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The Strauss has a rather complicated recording history and it wasn't actually discovered until the 1990s. Klemperer was supposed to have conducted, but rather tired and Don Quixote not being a particular favourite of his, he withdrew after the first day. Boult took over the sessions, though it seems their recording was pure accident, and the result of someone flipping the switch as they started working.

The Lalo with Barenboin is a live performance from Cleveland in 1973, when she was in remission from the MS which eventually forced her to give up performing altogether.
 

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Vaughan Williams: A Sea Symphony, I. A Song for All Seas, All Ships (

Jonathan Summers (bass-baritone), Lena Phillips (director), Dame
Felicity Lott (soprano), Cantilena (vocals)
Richard Cooke, London Philharmonic Orchestra, London Philharmonic Choir
Bernard Haitink
Recorded: 1989-03-21
Recording Venue: 19-21 March 1989, No. 1 Studio, Abbey Road, London
 

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Continuing onwards... I'm deriving immense pleasure from these recordings - They just seem to be exactly what I need to hear when I need to hear them the most.

Recorded between 1938 and 1943, there might be a slight sense of compression but it wasn't a factor for me - I've been able to "hear" the performance rather than the "recording", For recordings made over 80 years ago, the remastering is remarkable.

The music itself resonates on a deeply personal basis - Why? - I have no idea... There are times when I'm convinced that my appreciation for (or lack of) music is essentially neurological - Hard-wired neural pathways - this chaotic series of connected neurons that randomly send signals from one part of the brain to another. Some of the neurons reach their intended destination - some only make it halfway - and the rest just kind of wander around aimlessly wondering exactly why they walked into this room and where they might have left their car keys and where did they lose their sunglasses and why are they wearing only one shoe.... and even that one is on the wrong foot... But maybe that's just me...

Sir John Barbirolli - The Complete RCA and Columbia Album Collection

Ottorino Resphighi: Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No. 3

Ottorino Resphighi: Fontane di Roma

Schubert: Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D417 'Tragic'

Schubert: 5 Minuets with 6 Trios, D89
 

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I think the recording is somehow lack of balance of three instruments.
The cello sounds as loud as the piano. I feel no separation but three sounds mix together.
I did check others' review and confirmed my observation. Nevertheless, I still finished listening Piano trio No.1.
 

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Chaconne
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The best Kissin recording I know. He was truly awesome then. Now so boring 🤨
I once watched Kissin's live performance of Beethoven late piano sonatas and echo with Bach Italian Concerto. That is one of my unforgettable concerts.
 

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Steven Stucky: American Muse, Rhapsodies, Concerto for Orchestra (Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Gil Rose, Sanford Sylvan, BMPO)

Steven Edward Stucky (1949 - 2016) was an American composer. Rhapsodies for Orchestra (2008) is a single-movement orchestral work that is a good opener for the CD. American Muse (1999), for baritone and orchestra, reminds me of various American composers (most notably Bernstein and Barber), which is probably the intention given the title of the work. The Concerto for Orchestra is actually his first one, composed in 1987 - not the Pulitzer Prize-(2005) winning second one. The first one was actually a finalist for the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for Music, and for me the best piece on the CD. Interesting composer.
 
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