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Along with Gould's Mozart, I find these recordings to both be stunningly unique and that's the appeal. I haven't found much other music that does it for me as much as these two.

I also love On the Corner and Big Fun!
 

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I dislike Bitches Brew with a passion. I love Miles Davis, one of my absolute favorite Jazz musicians, but he really loses me from about 1964 to 1980. I love his first quintet/sextet with Bill Evans, Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, and love his collaborations with Gil Evans. I actually like or love most of his 1980s partly electronic material (The Man with the Horn, Tutu, You’re Under Arrest).

His output from1964 to 1980 with his second quintet and the Bitches Brew era is to me frankly unpleasant. Too dissonant and weird for my taste.
 

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Bitches Brew is just immense even allowing for the fact that it and In a Silent Way were products of both Miles and Teo Macero’s imaginations.😎
 
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In a Silent Way and Jack Johnson are my two favorite 'electric Miles' albums primarily because they are the albums where Miles does a lot of his hallmark melodic trumpet improvisations that characterized his career up to that point. On the other electric stuff, the trumpet is more of a sound effects device. Not that its a bad thing, but I always feel a loss that he doesn't really open up and play on many of these albums. Given that, I still like Bitches Brew quite a bit and prefer it to On the Corner because it has more diversity between calmness and intensity where the sameness of On the Corner starts to bore me before the album is over.

What I don't understand is the claim that Bitches Brew is more 'inventive' than In a Silent Way. Silent Way seems to me to be a bigger departure from what came before it than BB is from Silent Way.

If you want to hear some great free-form improvisational music that came out between those two albums, check out the Art Ensemble of Chicago's People in Sorrow (July 1969). Its not electric, but it has a stunning ambience that rivals' what Miles was doing at that point.
 

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The thing about Bitches Brew is that it just came out of nowhere. Back then you had to be able to actually find a record in a shop to buy it, so we had never come across any copies of Silent Way, so this record really blew our hair back. Been in my record collection since I was a teenager

I saw Miles in 1980 on his "Star People" tour. The band had John Scofield and Mike Stern. You could tell from the stage set up that we weren't going to be hearing any standards that night.

the thing I always respected about Miles was that he was always on the fore-front. Think about it....Dizzy Gillespie moves to piano so a young Miles can play with him and Charlie Parker, then Miles practically single handedly ushers in the cool jazz movement in the 50s, then he has the quintet with Wayne and Herbie in the 60s, and then....in the 70s he's doing this.

For me its not so much his playing, but his vision
 

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His output from1964 to 1980 with his second quintet and the Bitches Brew era is to me frankly unpleasant
uh, the second quintet is probably the greatest jazz group of any era, especially the live Plugged Nickel recordings.
Agree about bitches brew and early electronic stuff. Really enjoyed “Amandla” and Tutu.”
 

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The thing about Bitches Brew is that it just came out of nowhere. Back then you had to be able to actually find a record in a shop to buy it, so we had never come across any copies of Silent Way, so this record really blew our hair back. Been in my record collection since I was a teenager
As a teenager in 1970 living only 30 miles from Manhattan, my situation was different. Every Miles album from Kind of Blue to In a Silent Way was readily available in record stores. On top of this my music friends and I were listening to many types of progressive / experimental music including Tony Williams Lifetime, the Don Ellis Orchestra, Frank Zappa, King Crimson, Stockhausen, Hendrix's use of sound effects, and more. So rather than coming out of nowhere, Bitches Brew was just another stunning, highly inventive album that pushed the boundaries in the milieu of the era.
 

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As a teenager in 1970 living only 30 miles from Manhattan, my situation was different. Every Miles album from Kind of Blue to In a Silent Way was readily available in record stores. On top of this my music friends and I were listening to many types of progressive / experimental music including Tony Williams Lifetime, the Don Ellis Orchestra, Frank Zappa, King Crimson, Stockhausen, Hendrix's use of sound effects, and more. So rather than coming out of nowhere, Bitches Brew was just another stunning, highly inventive album that pushed the boundaries in the milieu of the era.
you lucky, lucky *******
 

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Personally I think Miles is one of the greatest musicians that ever lived, but I hold that opinion more for his cool era stuff than his later stuff. Bitches Brew is a good album, but I'm partial to Kind of Blue...Birth of Cool...58 sessions era Miles..
 
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