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They just want to destroy the consensus of humanity.
Eh? Who wants to do what? I don't understand.
I’d bet my life that the majority of humanity has no idea who Mozart is and has only heard his music if it was used in a TV ad.

Thus it seems to me, the consensus of humanity is a shrug.

I have never seen a group of people so hyperventilate over a 15 hour optional course. Wait - yes I have - all over the internet.
 

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I’d bet my life that the majority of humanity has no idea who Mozart is and has only heard his music if it was used in a TV ad.

Thus it seems to me, the consensus of humanity is a shrug.

I have never seen a group of people so hyperventilate over a 15 hour optional course. Wait - yes I have - all over the internet.
I find it unsettling that so many are willing to make a judgement on so little information: a post about an article which hardly anyone has read about a university course which, I'm pretty sure no one here has attended, about a subject that few understand.

It's a good job the Internet doesn't matter. :confused:
 

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According to reports:

Cambridge music students are being instructed to “decolonise the ear” and consider the classical canon as “an imperial phenomenon”.
The works of composers such as Mozart and Verdi are being taught in relation to topics including European Imperialism and Orientalism, as the music faculty pursues work on “curricular decolonisation”.
Undergraduates studying for the course, titled Decolonising the Ear, are taught to consider listening to sound in a “postcolonial” way, while a “music, power, empire” module explores how the classical repertoire is a middle-class and imperial phenomenon.
The music faculty has agreed to offer content warnings ahead of teaching “potential disturbing” musical topics, according to internal documents, after they were requested by students.

Do you think record labels should provide content warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content in Mozart’s music?
According to reports:

Cambridge music students are being instructed to “decolonise the ear” and consider the classical canon as “an imperial phenomenon”.
The works of composers such as Mozart and Verdi are being taught in relation to topics including European Imperialism and Orientalism, as the music faculty pursues work on “curricular decolonisation”.
Undergraduates studying for the course, titled Decolonising the Ear, are taught to consider listening to sound in a “postcolonial” way, while a “music, power, empire” module explores how the classical repertoire is a middle-class and imperial phenomenon.
The music faculty has agreed to offer content warnings ahead of teaching “potential disturbing” musical topics, according to internal documents, after they were requested by students.

Do you think record labels should provide content warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content in Mozart’s music?
There have been "learned" notions throughout history that have, when viewed in the rear view mirror of time, cause us all to simply shake our heads and collectively agree that those notions were unalloyed stupidity. The reason the Western Hemisphere was not discovered by the nations of the other one, was in no small part owing to the widely-held belied that the world is flat. Stupid. Galileo was sentenced to house arrest for the last 31 years of his life for publishing the "theory" that the Earth revleoves around the Sun, rather than the other way around
According to reports:

Cambridge music students are being instructed to “decolonise the ear” and consider the classical canon as “an imperial phenomenon”.
The works of composers such as Mozart and Verdi are being taught in relation to topics including European Imperialism and Orientalism, as the music faculty pursues work on “curricular decolonisation”.
Undergraduates studying for the course, titled Decolonising the Ear, are taught to consider listening to sound in a “postcolonial” way, while a “music, power, empire” module explores how the classical repertoire is a middle-class and imperial phenomenon.
The music faculty has agreed to offer content warnings ahead of teaching “potential disturbing” musical topics, according to internal documents, after they were requested by students.

Do you think record labels should provide content warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content in Mozart’s music?
According to reports:

Cambridge music students are being instructed to “decolonise the ear” and consider the classical canon as “an imperial phenomenon”.
The works of composers such as Mozart and Verdi are being taught in relation to topics including European Imperialism and Orientalism, as the music faculty pursues work on “curricular decolonisation”.

Undergraduates studying for the course, titled Decolonising the Ear, are taught to consider listening to sound in a “postcolonial” way, while a “music, power, empire” module explores how the classical repertoire is a middle-class and imperial phenomenon.

The music faculty has agreed to offer content warnings ahead of teaching “potential disturbing” musical topics, according to internal documents, after they were requested by students.
There have been "learned" notions throughout history that have, when viewed in the rear view mirror of time, cause us all to simply shake our heads and collectively agree that those notions were unalloyed stupidity.

