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the thing with sibelius is the unevenness.he undoubtedly produced great music, but i sincerely doubt any of his works was able to sustain high quality until the end. so we should cherish the great moments in his music: violin cto, finlandia, the swan of tuonela, Symphonies 2 and 7, tapiola, the wood-nymph, pelleas and melisande
 

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Discussion Starter · #862 · (Edited)
I guess it's Saturday somewhere in the World.

We recently had a couple of weeks with an extraordinarily large number of highly recommended works. Well, this week, we have the opposite. The same number of recommended works but relatively few in the top levels. A chance to appreciate the work of composers who might otherwise get lost in the deluge from those more famous or prolific.

Composers born 1866-1871. If you're following along, enjoy!

Level 1
No works

Level 2
Satie, Erik: Trois Gymnopédies

Level 3
Satie, Erik: Gnossiennes

Level 4
Scriabin, Alexander: Symphony No. 4 "The Poem of Ecstasy"
Scriabin, Alexander: Prometheus "Poem of Fire"
Scriabin, Alexander: 24 Preludes, Op.11 esp. Part III: No 13 in G-flat major
Granados, Enrique: Goyescas-Suite esp. 1.Los Requiebros
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 9 "Black Mass"
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 8
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 2 "Sonata-Fantasy"

Joplin, Scott: Maple Leaf Rag

Level 5
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 10
Roussel, Albert: Symphony No. 3, Op. 42
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 5
Scriabin, Alexander: Etude No. 12 in D-sharp Minor Op. 8
Granados, Enrique: Danzas Esapnolas esp. No. 1, No. 2
Busoni, Ferruccio: Piano Concerto in C Major

Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 4
Satie, Erik: Three Pear-shaped Pieces
Satie, Erik: Parade
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 7 "White Mass"
Beach, Amy: "Gaelic" Symphony
Roussel, Albert: Bacchus et Ariadne
Scriabin, Alexander: Etudes Op. 42 No. 5
Busoni, Ferruccio: Doktor Faust
Satie, Erik: Sonatine Bureaucratique
Scriabin, Alexander: Etude in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 2 No. 1

Level 6
Beach, Amy: Piano Quintet in F-sharp Minor Op. 67
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: Lyric Symphony
Beach, Amy: Romance for Violin and Piano
Satie, Erik: Vexations
Satie, Erik: Socrate
Satie, Erik: Je te Veux
Beach, Amy: Violin Sonata
Joplin, Scott: Gladiolus Rag
Scriabin, Alexander: Four Pieces Op. 51
Scriabin, Alexander: Nocturne!
Scriabin, Alexander: Ver La Flamme
Lekeu, Guillaume: Violin Sonata in G
Alfvén, Hugo: Swedish Rhapsody No. 1 "Midsummer Vigil"
Beach, Amy: Piano Concerto Op. 45
Busoni, Ferruccio: Fantasia Contrappuntistica
Roussel, Albert: Le Festin de l'Ariagnée
Roussel, Albert: Symphony No. 4
Satie, Erik: Dessicated Embryos
Pfitzner, Hans: Palestrina
Satie, Erik: Pieces Froides
Lehár, Franz: Gold and Silver

Level 7
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: String Quartet No. 2
Scriabin, Alexander: Symphony No. 3
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 3
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: String Quartet No. 4
Alfvén, Hugo: Symphony No. 4 "Från Havsbandet"
Kalinnikov, Vasily: Symphony No. 1
Scriabin, Alexander: Symphony No. 2
Scriabin, Alexander: Symphony No. 1
Scriabin, Alexander: Piano Sonata No. 6
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: String Quartet No. 3
Alfvén, Hugo: Symphony No. 3
Cilea, Francesco: Adriana Lecouvreur
Scriabin, Alexander: The Mysterium inc. Preparation for the Final Mystery
Busoni, Ferruccio: Doctor Faust
Pfitzner, Hans Palestrina
Satie, Erik: Sarabandes
Lekeu, Guillaume: Adagio for Strings
Alfvén, Hugo: Dalecarlian Rhapsody
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: Der Zwerg
Zemlinsky, Alexander von: String Quartet No. 1

