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Hurwitz’s top 3 is:
1. Dohnanyi/Cleveland
2. Davis/Concertgebouw
3. Neumann (digital one)
I know not everyone here on this forum likes Hurwitz, but that doesn’t matter right now. Personal opinions aside, what do you think about this list and the order?
 

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Hurwitz’s top 3 is:
1. Dohnanyi/Cleveland
2. Davis/Concertgebouw
3. Neumann (digital one)
I know not everyone here on this forum likes Hurwitz, but that doesn’t matter right now. Personal opinions aside, what do you think about this list and the order?
Not for me...
Monteux, Kertesz, both with LSO.
 

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Hurwitz’s top 3 is:
1. Dohnanyi/Cleveland
2. Davis/Concertgebouw
3. Neumann (digital one)
I know not everyone here on this forum likes Hurwitz, but that doesn’t matter right now. Personal opinions aside, what do you think about this list and the order?

I am not familiar with Davis/Concertgebouw, but the other two are fine recordings. Neumann's analog cycle is also superb. So is Rowicki, Kertesz, Anguelov, Suitner and Pesek. Ivan Fischer with the Budapest Festival Orchestra have also recorded Symphonies Nos. 7 - 9 superbly.

While he does receive regular bashing on this forum, I think Hurwitz's choices are usually fine. The fact that we agree about 80% of the time of course helps!
 

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Another excellent one,imho,would be Antal Dorati with the LSO.Sure are a lot of LSO Dvorak!Decca owns the Rowicki,Davis,Monteux,Dohnanyi,Kertesz,and Dorati Dvorak 7ths.Maybe they could have a box set of the 7th like Universal did with The Rite of Spring.
 

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I'd just like to give my backing to the "there's no out-and-out best recording" argument....!

Most of my favourites have bene mentioned, and those are: Davis, Kertesz, Kubelik, Neumann (earlier cycle).

I have trouble with the Vaclav Talich recording, it's from the late 1930s, and the sound is unsurprisingly poor, so that one is just of historical interest, and likewise a debatable even more dramatic performance, from Karel Sejna (1951). There have been excellent performances of this pieces in the post-shellac era...!

I'd also add that I really do like the more recent Belohlavek recording, as it shows up some interesting details I have never really heard before. Pretty disappointing that someone here can merely dismiss him as an over-rated conductor..... I would echo the praise above for the earlier Giulini recording on EMI too; Oh, and it might be cheap and cheerful, but the Gunzenhauser recording on Naxos is one of the best ones in that set.
 

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just relistened to the problematic slow movement of this as in in general, I do admire Kubelik (esp. in Mahler) and there are some very nice things in his 8th. However here, despite the passion and some wonderful moments, it's in places mannered and erratic and the Berlin sounds simply the wrong orchestra for Dvorak. Neither Pesek nor Neumann are ideal and Belohlavek is simply an over-rated conductor, especially in Dvorak. My first recording of this was actually Monteux and I still think he gets closer to the elusive slow movement atmosphere than most others. Rowicki is worth mentioning -- he does nothing horrendously stupid here and is generally a fine and underrated Dvorak conductor.

It's back to Talich....
I do agree about Kubelik's 7 (but think his 8 is wonderful). But I don't agree about Belohlavek. Monteux? You got that right!
 

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I do agree about Kubelik's 7 (but think his 8 is wonderful). But I don't agree about Belohlavek. Monteux? You got that right!
I'm afraid I've never understood what people see in Belohlavek. Even in Martinu which is something of a speciality, I find him less idiomatic than Neumann for instance.
 

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I am hardly an expert but there are some specific things about the "Czech" sound, e.g. woodwind playing traditions and probably also some rhythmic articulations. However, to me, Dvorak's 7th seems to me one of his least "Czech" pieces, compared e.g. to 8 or 9, not to begin with slavonic dances or rhapsodies.
 

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I am not familiar with Davis/Concertgebouw, but the other two are fine recordings. Neumann's analog cycle is also superb. So is Rowicki, Kertesz, Anguelov, Suitner and Pesek. Ivan Fischer with the Budapest Festival Orchestra have also recorded Symphonies Nos. 7 - 9 superbly.

While he does receive regular bashing on this forum, I think Hurwitz's choices are usually fine. The fact that we agree about 80% of the time of course helps!

I have since listened to Symphony No. 7 by Davis/Concertgebouw (as well as Nos. 8 & 9). A fine recording. I can understand why it is highly recommended.
 
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