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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, my friends

Not sure if this is the best place to post this but anyway...:)

When connecting root position triads, in four part writing, can I say that when the first triad is in close position, all the other that follow it are in close position too? The same for open position...

I've tried several exemples and it seem to be confirmed but I asked this to be sure.


Thank you
 

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The first phrase in your question reads as if you are connecting one root position triad to another, then another.

Since the question sounds like one from a beginning level theory student, I assume you meant the root position triad moving to another harmony, not usually another in root position.

If you are talking about those 16 or 32 measure long exercises, and staying within the limits of the chorale as usually presented in first year harmony, whatever you write will probably not travel enough if you follow that set of limits where there are 'no large leaps' in any of the voicings to end up in much of any type of wide open spacing, especially within the shorter 16 measure sort of problem. But, even within those first year lessons limits of moving close to step-wise you could adhere to that and within sixteen bars still smoothly arrive at one or more widely spaced harmonies, which would of course be 'open.'

If I recall, there are some loose guides as to generally how large the intervals are between one part to another to call them either open or closed. You should use that guide on a case-by-case basis to determine whether those chords are one or the other.

I think looking for some general rule of probability is, at this juncture in your study, anyway, looking for an easy shortcut where you can then think less! Sorry, you have to think all the way through.

The reason for that thinking it all the way through now is that by next term you will probably be able to look at a chorale and quickly tick off the open and closed chord voicings in a manner which will feel nearly innate, i.e. the thinking and work done now sinks in to a point where only a bit later you just know, and don't have to think about it. Besides, the second term and subsequent levels have something else new to you which you will again have to initially think all the way through. Best then to have those previous fundamentals down pat :)

Best regards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the reply, Petrb

The first phrase in your question reads as if you are connecting one root position triad to another, then another.
Yes, I'm connecting 4 to 6 triads in root position to form short frases.

If you are talking about those 16 or 32 measure long exercises, and staying within the limits of the chorale as usually presented in first year harmony, whatever you write will probably not travel enough if you follow that set of limits where there are 'no large leaps' in any of the voicings to end up in much of any type of wide open spacing, especially within the shorter 16 measure sort of problem. But, even within those first year lessons limits of moving close to step-wise you could adhere to that and within sixteen bars still smoothly arrive at one or more widely spaced harmonies, which would of course be 'open.'
Yes, more or less that kind of exercises, but shorter (for now). But I see what you mean.

If I recall, there are some loose guides as to generally how large the intervals are between one part to another to call them either open or closed. You should use that guide on a case-by-case basis to determine whether those chords are one or the other.
I'm following Arnold Schoenberg's Theory of Harmony and when doing these exercises I noticed that when the first chord is in close position, all the others that follow it are in close position too (the same for open). The rules for the exercises are simple: keep the common tones and the remaining should move to the nearest with the minimum movement possible.

I think looking for some general rule of probability is, at this juncture in your study, anyway, looking for an easy shortcut where you can then think less! Sorry, you have to think all the way through.
No problem!:) I was just curious about it.

The reason for that thinking it all the way through now is that by next term you will probably be able to look at a chorale and quickly tick off the open and closed chord voicings in a manner which will feel nearly innate, i.e. the thinking and work done now sinks in to a point where only a bit later you just know, and don't have to think about it. Besides, the second term and subsequent levels have something else new to you which you will again have to initially think all the way through. Best then to have those previous fundamentals down pat :)
Yes, I agree. Thank you!:)
 
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