Honourable mentions:
Lang, Margaret Ruthven: Irish Love Song
McCunn, Hamish: The Land of the Mountain and the Flood
Monti, Vittorio: Csárdás
Cook, Will Marion: Clorindy, or The Origin of the Cake Walk
Godowsky, Leopold: Triakontameron "Alt Wien"
 

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I think that the Scott Joplin's late opera Treemonisha is wonderful, probably his greatest work in my view. If one can spend some time knowing the composer (the two works on the list gives one less than 10 minutes of his output), I suggest it as the main course. Some of my favorite rags by him that aren't on the above list, and that I recommend, include The Entertainer, The Ragtime Dance, Solace, Pineapple Rag, Magnetic Rag and, above all, Bethena.

 

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The selection represents a really important transition in the history of music. On the one hand, there's the chromaticism and expressiveness of Scriabin and maybe Busoni (I say maybe because I know his music less well). And on the other hand you have early Satie, the Satie of Gnossiennes, which was a real source of inspiration for all the very simple music of the post war -- composers like Cage and Skempton.

I used to be completely addicted to Horowitz's Scriabin -- wonderful music for the car.

There's a lot to enjoy here -- and a challenge too if you're used to the likes of Mozart and Wagner and Sibelius. A good challenge. Very soon there will be an even bigger challenge with Webern etc. which disorients most people at first. Get ready to relish the feeling of air from another planet, as Schoenberg liked to say.
 

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As someone who has long loved Jazz and its antecedents, I appreciate seeing Joplin on there. And maybe a little surprised too, until i remember that I've seen Treemonisha and some of his other works covered in classical music podcasts.

As Mandryka astutely points out, this is certainly an interesting point, right on the cusp of when "classical" becomes a debatable term. And for some (but not me), so does the term "music".

As a big fan of Cage, Glass, Riley, etc, and someone who also loves what I've heard of Satie, I'm very excited for what's to come.
 

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Discussion Starter · #866 ·
An interesting week. Satie divides opinion for me. Some, like Trios Gymnopédies, Gnossiennes, Socrate, and Je Te Veux, I absolutely love. Some, like Parade, I absolutely hate. Scriabin was super-interesting and for the most part, very enjoyable to listen to, and Granados a more than pleasant surprise. I'm not a piano concerto-guy, but that Busoni concerto is outstanding, and I really enjoyed Zemlinsky's Lyric Symphony too, but found Amy Beach a little underwhelming.

We still have a couple of weeks of "post-Romantic" composers to cover-off. I've previously done my best to avoid movements and schools as it causes confusion on who's 'in' for this week and who's 'out' for other weeks. This week though, I'm breaking my self-imposed rule and covering a week of composers associated with the English Pastoral School. Be careful not to step in the cow-pat!

Level 1
No works

Level 2
Holst, Gustav: The Planets
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

Level 3
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Lark Ascending
Delius, Frederick: Brigg Fair

Level 4
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 2 "The London Symphony"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 5
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Fantasia on Greensleeves
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 3 "Pastoral"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 6
Delius, Frederick: Pieces (2) for Small Orchestra “On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring” & “Summer Night on the River”
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 4
Bax, Arnold: Tintagel

Level 5
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: On Wenlock Edge
Holst, Gustav: St. Paul's Suite
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 1 "A Sea Symphony"
Vaughan-Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 7 "Sinfonia Antartica"
Bax, Arnold: Symphony No. 6
Delius, Frederick: Sea Drift
Delius, Frederick: A Village Romeo and Juliet esp. The Walk to the Paradise Garden
Delius, Frederick: A Mass of Life
Finzi, Gerald: Clarinet Concerto
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 9
Bax, Arnold: Symphony No. 3

