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It's funny how one eventually comes around to music once abhorred but I've been listening some different metal bands since last summer. Portnoy era Dream Theater, Cathedral, a bit of Megadeth, and I just discovered the Russian band, Abysskvlt. I think I'm basically a doomer. I don't like the fast and furious stuff. I have no taste for the fast drumming or speedy guitar solos which is why I can't totally warm up to DT. But they do have some great songs when they're not wanking away. I love heavy riffs and good vocal melodies. I love Cathedral.
 
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Looks like I posted on this thread almost 7 years ago. Time sure flies...

My taste in music can be boiled down to the following attributes (no particular order): very high level of musicianship, complexity, deep and broad levels of emotional and/or intellectual content, lack of repetitiveness, avoidance of verse>chorus>bridge song format, avoidance of simple 'hooks'. I didn't make a conscious choice to only like music with these attributes, but over the years, that's where my tastes ended up. Music that does not have these attributes, tends to bore me.

Within the above list of attributes, I am somewhat style or genre agnostic. As long as music has most or all of the above attributes, it's style is not as important.

With that being said, the various genres* of music I listen to, all have most or all of the above attributes. Progressive-metal, technical-metal, metal-fusion, avant-garde metal, all fit the above attributes. So for me, the metal sounding instrumentation is kind of secondary to those other attributes I mentioned above. The metal guitars, drums, vocals, etc, are the style that sort of sits on the surface of underlying complexity and sophistication of the music. I do not listen to the above subgenres of metal because they are metal, but because they have most of those criteria I mentioned above.

*the other genres of music that fit the criteria that I love in music are:

Classical - 20th century, avant-garde, modernism, serial, atonal
Jazz - fusion, post-bop, chamber jazz, avant-garde, M-Base
Prog - avant-prog, Canterbury, Zeuhl, classic era prog,
 

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Complexity without great songs doesn't cut it for me. A band like Haken can play great but the songs are okay. A band that deserves more exposure is District 97. Those kids are amazing! They write great songs with killer riffs and plenty of complexity to satisfy the prog nerds. And their lead singer is great. And she's beautiful as well.
 
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LOL.

There was a time when I liked some Heavy Metal, but that was the late 60s and early 70s. That music, while very heavy at the time, hardly measures up to the doom and sturm and Metal of today. I hate "metal" vocals, or whatever they call that.

Yeah, I'm talkin' early Iron Butterfly and Uriah Heep. Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin.


 

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39 years ago, this week, I was watching Thin Lizzy's last ever UK gig at the Reading Festival. RIP Phil Lynott. 🎸 :cry:



I won't mention the abomination of having to suffer Ian Gillan singing Sabbath songs. Some things are better left unsaid. The epic plastic bottle fights before and during the Anvil or Hanoi Rocks sets is the stuff of legend. 🍾:LOL:
 

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Quite surprised to find a heavy metal thread here!
There's been multiple, some more civil than others. There's a surprising amount of overlap between classical and heavy metal fans. I suspect it has something to do with both fostering a kind of outsiders' mentality that's open to atypical musical experience that aren't readily found in popular culture. There are some other abstract similarities, from both often valuing high levels of musicianship to both tending towards forms more complex than typical pop song forms, especially when it comes to progressive metal and its off-shoots. Plus, I think more than any other popular genre metal also tends to aim for a kind of "epic, grand" aesthetic that was endemic in classical music especially of the romantic and post-romantic/early-modern eras.
 

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ive been reading various threads on this forum and it seems that heavy metal is held in little regard, yet I notice Hip Hop seems to be held in high regard. I find this interesting that such bands that appeal to me within the heavy metal spectrum such as Lost Horizon, Opeth or the heavily classically influenced Nightwish and Rhapsody of Fire, would be seen as some kind of inferior music when placed against Hip Hop. I used to exclusively listen to Hip Hop in my teens, then, I hate to say it, I somewhat grew out of it and gravitated towards power metal, which then actually got in to other genres of heavy metal, as well as classical music itself.

So my question is as this thread is titled, is there very little appreciation out there for metal bands or have people just not explored the heavy metal genre and its sub genres in any great depth?
Hip Hop love? Where? 🧐 I've tried with a dedicated thread but got little no response. Doesn't kill my love for it but it's pointless posting where's little interest.

Not a big metal fan but I can appreciate the musicianship of the more melodic instrumental stuff:

 

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Not a big metal fan but I can appreciate the musicianship of the more melodic instrumental stuff:

Holy Wars is one of my favorite songs to play on guitar. Very demanding to play up to speed. There's a handful of instrumental metal bands, more recently than there used to be. One example:

 

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I have yet to hear metal that is sophisticated and well written and not overly technical.
Sophisticated and technical tend to go together... not sure where the line for "overly technical" is. "Well-written" is really vague without specifics. Metal is a large genre with dozens of sub-genres and thousands of artists from all over the world. If you don't like any of it then there's a good chance it's the more superficial aspects you aren't a fan of, which is fine since the genre is the very definition of an acquired taste... but so is classical.
 

