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Rameau - Overture to "La naissance d'Osiris" (Terey-Smith/Naxos)
Janequin - Six Chansons (Ensemble Clement Janequin/Harmonia mundi)
F. Couperin/de Visee - Les Sylvains (Les Delices/private label)
Charpentier - Offerte for Organ, Violins, Flutes and Oboes (Kossenko/Alpha)
Marais - Selections from "Suitte d'un gout etranger" (Coin & Rousset/Decca)
 

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And from the wayback machine:

Listened to 1 disc last night because I was really looking for John Come Kiss Me Now. Found, noted.

Wonderful piece, just a wicked little ear worm that doesn't go away and the adaptation and harmonic structure are pretty fantastic.

I find the timbre of the instrument wearing over the duration of the disc though. Multiple instruments used on different pieces through the 7 discs, so we'll see how this falls out. I am no fan of the harpsichord, and I think this disc was a virginal and still a bit of a grind. There is an influence of the familiar though because I did perk up on other pieces on the disc that I knew.

Amazing venture into the late 16th, early 17 century though. (Is that right? yes, 1539-1623)
 

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NP:

K. A. Hartmann
Symphony No. 6
Bavarian RSO
Kubelik




For me, this is still the set to beat. There's a spirit in the performances that can't be matched. The Metzmacher on EMI always seemed to be interpretatively uninteresting. Like he's getting the orchestra to play the notes, but that's it. There's no thrust or inner life in his performances. They're all faceless. I haven't done enough listening of the newer Challenge Classics set to make a direct comparison with the Wergo, but I should revisit that set.
 

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Bohemian Tales

Augustin Hadelich (violin), Charles Owen (piano), Symphonie-Orchester
des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Jakub Hruša

Dvořák: Humoresque in G flat major, Op. 101 No. 7
Dvořák: Romantic piece, Op. 75, No. 4
Dvořák: Songs My Mother Taught Me, Op. 55 No. 4
Dvořák: Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53
Janáček: Violin Sonata
Suk: Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 17
 

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More Dvořák

Font Circle Slope Design Graphics


First the lovely String Serenade, coupled to the equally lovely Tchaikovsky and Elgar. Superb performances from the Academy of St Martin in the Fields under Neville Marriner.

Then the final four symphonies, courtesy of the LSO under Sir Colin Davis



The 6th is splendid, but I see numbers 7 - 9 have had variable reviews, being unfavourably compared to Davis's earlier performances. I like them well enough though.
 

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And from the wayback machine:

Listened to 1 disc last night because I was really looking for John Come Kiss Me Now. Found, noted.

Wonderful piece, just a wicked little ear worm that doesn't go away and the adaptation and harmonic structure are pretty fantastic.

I find the timbre of the instrument wearing over the duration of the disc though. Multiple instruments used on different pieces through the 7 discs, so we'll see how this falls out. I am no fan of the harpsichord, and I think this disc was a virginal and still a bit of a grind. There is an influence of the familiar though because I did perk up on other pieces on the disc that I knew.

Amazing venture into the late 16th, early 17 century though. (Is that right? yes, 1539-1623)
Is your name "Johnny"by any chance? :rolleyes:
 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m...BD4VNGLOd0KXXTJlS8xOPmEvbFTowwboewsq0KgzRwsFM

Suzy Klein plays the best in classical music, with familiar favourites alongside new discoveries and musical surprises.

0915 Playlist starter - listen and send us your ideas for the next step in our musical journey today.

1010 Song of the Day - harnessing the magic of words, music and the human voice.

1030 Playlist reveal - a sequence of music suggested by you in response to our starter today.

1100 Essential Five - this week we take you on five musical journeys.

1130 Slow Moment - time to take a break for a moment's musical reflection.
 
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This week I've been listening to more choral music from Robert Shaw:

1. Berlioz: Requiem (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/John Aler, tenor); Bioto: Prologue to Mefistofele (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/John Cheek, bass; the Morehouse-Spelman Chorus; the Young Singers of Callenwolde); Verdi: Te Deum (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus) 1985
2. Faure: Requiem (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/Judith Blegen, soprano; James Morris, bass); Durufle: Requiem (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus) 1987
3. Hindemith: Where Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd: A Requiem for Those We Loved (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/William Stone, baritone; Jan DeGaetani, mezzo-soprano) 1987
4. Rachmaninoff: Vespers/All-Night Vigil (Robert Shaw/Robert Shaw Festival Singers) 1990
5. Orff: Carmina Burana (Robert Shaw/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/Judith Blegen, soprano; Haken Hagegard, baritone; William Brown, tenor & the Atlanta Boy Choir) 1981

Telarc Records

Font Rectangle Publication Parallel Pattern
World Font Pattern Plant Electric blue

Flower Plant Petal Purple Font
Brown Wood Font Art Publication

Amber Font Circle Publication Book


These are all great, quality recordings by Robert Shaw and friends. While Colin Davis' more restrained and reverent rendition of Berlioz' Requiem that he made with the London Symphony Orchestra is my favorite, Shaw's is still very good; somewhere in between Davis' restraint and Leonard Bernstein's spectacular recording he made with the French National Orchestra. The added filler by Boito and Verdi is also very fine.