Level 6
Finzi, Gerald: Cello Concerto
Bax, Arnold: November Woods
Finzi, Gerald: Dies Natalis
Warlock, Peter: Capriol Suite
Ireland, John: Piano Concerto in E-flat
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Job, A Masque for Dancing
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Mass in G Minor
Finzi, Gerald: Eclogue Op. 10
Butterworth, George: The Banks of Green Willow
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Symphony No. 8
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: English Folksong Suite
Butterworth, George: Shropshire Lad
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Serenade to Music
Holst, Gustav: Egdon Heath
Bax, Arnold: Symphony No. 1
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Five Mystical Songs
Bax, Arnold: Symphony No. 5
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Songs of Travel
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: The Wasps
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Tuba Concerto
Bridge, Frank: String Quartet No. 3

Level 7
Finzi, Gerald: Romance in E-Flat Major, Op. 11
Bridge, Frank: Sonata for Piano
Delius, Frederick: Florida Suite
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Five Variants of "Dives and Lazarus"
Holst, Gustav: Second Suite for Military Band
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Norfolk Rhapsody No. 1
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Fantasia on Christmas Carols
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Dona Nobis Pacem
Holst, Gustav: First Suite for Military Band
Quilter, Roger: Three Shakespeare Songs Op. 6 esp. 1. Come Death, Away
Delius, Frederick: Violin Sonata No. 1
Bridge, Frank: Sonata in D Minor for Cello and Piano
Holst, Gustav: The Cloud Messenger
Bantock, Granville: Hebridean Symphony
Holst, Gustav: The Hymn of Jesus
Holst, Gustav: Beni Mora Suite
Delius, Frederick: Eventyr (Once Upon a Time)
Holst, Gustav: Invocation "A Song of the Evening"
Bridge, Frank: Sonata for Violin and Piano
Ireland, John: A Downland Suite
Holst, Gustav: Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda, Op. 26 esp. I. Hymn to the Dawn
Holst, Gustav: Sāvitri
Holst, Gustav: Symphony in F Major "The Cotswolds"
Vaughan Williams, Ralph: Sir John in Love

Hounorable mentions:
Moeran, Ernest John: Serenade in G

I have Hickox, Handley and others to guide me through the top levels:




 

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He rises and begins to round,
He drops the silver chain of sound,
Of many links without a break,
In chirrup, whistle, slur and shake.

For singing till his heaven fills,
'Tis love of earth that he instils,
And ever winging up and up,
Our valley is his golden cup
And he the wine which overflows
to lift us with him as he goes.

Till lost on his aerial rings

In light, and then the fancy sings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #869 · (Edited)
Ready?

Composers born 1873-1875 except Schoenberg, we'll get to him and his friends next week.

Level 1
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18 esp. II. Adagio sostenuto

Level 2
Ravel, Maurice: Boléro
Ravel, Maurice: Daphnis et Chloé Lever du jour
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini esp. Variation 18 (Andante cantabile)
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor
Ravel, Maurice: Piano Concerto in G Major esp. II. Adagio assai

Level 3
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Symphony No. 2
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: "Morceaux de Fantasie" esp. Prelude in C-sharp Minor
Ravel, Maurice: La Valse
Ravel, Maurice: Rapsodie Espagnole
Ravel, Maurice: String Quartet in F esp. II. Assez vif: très rythmé
Ravel, Maurice: Gaspard de la Nuit
Ravel, Maurice: Le Tombeau de Couperin
Ives, Charles: Piano Sonata No. 2 "Concord"

Level 4
Ravel, Maurice: Pavane Pour une Infante Défunte
Ives, Charles: Symphony No. 4
Ravel, Maurice: Ma Mère l'Oye (Ballet)
Ravel, Maurice: Miroirs esp. Alborada del Gracioso No. 4
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: The Isle Of The Dead, Op.29
Ives, Charles: Three Places in New England
Ravel, Maurice: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
Ives, Charles: The Unanswered Question
Ravel, Maurice: Jeux d'Eau
Ives, Charles: Symphony No. 2
Ravel, Maurice: L'Enfant et les Sortilèges
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Vespers "All-Night Vigil", Op.37

