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As a working musician your gigs are in bars, with liquor readily available, often for free. Plus during breaks it is not uncommon (understatement) for patrons to offer you other things ... After a while we became used to performing with some kind of buzz and made a joke, "in order to play stoned, you have to practice stoned."

:)
It's actually not a joke, but a fairly well researched phenomenon called state dependent learning. One of my wives learned to play pool in bars while more or less intoxicated (after work in a theater group). Ever after her game markedly improved after a couple of beers - and I was a reliable witness as I don't drink.

I spent a year as an acid head when i was 15-16 years of age. I still remember the impression Beethoven's Eroica, Brahms' Fourth, and a number of other works made on me under the influence of LSD. These were profound listening experiences for me. The best trip I had was the last one, when I heard King Crimson's Larks' Tongues in Aspic for the first time under the influence of two hits of microdot. The understanding of that music I came to that day convinced me to renounce all drugs, find new friends, and change my life completely.
 
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Interesting. When we're very young trips like that really surprise us (from within ourselves, and the realization that it might've been there all the time before). When we get old we try to avoid such intense 'surprises' (I know I do). I just want feel a little differently when I revisit a listening destination. I don't want to lose all my normal references.
The effects of LSD are unpredictable and very individual to different people. In my case, when I was a teen, the principal effect on appreciation seems to have been to strip away all habits of thought and prejudices about music and to concentrate my attention on what I was hearing. I think it made me more open and objective in a way. But then I was never really closed off from classical music so reawakening to it would surely have occurred in any case.
 

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I never performed while taking LSD, but one of my friends, a very prominent, well-known musician, who has held a major orchestra position for years once performed Mahler Sym #4 [major orchestra] while tripping on acid....Wow!! I can't imagine - that is a demanding part....you've got to get and keep your head in the game....

Of course, musicians have been performing under the influence of alcohol for as long as music has existed....
all sorts of drugs have been prevalent too, esp in jazz and rock....

Sadly, some very talented major symphony musicians have essentially "drank themselves out of a job"....
In 1970 Doc Ellis of the Pittsburgh Pirates famously pitched a no-hitter while tripping on LSD. There's nothing surprising about this. The drug doesn't affect coordination or decision making in any direct way. If one loves doing what one is doing and is happy and willing to concentrate on it, LSD might even improve ones performance. But it's unpredictable. If ones mind is not in the right place, one might have no ability to tie ones shoes and might end up in a hospital with a full psychotic break instead. I assume your friend got through it okay than?
 

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I haven't done any serious hallucinogens since I was sixteen years old, but I learned enough from the experience to know that the way the issue is being framed here, that is, focusing on whether one condition is better, clearer, or more natural than the other, is myopic and beside any useful point. No one who has enjoyed hearing music in an altered state is advocating listening in this way habitually. It's not an either or situation. There can be value in the mere fact of hearing music from different perspectives. Listening in an altered state can snap one out of ones normal habits of thought and make one hear a composer or style in a new light. It doesn't necessarily matter whether it's a clearer or more lucid state, only that it's a different one. Even if the state in which one finally appreciates the beauty of Josquin is an hallucinatory stupor, it's possible that the appreciation one comes to will carry over into sober life and that one will have gained something of value — or at least be more open to the possibility.
 
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Well that seems a tad harsh - but then Edward, you are only posting with your customary directness!

It's quite simple. My experience of taking drugs is thin (of being with other people taking drugs more substantial) but enough for me to know that I'm not interested in the pursuit, regardless of what benefits others might claim for it. If my distinction of 'clear/not clear' doesn't suit, let's just stick with 'unaltered by drugs'.

Is that better?
If that was how I felt I would just say I don't want to risk damage to my brain and body by using drugs regardless of any elusive potential benefits — which is pretty much the way I feel about it now. That would make more sense than describing an experience one has not had as listening with an unclear mind or in other terms implying impairment when one isn't in a position to actually know much about it.:)
 

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I need to check on Delta 8 myself. I hear it's like Delta 9 but much mellower and less likely to lead to the more undesirable effects of getting too high. Though I've gotten pretty adjusted to Delta 9 by now, at least with strains I'm familiar with, there's always the possibility of going a bit too far and having a not-fun time.
Delta whah? Did I miss a fun new drug? Seriously, what is it?
 

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I think it's a sad state of affairs that the natural act of trying to better one's self through education that will help establish a career path almost necessitates the incurring of crippling debt at all. I think we would probably agree that entire system needs fixing; but until it's fixed students (or prospective students) need money to survive, and P&P are two legitimate ways of doing that. Maybe not the best choices for everyone, but nothing is.
The current culture in the US is vampiric. Free individuals undertaking natural acts of betterment are only missed opportunities for the blood suckers. Get those fangs in early and keep them in. Debt slaves and rent slaves are its natural products. Personal equity and freedom are its enemies.
 
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Cannabis was on that same list as well. People have always been fearful of anything that messes with your mind as people fear the chaos within themselves. Of course, that fear has nothing to do with the danger of any given drug. We now know pretty definitively that cannabis is less harmful than "legal" drugs like alcohol and nicotine-via-cigarettes, and I know of almost no cases of bad things happening on psychedelics similar to, say, driving drunk.
The Schedule 1 classification of cannabis was purely political, a power move by a racist scumbag named Harry J. Anslinger, the first commissioner of the Bureau of Narcotics in the US. Look him up.
 
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