The reason the Western Hemisphere was not discovered by the nations of the other one, was in no small part owing to the widely-held belief that the world was flat. Stupid.

Galileo was sentenced to house arrest for the last 31 years of his life for publishing the "theory" that the Earth revolves around the Sun, rather than the other way around. Stupid.

George Washington might have lived another ten years if his doctors hadn’t decided to bleed him to death to cure what ailed him. Stupid.

Dictionaries as recent as the early 20th Century defined the atom as the smallest particle of matter, which could not be further subdivided. Stupid.

And now we get our turn, as the overseers at one of the finest universities in the world are undertaking to “teach” our youth that Mozart’s music represents “middle class imperialism”. Stupid. On steroids.

If there is one thing in all of human output that is certifiably free of “middle class imperialism”, it is the music of Mozart. The day will finally arrive, and none too soon, when the world will look at such vainglorious pseudo intellectual claptrap, and say “stupid”.

Well, I’m not in the mood, nor of an age, that I can wait around for fifty years for the world to “decolonize” the neo-Maoist hallucinations of the faculty at Cambridge, I have already reached my conclusion,

It’s stupid.
 

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According to reports:

Cambridge music students are being instructed to “decolonise the ear” and consider the classical canon as “an imperial phenomenon”.
The works of composers such as Mozart and Verdi are being taught in relation to topics including European Imperialism and Orientalism, as the music faculty pursues work on “curricular decolonisation”.
Undergraduates studying for the course, titled Decolonising the Ear, are taught to consider listening to sound in a “postcolonial” way, while a “music, power, empire” module explores how the classical repertoire is a middle-class and imperial phenomenon.
The music faculty has agreed to offer content warnings ahead of teaching “potential disturbing” musical topics, according to internal documents, after they were requested by students.

Do you think record labels should provide content warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content in Mozart’s music?
It seems a lot of people offering their opinions are not doing much critical thinking and falling into the knee-jerk reaction that certain media pushers want. It is one course, not the whole degree, that addresses the political and social context of music. That is a perfectly acceptable aspect of critical thinking on the relationship of music and art in its cultural context. It is NOT a sign of indoctrination!
Your quote on "warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content" I think you have got back to front. It is not warning that Mozart's music is disturbing, but the study of Mozart's music in a wider cultural context could be disturbing. Indeed, the use of cymbals, a symbol of the Turks, in Die Enfuhrung aus dem Serail, points towards the attitudes and relationship between Europe and the Ottoman Empire.
 

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No. I think students should go to college to be educated, not to become more stupid than they already are. They should be forced to listen to Mozart, without recourse to comment, until they get it. Then they can be set loose on the world. But filling their heads full of nonsense while they’re actuality sitting beside a boxset of Wolfie? It makes wonder who educated the educators…
I couldn't put it better myself.
 

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It seems a lot of people offering their opinions are not doing much critical thinking and falling into the knee-jerk reaction that certain media pushers want. It is one course, not the whole degree, that addresses the political and social context of music. That is a perfectly acceptable aspect of critical thinking on the relationship of music and art in its cultural context. It is NOT a sign of indoctrination!
Your quote on "warnings of ‘potentially disturbing’ musical content" I think you have got back to front. It is not warning that Mozart's music is disturbing, but the study of Mozart's music in a wider cultural context could be disturbing. Indeed, the use of cymbals, a symbol of the Turks, in Die Enfuhrung aus dem Serail, points towards the attitudes and relationship between Europe and the Ottoman Empire.
"Points toward"? Vienna had been besieged by the Turks a century earlier. And again a century and a half before that.
 

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"Points toward"? Vienna had been besieged by the Turks a century earlier. And again a century and a half before that.
Can you please desist from posting like this? Historical facts do not help the current fashionable paradigms - in fact most facts merely get in the way of the socially constructed narrative.
 

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I find it unsettling that so many are willing to make a judgement on so little information: a post about an article which hardly anyone has read about a university course which, I'm pretty sure no one here has attended
Exactly.

In order to know that a piece of dog-shìt tastes nasty, you would need to lick it - how else would you know?
 