Level 5
Ravel, Maurice: Shéhérazade
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Symphonic Dances
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Symphony No. 3
Ravel, Maurice: Piano Trio in A minor Op. 67
Ravel, Maurice: Valse Nobles et Sentimentale
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Symphony No. 1
Ravel, Maurice: Tzigane
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Cello Sonata in G minor, Op.19
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: The Bells, Op.35
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Songs (14) Op.34 esp. No. 14 "Vocalise"
Ravel, Maurice: L'Heure Espagnole
Suk, Josef: Symphony No 2 "Asrael"
Ravel, Maurice: Introduction and Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet, and String Quartet
Reger, Max: Variations and Fugue on a Theme by JA Hiller
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Etudes Tableaux
Ravel, Maurice: Violin Sonata No. 2
Ives, Charles: 114 Songs esp. The Circus Band, General Booth Enters Heaven

Level 6
Schmidt, Franz Symphony No. 4
Ravel, Maurice: Sonatine, M. 40 II. Mouvement de menuet
Glière, Reinhold: Symphony No. 3 op. 42 "Ilya Muromets"
Reger, Max: Four Tone Poems after Arnold Böcklin
Ives, Charles: New England Holidays Symphony
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Piano Concerto No. 1
Ives, Charles: Symphony No. 3 'The Camp Meeting'
Ives, Charles: String Quartet No. 2
Ives, Charles: Central Park in the Dark
Hahn, Reynaldo: Chanson Grises esp. L’heure Exquise
Suk, Josef: Serenade für Strings in E-flat major, Op. 6 esp. III. Adagio
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Variations on a Theme of Corelli
Reger, Max: Piano Concerto in F Minor
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, Op. 31 esp. X. Tebe poem (We praise Thee)
Hahn Reynaldo: Piano Quintet
Reger, Max: Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue in E Minor

Level 7
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: "Elegiac" Piano Trio No. 1
Reger, Max: Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Mozart
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Trio Élégiaque No. 2
Reger, Max: Cello Suites Op. 131 esp. No. 1
Suk, Josef: Summer Tale
Kreisler, Fritz: Liebesleid
Suk, Josef: Zráni
Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel: Song of Hiawatha Hiawatha's Wedding Feast
Rachmaninoff, Sergei: Variations on a Theme by Chopin
Ravel, Maurice: Don Quichotte à Dulcinée
Glière, Reinhold: The Red Poppy
Ives, Charles: Violin Sonata No. 1

Honourable mentions:
Montemezzi, Italo: L'Amore Dei Tre Re
Bersa, Blagoje: Notturno
Handy, William Christopher: The Memphis Blues


Edited to combine and elevate Prelude in C sharp Minor with Morceaux de Fantasie.
 

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You absolutely must listen to Reger's Hiller Variations.

Max Reger - Variationen und Fuge auf ein Thema von J.A.Hiller op.100 - YouTube

By the way, last week I hope you didn't miss Scriabin's nocturne - like the Reger variations, very Brahmsian, get your hankie out to wipe the tear away.

ALEXANDER SCRIABIN - NOCTURNE FOR THE LEFT HAND OPUS 9 No. 2 - ALEXIS WEISSENBERG - YouTube

And while you've got the hankie ready, try Reynaldo Hahn's L’heure Exquise. Ideally you want to hear the composer singing it in Proust's cork lined bedroom, but this will have to do instead

L'Heure exquise - YouTube

I think Ravel's Don Quichotte à Dulcinée is fun enough to be worth a listen now and then

Gérard Souzay: The complete "Don Quichotte à Dulcinée" (Ravel) - YouTube

For some reason I can't explain, I have a soft spot for Ravel's Valses nobles et semtimentales. Pogorelich completely reconstructed and deconstructed it, the performance makes me think of ghosts, and is IMO one which captures the artist on the borderline of sanity and madness. These are the waltzes they danced in that hotel in The Shining.

Ravel: Valses nobles et sentimentales, M. 61 - I. Modéré - très franc - YouTube
 

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If you can understand French it may be of interest to hear Boulez on Hahn -- he was a hater

La composition chez Proust - Littérature française moderne et contemporaine : histoire, critique, théorie (2005-2020) - Collège de France - 02 avril 2013 17:30 (college-de-france.fr)

Verlaine was always crying. There's a story in Rambaud's letters about how, when they were living in London, Verlaine sent him out to Chapel Street market in Islington to buy some herrings. Rambaud came back with mackerel. Result -- endless tears.
 

