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I'm looking to improve on what I can write, and also to change my style a bit, I feel as though I am in a rut, and do not know how to get out of it, and I thought here might be the best place to ask. So, how do I go about improving on what I can do? I already write, and improvise a good deal, I also listen a good deal to composers I'd like to sound like, or that have ideas that I like as well.
 

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take passages written by other composers and alter the counterpoint, melody, harmony, orchestration, rhythm or whatever so as to barely disguise it......

No joke, this is the best way to absorb the voice or technique of other composers. Everyone is afraid of 'stealing' or copyright infringement and thinks resemblance to another composer or source material is some kind of mortal sin, but mimicry is the only real way to learn anything, it's the way the great composers learned and in my view there won't be any more unless people practice it.
 

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It's really not an easy question to answer (that's why you've gotten so few replies) and I really feel that I must start by stating the "obvious" and that is: all composers want to become better.

So you've already written, but are you self taught or did you ever had a composition teacher? Somebody actually looking over a number of your pieces can more easily guide you and make suggestions on how to improve than any of us here who have no idea what your strengths and weaknesses are.

I've been composing for a good number of decades (and I've studied with several composers along the way) and I find that in each and every piece I attempt to not write the same thing over and over. I alone, however, must determine what I will try differently as the piece begins. I consciously decide to allow myself to set up different formal structures or different types of chordal structures that I've never used before. If I find myself too often composing using rhythms that are standard and rarely change time signatures then I deliberately try to explore less standard ones or mix up the time signatures. If I find myself composing melodic material that is short and choppy, then I try to create some that stretch themselves out for a longer time. If I find myself using the sweet spot of each instruments range then I consciously try to find places where their upper and lower parts could be used effectively.

Now, change all the words "I" in the paragraph above to the word "you" and there's my advice. But one more thing: Worry less about being in a "rut". If you just keep writing while consciously attempting anything like the above suggestions, you'll soon discover you're enjoying composing once again.
 
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Vasks has said most of what I would have said.
Also, don't just listen to your favourites: transcribe the stuff by ear, and if possible, study scores. I learnt to read music by getting a few "how to read" books together and transcribing my favourite Zappa tunes (and as a result, I have an odd sense of time and rhythm - because by transcribing I was actively engaged in the music, listening more carefully to all the minute details, I picked up the techniques that appealed to me) before moving on to other stuff too. Most of the stuff I love is not available readily as sheet music, but studying scores is useful if you can get your hands on them. Suppose it depends on how you learn, but personally, I find transcribing more useful than just reading the score and looking for stuff that way.
 
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