I'm not sure why that is but it certainly seems to be a consistent trend.
While there are a few more operas, it is hardly surprising that most recommendations will focus on the "Big Six" (Idomeneo, Entführung, Cosi, Figaro, Giovanni, Zauberflöte) and among them the three last mentioned will dominate. Whereas recommendations for symphonies or especially piano concertos, string quartets, sonatas will be distributed among a few more works (although the symphonies would also be dominated by 5-8 works). Another point is that some listeners will find Mozart symphonies in the history of the genre "superseded" by Beethoven and later composers whereas almost nobody will think like that about the major operas.
 

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The Unfinished is, well, unfinished and the "Great" is a rather divisive piece that is frequently found both among people's absolutely favorite symphonies and among "sacred cows" whose popularity is hard to fathom.
As for the "Trout", I think there is largely consensus that while a charming piece, it is not quite up there with the last three quartets, string quintet, late piano music and trios.
 

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There is an extended sketch of the scherzo of the b minor and a two movement symphony was unthinkable for Schubert who doggedly stuck to traditional forms (unlike late Beethoven), even most of his "Fantasies" are quite sonata-like. And even a hypothetical 2-movement b minor symphony could not have ended in E major in the 1820s, it had to be b minor or B major (like Beethoven's last sonata c minor -> C major) The idea that Schubert's b minor or Bruckner's 9th are "perfect in their fragmentary form" is a 20th century confabulation. (For the belated premiere of the b minor in the 1860s they played the finale from the 3rd symphony to achieve a sense of closure, D major being close to b minor.) I am not sure but the first composer who ended symphonies (or similar multi-movement works) away from home key or parallel might have been Mahler!
Nothing against fragments, I agree that the Schubert b minor (and Reliquie) as well as Bruckner's 9th deserve their fame, but one should still be aware of their fragmentary character.
 

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You're not wrong. Schubert did like to write in a style where the development of the piece happens gradually (and, maybe, endlessly). Brahms is similar in many ways . . . very complex, very nuanced, very lonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnng.
With very few exceptions (first Sextet, early B major trio, A major piano quartet) Brahms is quite different from Schubert; very far from the broad and "loose" way of Schubert, far less melodic, almost never as long and usually much more dense and terse. Brahms also continues the expansion of development over all parts of a movement whereas Schubert often just expands his melodies with little development.

In any case, it can help to listen to recordings of Schubert's very long late works that skip repeats and don't exaggerate the broadness by taking slowish tempi.
 

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Yeah, I like Schubert and Brahms, but don't exactly love them either. There's some pieces from both which I've played on piano, and I do love PLAYING them, but . . . .

I view my own comment with great suspicion: Schubert died before Brahms was even born. The genres in which they composed were decades apart.
I do think that there is some Schubertian influence on Brahms who certainly appreciated a lot of Schubert's music (I think he called one of the "Suleika" songs (to the East/West wind, don't remember which one) the most beautiful song of all), but comparatively restricted and rarely in the "expansiveness". As a relative beginner I tended to find Brahms too dense and unmelodic and some Schubert too long and "eventless".

The great short instrumental pieces by Schubert are Moments musicaux, Klavierstücke etc.
 

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Yes, that was 30 years ago and I love most of Brahms and Schubert. And to be fair, I liked quite a bit almost immediately at about 17, if not quite as much as Beethoven or Mozart. E.g. I loved the "Unfinished" right away, and probably Death & maiden as well (but this might have been a year or two later). The famous piece I was disappointed with, was the "Great C major" and I still think it is a piece that can be tiring or boring in some interpretations.

As already said, Schubert wrote 100s of lieder and a bunch of shortish piano pieces that might help to get used to some aspects of his style. Even Winterreise, Die schoene Muellerin and a few dozen of the best know and most frequently anthologized lieder should keep you busy for a while. If you like choral music, check out "Gesang der Geister über den Wassern", a truly magical piece.
The late music has to be taken on its own terms. It is not Beethoven (although Beethoven looms large in a few works like the Death&Maiden, the trios and the c minor piano sonata). The breadth, the relative looseness, the focus on melody (with some important exceptions) are very different. Schubert often also tends to put things side by side rather than "develop", take the sharp contrasts of the middle sections in the slow movements of the string quintet or the sonata D 959.

I'd focus on a small number of works that have at least some immediate appeal and listen repeatedly. Or put it aside for a while. Nowadays late Schubert is as revered as late Beethoven by some listeners but it was not always like that. Even in the mid-20th century the piano sonatas were kind of niche repertoire.
 

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I find "Lobgesang" not entirely successful. He should have split this into a real instrumental symphony and a more compact cantata without such a long instrumental "prelude". I wouldn't recommend this for getting to know the composer. OTOH it is shorter than Elija and St. Paul... ;) and choral works are a major part of Mendelssohn's oeuvre.

The reason for the messed up numbering is that Mendelssohn was not happy with the "Reformation", so it was published only posthumously and that he revised the #4, thus having the final version (AFAIK not considerably different) published later.
 
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