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I love l'Heure Exquise. I read somewhere that when Verlaine first heard it, he cried.
Reynaldo Hahn is a major composer and I love every work he has written for instruments or voices. Although he was born in Venezuela i consider him to be a French composer, conductor, music critic and singer. There are interesting recent discoveries in his work.
 

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Last week's RVW wasn't my favorite. Wasn't too into his Symphony 5. Brigg Fair was and the RVW tone poems were more my speed.

But this week I'm really enjoying Ravel and Rach. I'd not previously listened to much Rach -- good stuff! Piano Concerto 2 was awesome! And with Ravel, I'd only known Bolero and Le Tombeau de Couperin (one of my all-time faves! It has that same sort of off-kilter danciness that reminds me of what I love in some post-1977 punk/alternative/art rock). Daphnis et Chloe didn't disappoint. Got a lot left ahead of me, including those works by Ives, which I've been meaning to get into since stumbling across a TC thread about his work here: Charles Ives Orchestral Works
 

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Discussion Starter · #876 ·
Last week's RVW wasn't my favorite. Wasn't too into his Symphony 5. Brigg Fair was and the RVW tone poems were more my speed.

But this week I'm really enjoying Ravel and Rach. I'd not previously listened to much Rach -- good stuff! Piano Concerto 2 was awesome! And with Ravel, I'd only known Bolero and Le Tombeau de Couperin (one of my all-time faves! It has that same sort of off-kilter danciness that reminds me of what I love in some post-1977 punk/alternative/art rock). Daphnis et Chloe didn't disappoint. Got a lot left ahead of me, including those works by Ives, which I've been meaning to get into since stumbling across a TC thread about his work here: Charles Ives Orchestral Works
Personally, I preferred Ives' Symphony No 2 to No. 4. The Concord Piano Sonata is interesting listening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #877 · (Edited)
I still have some listening to do from this week's list. Finishing off Rachmaninov today, and turning to complete Ives tomorrow, I'll have got down to his String Quartet No. 2 in Level 6. Some great listening. Ravel blows a little hot and cold for me, but Rachmaninov has surprised me, in a positive way, and the Suk and Schmidt symphonies were delightful.

I'll be travelling tomorrow and Saturday, and am unsure of internet accessibility at our destination (likely to become a thing over coming weeks), so am posting up next week's listing early. Composers born 1876-1879, plus all associated with the Second Viennese School. My limited experience suggests I may find some of what's to come a little challenging but I'm approaching it all with an open mind.

Level 1
No works

Level 2
Berg, Alban: Violin Concerto

Level 3
Schoenberg, Arnold: Verklärte Nacht
Berg, Alban: Wozzeck
Schoenberg, Arnold: Pierrot Lunaire
Berg, Alban: Lyric Suite
Respighi, Ottorino: Pines of Rome
de Falla, Manuel: El Sombrero de Tres Picos

Level 4
Schoenberg, Arnold: Chamber Symphony No. 1
Schoenberg, Arnold: Five Pieces for Orchestra
Webern, Anton von: Symphonie Op. 21
Webern, Anton von: Passacaglia for Orchestra
de Falla, Manuel: El Amor Brujo esp. Ritual Fire Dance'
Canteloube, Joseph: Chants d'Auvergne, Vol. 1 esp. No. 2. Bailero
de Falla, Manuel: Noches en los Jardines de España
Respighi, Ottorino: Fountains of Rome
Webern, Anton von: Six Pieces for Orchestra
Schoenberg, Arnold: Gurrelieder

