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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
Especially the throw-ins and the allusions like the Tango Argentino or the "Alle meine Entchen" (all my little ducklings)
Thank you Alex. I just wanted to highlight this part of your comment because I'd never even heard of Alle meine Entchen, and I just now looked it up and it's not familiar to me at all. I always find it fascinating what listeners bring with them to the music when they listen.

As for motivic consistency, the work as a whole is materially bound together by a set of key motifs and figures. My view of musical atmosphere is perhaps different from yours. For me atmosphere is a fundamental emanation of the Idea, the first principle after which the work is created, that contains everything, contradictions and all. I don't know if that explanation makes any sense; it's something I've been meaning to write about at length for some time now, but I'm not able to get stuck into that kind of project right now.
 

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Yes, it's always interesting what other people hear in the compositions, also if the intention was quite different ;)

I was reminded of "Alle meine Entchen" a couple of times, for example at 41:35 - but of course it can happen that a short phrase like this is already contained in another piece in a similar way.

Was the allusion to Tango Argentino intentional, or also my personal interpretation?

It seems obvious that our approach to music is quite different, but that's very interesting for me! I started composing with a completely inspiration-driven approach, but now I try integrating more structure after getting more theoretical knowledge. But I also don't want to lose all of the inspirational impulses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
Was the allusion to Tango Argentino intentional, or also my personal interpretation?
I think that's yours as well! The only real dance in that piece is the waltz, and I always think of the thing as a whole as kind of like a giant scherzo. As far as quotations go, the only one I put in the entire thing is the first few notes of the Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin.

It seems obvious that our approach to music is quite different, but that's very interesting for me! I started composing with a completely inspiration-driven approach, but now I try integrating more structure after getting more theoretical knowledge. But I also don't want to lose all of the inspirational impulses.
My work is very much driven by inspiration. I don't have any formal training or logic, there's only intuition. But I do think a lot about what I've done after the fact, and I've drawn some conclusions that could be considered philosophical or academic. I am not philosophical or academic when I compose, though I sometimes approach the start of a new piece that way, and I have to rid myself of those thoughts before I can really begin to work. I've never gotten very far with a piece that I tried to compose in accordance with any theory, whatever it happened to be.
 

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I like your inspiration-driven work I've heard so far! I guess that's maybe because I'm composing somewhere between pure inspirational, and formally recommendable. I think the studied composers would say that I'm still relying quite a lot on intuition ;)

I try to improve my structural weaknesses, but I also don't want to disregard all my inspirations. I think the inspirations are one of the main aspects to make music personal and unique.
 
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