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Here's some examples of what I'd call "sophisticated" metal, but in different ways:

Structural and harmonic sophistication:

Rhythmic sophistication:

Lyric sophistication (and more rhythmic sophistication):

Melodic... well, I don't know how sophisticated it is, but the melodies are very sticky:

These examples also cover four very different sub-genres: classic progressive metal, "djent," alternative metal, power metal. There's other metal genres quite different from these as well.

Now, it's all relative of course. I'm not claiming the kind of sophistication found in the most sophisticated jazz or classical; but by popular music standards? Yes, much of this is very sophisticated. I'd even suggest that rhythmically metal doesn't take a back seat in sophistication to much of any music. The fact that are metal drummers out there capable of playing 3-4 different time signatures with different limbs is extraordinary.
 

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I picked up Eternal Blue by Spiritbox. They combine pop vocal melodies with metal riffs.
 

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I will check out Spiritbox some day. I'm all for old school death metal these days. Even had a short chat with Karl Willetts of Bolt Thrower/Memoriam on facebook. He is really cool it seems :)
 

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39 years ago, this week, I was watching Thin Lizzy's last ever UK gig at the Reading Festival. RIP Phil Lynott. 🎸 :cry:

I won't mention the abomination of having to suffer Ian Gillan singing Sabbath songs. Some things are better left unsaid. The epic plastic bottle fights before and during the Anvil or Hanoi Rocks sets is the stuff of legend. 🍾:LOL:
I was there too!
I remember they played O Fortuna from Carmina Burana on the PA between sets.
Didn't Sabbath have a silly Stone Henge Set? Was it the inspiration for the one in Spinal Tap?
And was it Steel Pulse who never came on because the audience kept throwing plastic bottles at the stage because they didn't like reggae?
 

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I think a steel Pulse lasted a song and a half which I was gutted about cos I loved them. And yes Sabbath had that silly stonehenge set. I've seen every incarnation of Sabbath live but Gillan was the worst. He murdered the old songs and the new material was utter garbage. Doing Smoke on the Water as an encore was too much fir anyone to take. Most embarrassed I've ever been at a gig, ever.
 

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It's funny how one eventually comes around to music once abhorred but I've been listening some different metal bands since last summer. Portnoy era Dream Theater, Cathedral, a bit of Megadeth, and I just discovered the Russian band, Abysskvlt. I think I'm basically a doomer. I don't like the fast and furious stuff. I love Cathedral.
I'm guessing you'll find more current or former metalheads here than any other nonclassical genre. I'm not sure why, but Eva Yojimbo proffered a very good theory.

Starthrower, I used to really be into Dream Theater. Saw them 2X and John Petrucci a couple times (once a guitarist, always a guitarist, I guess). I liked Metropolis Pt.2. After a while, I just got sick of it all. It all sounded like endless note-spinning without any purpose. Technically, it's impressive; musically, not so much. That's just my opinion. Again, my opinion; if you disagree I respect your opinion as well. More than anything( nonclassical), I like a good song, and Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Scorpions, etc. put out good songs in their heyday, which just happened to be heavy. In the 80's I got into Yngwie, bought a Strat and Marshall, and tried to copy him. After a while, I realized it's just endless note-spinning and nearly every solo sounded exactly the same. He's admitted it. He said he worked on a few patterns in the harmonic minor scale, which is unusual for standard rock, some arpeggios, and diminished figures, and he just varies them a little bit, depending on the song. I think Dream Theater is somewhat held back by their lead singer, James Labrie(??). Maybe he has a good voice and range, but the quality of his voice really wears on me after a while.

Having said all that ^ ^, I was fortunate enough to see Maiden on their Powerslave tour, Priest in the early-mid 80's, the Scorpions on their Love at First Sting tour, and many more. I saw Deep Purple 2X on their 1st two comeback albums with the classic Mark II lineup. I was fortunate to get backstage and briefly meet Ritchie Blackmore. Bad Company opened, and I went back to their hotel with them and a bunch of other people. Suffice it to say a certain white powder was flowing as freely and casually as water. LOL!

Merl., I'm jealous you got to see Thin Lizzy with Phil. There's a lot more to that band than The Boys Are Back in Town, but most, nearly all, Americans don't know it. Cheers!

Again, just my opinion. We can disagree without being disagreeable, right?
 
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