The two Requiems by Faure and Durufle are appropriate companion pieces, both by French composers and evoking an air of ethereal beauty; very sweet and heavenly; and once again, Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus do well to hold there own and then some in a field of innumerable alternate versions by the best conductors, orchestras, and choruses the world over.

Next up, the lesser-known Where Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd: A Requiem for Those We Loved
by Paul Hindemith, then living in the USA and composing it as a tribute to President Franklin D Roosevelt who died in 1945. For a composer who is known as a gnarly and austere German academic, Where Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd could practically pass for a fairlt listenable piece of "Americana" by the likes of William Schuman or Walter Piston. Interestingly, Roger Sessions would publish yet another magnum opus based on the same epic poem by Walt Whitman with his own serial version of Where Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd that was composed in honor of another fallen president, John F Kennedy, who was assassinated in 1963.

This is followed by Shaw's beautiful rendition of Rachmaninoff's Vespers/All-Night Vigil, which is also very fine and beautiful even if it doesn't have the support of those very big and powerful bass voices that we get in other recordings featuring Russian, Baltic, and Eastern European choral groups.

We end with a lively and yet well-measured of Orff's medieval-inspired Carmina Burana; a well-trodden warhorse, where Shaw and friends, again, do very well to hold their own.
 

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Jean Sibelius - songs and other non-orchestral works part two of two scattered throughout the rest of today.

Arioso - song for voice and piano op.3 [Text: Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (1911):
Six Songs for voice and piano op.88 [Texts: Franz Michael Franzen/Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (1917):
Narciss - song for voice and piano WoO [Text: Bertel Gripenberg] (1918):



Hymn to Thaïs - song for voice and piano WoO [Text: Arthur Hjalmar Travers-Borgström] (1909):
Eight Songs for voice and piano op.57 [Texts: Ernst Josephson] (1909):
Six Songs for voice and piano op.72 (first two songs lost) [Texts: Larin-Kyösti a.k.a. Karl Gustaf Larson/Martin Greif/Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (c. 1907 and 1915):
Six Songs for voice and piano op.86 [Texts: Karl August Tavaststjerna/Erik Axel Karlfeldt/Carl Johan Gustav Snoilsky/Mikael Lybeck] (1916-17):
Små flickorna [Little Girls] - song for voice and piano WoO [Text: Hjalmar Procopé] (1920):



Tanken [Thought] - song for unaccompanied mixed choir WoO, arr. for vocal duo and piano WoO [Text: Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (orig. 1888 - arr. 1915):
Six Songs for voice and piano op.90 [Texts: Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (1917):



String Quartet no.4 [Voces intimae] in D-minor op.56 (1909):



Five Songs for unaccompanied male choir op.84 [Texts: Gustav Fröding/Bertel Gripenberg/Jonathan Reuter] (1914-17):
Jääkärimarssi [Jäger March] - song for male choir and piano op.91a, arr. for male choir and brass band by Arvo Kuikka [Text: Heikki Nurmio] (orig. 1917 - arr. ????):
Fridolins dårskap [Fridolin's Madness] - song for unaccompanied male choir WoO [Text: Erik Axel Karlfeldt] (1917):
Jone havsfärd [Jonah's Sea Journey] - song for unaccompanied male choir WoO [Text: Gustaf Fröding] (1918):
Ute hörs stormen [Out There a Storm] - song for unaccompanied male choir WoO [Text: Gösta Schybergson] (1918):
Brusande rusar en våg [Roaring a Wave Rushes] - song for unaccompanied male choir WoO [Text: Gösta Schybergson] (1918):
Likhet [Alikeness] - song for voice and piano, arr. for unaccompanied male choir WoO [Text: Johan Ludvig Runeberg] (orig. 1890 - arr. 1922):
Two Songs for unaccompanied male choir op.108 [Texts: Larin Kyösti] (1925):
Finlandia-hymni - originally Finlandia for orchestra op.26, arr. for unaccompanied male choir op.26bis [Text: Veikko Antero Koskenniemi] (orig. 1899-1900 - arr. 1941):

 
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