Level 5
Schoenberg, Arnold: Variations for Orchestra
Berg, Alban: Piano Sonata No. 1 esp. Mässigbe wegt
Schoenberg, Arnold: String Quartets esp. No. 2, No. 3, No. 4
Schoenberg, Arnold: Klavierstücke Three Piano Pieces Op 11
Webern, Anton von: String Quartet Op. 28
Berg, Alban: Lulu
Schoenberg, Arnold: Moses und Aron
Schoenberg, Arnold: A Survivor from Warsaw
Schoenberg, Arnold: Violin Concerto
Berg, Alban: Three Pieces for Orchestra
Ruggles, Carl: Sun-Treader
Webern, Anton von: Five Pieces for Orchestra Op. 10
Schoenberg, Arnold: Erwartung
Webern, Anton von: Variations for Orchestra
Respighi, Ottorino: The Birds
Schoenberg, Arnold: Pelleas und Melisande
de Falla, Manuel: La Vida Breve
Schoenberg, Arnold: Five Piano Pieces Op. 23

Level 6
Schoenberg, Arnold: Piano Concerto
Dohnányi, Ernö von: Piano Quintet No. 1
Berg, Alban: String Quartet
Respighi, Ottorino: Feste Romane
Schoenberg, Arnold: Suite for Piano Op. 25
de Falla, Manuel: Harpsichord Concerto
Webern, Anton von: Six Bagatelles for String Quartet
Webern, Anton von: Concerto for Nine Instruments
Schoenberg, Arnold: Die Glückliche Hand
Berg, Alban: Chamber Concerto
Schoenberg, Arnold: Trio for Strings Op. 45
Webern, Anton von: Variations for Piano
Respighi, Ottorino: Ancient Airs and Dances
Berg, Alban: Altenberger Lieder
Webern, Anton von: Cantata No. 2
Brian, Havergal: Symphony No. 1 "Gothic"
Respighi, Ottorino: Trittico Botticelliano
Dohnányi, Ernö von: Variations on a Nursery Song
Carpenter, John Alden: Adventures in a Perambulator
Berg, Alban: Der Wein
de Falla, Manuel: Suite Populaire Espagnole d'Après Siete Canciones Populares
Schoenberg, Arnold: Six Little Piano Pieces Op. 19

Level 7
Webern, Anton von: Five Pieces for String Quartet
Berg, Alban: Kammerkonzert
Respighi, Ottorino: Church Windows
Dohnányi, Ernö von: String Quartet No. 2
Webern, Anton von: Langsamer Satz
Schoenberg, Arnold: Das Buch der Hángenden Gärten
Wolf-Ferrari, Ermano: Chamber Symphony
Respighi, Ottorino: Violin Sonata
Schrecker, Franz: Der Ferne Klang
Webern, Anton von: Three Little Pieces for Cello and Piano
Webern, Anton von: Cantata No. 1
Webern, Anton von: String Trio
Schoenberg, Arnold: Wind Quartet
Schoenberg, Arnold: Ode to Napoleon
Webern, Anton von: Das Augenlicht
Carpenter, John Alden: Sky-Scapers
Schoenberg, Arnold: Serenade
Schoenberg, Arnold: Suite Op. 29
Schoenberg, Arnold: Die Jakobsleiter

Honourable mentions:
Wieniawski, Regine "Poldowski": 14 Songs to the Texts by Paul Verlaine
 

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I agree with your assessment of last week. Rach was unfailingly tuneful and engaging. Whereas Ravel was more variable for me. Still, I love some Ravel greatly. So no slight on him. As for Ives: The Piano Sonata 2 "Concord," unfortunately, was not my cup of tea. I'll try again with Ives sometime in the future.

I've long been intrigued by the prospect of this week's era. I've certainly heard the names of Berg and Schoenberg as they loom large over modern music. But this may be the first time I've consciously listened to any. And with bonus new names in Respighi and Da Falla!

So far, I've enjoyed the top recommended Berg and Schoenberg Violin Concertos. Currently listening to Wozzeck. Wasn't expecting to enjoy it as much as I do! Not top of my opera lists, but also something I wouldn't mind listening to again and hopefully seeing in person. Reminds me of the few bits of Brecht and Weil that I've heard over the years, and in a good way. (I have a vague, faint memory that my high school's theater group also performed an english adaptation of Woyzeck, and I remember being impressed by and enjoying the unabashed oddity of that production, but I don't remember much else.)
 
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