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Specific tropes about virtuous white girls getting kidnapped by non-white antagonists (frequently "noble" or honorable ones, frequently as a framing device to put them in an exotic location) show up a lot beyond Mozart. I think there are probably ways to look at this that don't involve it being some kind of atrocity exhibition of "look how bad this is" (which is what you tend to see in more sensationalized media versions of "analysis).
gik
Well I certainly wouldn't be surprised to see my comment "disappeareded". :ROFLMAO:
Is this the liberal "victim culture" I've heard so much about?
 

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Is this the liberal "victim culture" I've heard so much about?
No, it's probably the 'cancellation culture' of non-liberals that you've heard even more about.
 

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No, it's probably the 'cancellation culture' of non-liberals that you've heard even more about.

The same thing, I think.

This is going beyond the mandate of the thread, but it's a consistent bugbear of mine. For all the hand-wringing about online articles calling things racist, the ones using the levers of state power to ban art are not the "woke" ones.

PEN America, a free-speech/first amendment advocacy NPO for writers, on a rapidly expanding trend of banning books from school libraries:

Of all bans listed in the Index, 41% (644 individual bans) are tied to directives from state officials or elected lawmakers to investigate or remove books in schools.
In most of these cases, the rules are not for "woke" banning of "racist" books - it is the removal of books about gay people under newly-mandated obscenity laws.

Across numerous states, political pressure has played a direct role in book bans in at least eight districts, resulting in diminished student access to 644 titles. Of all bans and restrictions listed in the Index, 41% have a direct tie to political pressure exerted in these eight districts in Texas, South Carolina, and Georgia. Such politically motivated book bans directly implicate the First Amendment concerns articulated by the Supreme Court in Pico to prevent politicians from exercising their own predilections in book removals or others from imposing ideological orthodoxy in schools.
So - who's banning art, again?
 

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fbjim said:
So - who's banning art, again?
Well I don't have first-hand knowledge of the situation, but my understanding is that some parents are upset about sexually graphic material being assigned to their children to read. It's not "banning art". Now we can look at the jurisdictions that have banned Huckleberry Finn and To Kill a Mockingbird as well.
 

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Specific tropes about virtuous white girls getting kidnapped by non-white antagonists (frequently "noble" or honorable ones, frequently as a framing device to put them in an exotic location) show up a lot beyond Mozart. I think there are probably ways to look at this that don't involve it being some kind of atrocity exhibition of "look how bad this is" (which is what you tend to see in more sensationalized media versions of "analysis).
...
Which may not have been any more an emphasis that Mozart wanted to make than the aristocracy vs the peasantry trope in Figaro. He transcended it and put it at the human level, beyond political pamphleteering and preaching. That's the story for me. Similarly with Othello.
 

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Well I don't have first-hand knowledge of the situation, but my understanding is that some parents are upset about sexually graphic material being assigned to their children to read. It's not "banning art". Now we can look at the jurisdictions that have banned Huckleberry Finn and To Kill a Mockingbird as well.
This was, perhaps, the case in the past, where around 2000 or so, the most common reasons a book would be banned would be either a) depictions of sex, or b) the use of a racial slur, AKA "the book is Huck Finn, To Kill a Mockingbird, or Of Mice And Men".

One might expect this to accelerate in the "woke era", and that we'd see whole swaths of books being removed for using racial slurs - but in fact, the vast majority of censorship in school libraries these days are because the books have gay or queer people in them.

To that point that it's not "banning art" - the constant fear I see is that teachers are not teaching classical music, classical art, canonical literature etc because they are racist. But now it's fine to quibble that actually removing books from libraries doesn't constitute "banning art"?
 

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No, my understanding is it's being played out at school board meetings as we speak.
Please read my entire post. The days of the book banning list being endless repeats of Huck Finn and Harry Potter are over.

This is the listed rationale of the 10 most banned books in US school libraries in 2021. This is, in fact, a direct result of what has been called the nationalization of local politics, where previously local, non-partisan things like school board meetings can quickly turn into national issues due to social media, the traditional media deliberately focusing on them, and advocacy groups.

This, and the deliberate fermentation of an anti-gay moral panic by media groups and fringe advocacy groups in the last year or so. This is, in fact, a new trend, and not a good one.

