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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Salut, good evening,
I’m thinking about buying a piano but feeling rather clueless. Will do some googling but it would be nice to interact. Hoping some forum users here may be able to help!
I can play already, but it’s been a long time. I’m not a beginner (I got to Grade 8 level, though didn’t take the exam. Piano was my second instrument with violin my first). I’m not very knowledgeable about the actual instrument though, and have no sense how much one should expect to pay for a piano in 2022. I know some people have electric pianos, this was never something I tried - are they ok, cheaper?
Oh, I should mention I live in rented accommodation so an upright or electric is the choice (and would imagine more affordable than a baby grand. I don’t have a huge budget….). Electric might be an idea on that front as I could practice in silence and not worry about the neighbours, but I don’t know what the quality is like.
I would appreciate advice from those more knowledgeable.
 

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I'd suggest you post on the Piano World forum. It has two sub-forums relevant to your search: one is called "Digital Pianos - Electric Pianos - Synths and Keyboards" and the other is simply called "Piano Forum." The "Digital Pianos" sub-forum should answer any and all questions about electric keyboards, and the "Piano Forum" will do the same for acoustic pianos. The people who contribute to these forums will have lots and lots of information and opinions to guide your search. You can read all posts without registering at the site, but if you want to interact with posters, you will need to become a registered member. It's free to register.

Piano World Forum link
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Aaron,
Thanks so much for taking the time to reply (as an aside, I’m v. curious as to what the background in your profile pic shows). Very kind. I’ll give Piano World a whirl - wish me luck!
 

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A lot of people will give you a nice used piano for free as long you pay for the moving fees. I have a Baldwin that I acquired from a man who was going through a divorce and trying to establish a home for his children that would be suitable for his children to come visit while it was his turn to have custody. He had to get rid of some stuff to make a bedrooms for his son and daughter in his new apartment. He gave it to me for free but I had to pay the moving cost. People have all sorts of reasons for giving a way a piano: lack of space, moving to another state, loss of interest, etc.
 

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A lot of people will give you a nice used piano for free. People have all sorts of reasons for giving away a piano: lack of space, moving to another state, loss of interest, etc.
Exactly why your idea of an electronic keyboard makes a lot of sense. These days you can get weighted keyboards that feel exactly like the real thing, and they can sound like a real piano (or a harpsichord or an organ or a Celeste or you name it). They're portable and cost effective and silent on headphones and if you're renting, they won't complicate your next move.

Yamaha P71 or P45, $500. Check it out.
the P-45 hosts 10 voices - 2 grand pianos, 2 electric pianos, 2 organs, 2 harpsichords, 1 orchestral strings tone and a vibraphone. The sounds are produced using what Yamaha calls "Advanced Wave Memory". This process uses digital multi-samples of acoustic sources and spreads them across the keys. It features metronome, transpose and tuning calibration functions as well as 4 types of reverb. The keyboard can also be split into layers or Duo mode for teaching. A USB to host port allows for use of the keyboard as a MIDI controller.
Yamaha's GHS (Graded Hammer Standard) weighted action has heavier touch in the low end and lighter touch in the high end, just like the hammers inside an acoustic piano. Great for the aspiring pianist, practicing on the GHS action builds the proper finger technique for when the time comes to perform on an acoustic piano.
 

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Best idea is to google for a local piano shop and go in and see them. Most of them do new, second hand and electric and will allow you to try them or demonstrate them for you so that you can listen to the sound. Some will even rent them out with a discount off the final price if you buy. Far better than going through Amazon or whatever.
 

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Another bit of information which may help:
 

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Look for a used piano. Contact your local university and they might be able to steer you in the right direction because they get a bunch of used pianos donated to them. Also, there's usually one guy in town who is an expert at repairing pianos and owns a piano/music store. Ask around. Look online. It's not too difficult to find him, and once you do locate him, visit his music store and ask questions. He should find you exactly what you want. Bring along a piano-playing friend to get a second opinion on the pianos you try out. You can get a good used upright for under $1,500. I haven't looked in a while, so the prices might have gone up a little, but this is one item where new does not mean better.
 

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I would also recommend a used (non-electric) piano. I would look for a seller living not too far away, so you can go there and play a test-session.

I live in a rented city appartment and had no problems with the neighbours so far (as long as I don't play too late). I'm quite happy with my Yamaha piano, which I also bought used. At the test-session with the third piano, I was satisfied and took the offer.

Good luck!
 
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