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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The current situation is creating some thought provoking issues. Some have felt that the "Arts" should be immune to politicizing. There is the other side of the coin.
Can/should classical artists be inspired or even paid to write music that has political themes .
I am attaching a YouTube video from our favorite CL music critic( I hope this works since I am a technical dummie.
To the moderators I posted this in the general discussion for the initial widest dissemination. I understand if it is put into the "poliitical" at the discretion of the moderators.

 

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Difficult to see how this would not turn to discussion involving both music and politics (and only politics as far as relevant for the music can be allowed!).

Moving to the appropriate forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Difficult to see how this would not turn to discussion involving both music and politics (and only politics as far as relevant for the music can be allowed!).

Moving to the appropriate forum.
Thank you,Art Rock.I don't understand the parameter "and only politics as far as relevant for the music can be allowed!). Thank you
 

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I can understand why some think the arts should be free of politics; they may view art as an avenue for people to get along with one another in spite of their differences. Others may think that art's purpose is to advance a cause. Both are valid ways of interpreting what purpose art should serve, and I think that in general, there is no need to abandon one purpose for another. What matters is there is a balance in priorities.

I do not mind artists composing political music, as long as they genuinely believe what they are writing about. (This means I'm skeptical of artists who were paid). Of course, they have to be aware of the consequences of going political, which is potentially alienating a portion of their audience who do not agree with their politics. They should be ready to accept the trade-off.
 

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So what's the dividing line between art and propaganda? Can they be the same? The Battleship Potemkin is most certainly art, but it's also pretty overt pro-Soviet propaganda. So is Prokofiev's Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution, but there's some great music there, imo. Of course someone who is deeply committed to one part of the political spectrum is going to detest the propaganda coming from some opposing place and praise that coming from their own camp.
 
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