It is also worth noting that unlike someone yelling about N-words in Huck Finn, this has been done via both social pressure and state power in multiple states.

  1. Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, and because it was considered to have sexually explicit images
  2. Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  3. Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content, profanity, and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  4. Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for depictions of abuse and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  5. Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, violence, and because it was thought to promote an anti-police message and indoctrination of a social agenda
  6. Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references and use of a derogatory term
  7. Reasons: Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and degrading to women
  8. Reasons: Banned and challenged because it depicts child sexual abuse and was considered sexually explicit
  9. Reasons: Banned, challenged, relocated, and restricted for providing sexual education and LGBTQIA+ content.
  10. Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.
 

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fbjim said:
the vast majority of censorship in school libraries these days are because the books have gay or queer people in them.
It depends on the age group. I don't see the rationale behind assigning such to elementary school kids, gay, queer, hetero, whatever. Shouldn't the parents have a say?

But anyway this is going beyond the limits of the subject and I'm sure there's going to be moderator action incoming...
 

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Do you really think Mozart gets a "free pass"? I have heard Erich Leinsdorf in an interview around the Mozart anniversary 1991 when he said that one had to change the text of Monostatos (weil ein Schwarzer hässlich ist/because a black man is ugly) because nowadays one could not sing such a line. Probably nobody changed that text in Europe 30 years ago but Leinsdorf having worked in the US for so long was more sensitive. It's not a subtle denigration ;)

Nevertheless, I don't think such texts should be changed...
I don't think it should be changed either, but for a different reason. I don't think it should be changed because I think it's good people confront the evils of past societies and not try to wash them out of the texts so audiences won't have to feel uncomfortable with them. If they make audiences uncomfortable, then, good, they're still serving a purpose; if they don't, THEN there's a problem. I recall Roger Ebert's great review of the original, even more blatantly racist, Birth of a Nation. To quote the best parts:
He achieved what no other known man has achieved. To watch his work is like being witness to the beginning of melody, or the first conscious use of the lever or the wheel; the emergence, coordination and first eloquence of language; the birth of an art: and to realize that this is all the work of one man.

These words by James Agee about D. W. Griffith are almost by definition the highest praise any film director has ever received from a great film critic. On the other hand, the equally distinguished critic Andrew Sarris wrote about Griffith's masterpiece: "Classic or not, 'Birth of a Nation' has long been one of the embarrassments of film scholarship. It can't be ignored...and yet it was regarded as outrageously racist even at a time when racism was hardly a household word."

...

Griffith and "The Birth of a Nation" were no more enlightened than the America which produced them. The film represents how racist a white American could be in 1915 without realizing he was racist at all. That is worth knowing. Blacks already knew that, had known it for a long time, witnessed it painfully again every day, but "The Birth of a Nation" demonstrated it in clear view, and the importance of the film includes the clarity of its demonstration. That it is a mirror of its time is, sadly, one of its values.

To understand "The Birth of a Nation" we must first understand the difference between what we bring to the film, and what the film brings to us. All serious moviegoers must sooner or later arrive at a point where they see a film for what it is, and not simply for what they feel about it. "The Birth of a Nation" is not a bad film because it argues for evil. Like Riefenstahl’s “The Triumph of the Will,” it is a great film that argues for evil. To understand how it does so is to learn a great deal about film, and even something about evil.
As it is one can at least argue that Monostatos might be so nasty because he is mistreated.
One can argue that about a play like The Merchant of Venice where it's even explicit in the text. At the hand of a master like Shakespeare, who understood the multiplicity of human perspectives and how society creates its own monsters through the perspectives that choose to demonize or treat certain people as outsiders to be mistrusted and mistreated; the problem is that there's very little of the humanizing, sympathetic, complexity of touch of Shakespeare in a libretto like Flute. There's, perhaps, one brief mention by Monostatos about this, but it's meagre hollowness is amplified all the more when compared to a character like Shylock.

EDIT: How is the word "Shylock" censored? I guess because it can be used as an anti-semitic insult? I've only ever heard the term in connection with Shakespeare's character. Makes it difficult as I can't even link to the Wiki page about the character because this site will literally censor the name in the link.
 
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