Classical Music Forum banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. This is my first post.

I was wondering if anybody could help me out. I'm looking for some deeply disturbing music. I want very deep and moving. The best I can seem to do is Shostakovichs string quartet no 8 in c minor, and its not enough!! I NEED to be moved, deeply.

Can anybody recommend that ultimate piece?

Thank you all in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
It depends on your taste. I find much of Bach's music deeply moving, but I don't think many people would consider Baroque music disturbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
Listen to Honegger's Symphony #2, performed by Charles Munch and the Orchestra of Paris on the EMI label. It has very powerful, dark music that you don't want to miss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Like phatic says, it all depends on what kind of music you're looking for. There is "dark disturbing" music in every period (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc). But I'm a specialist listener in the Romantic period piano niche, so I think I have to vouch for Charles Valentin Alkan as a composer of dark, depressing, agonizing music from the abyss. However, you may be looking for atonal stuff and so Alkan wouldn't qualify.

In any case, I must recommend the L'enfer or "Hell" movement from Alkan's Grand Duo concertant in F sharp minor Op. 21 for piano, violin and cello. I don't know what Alkan was thinking when he wrote it, whether the pure evil piano chords mean to depict Hell as a physical place, like a dark void, or whether the mourning violin is referring to Hell as a state of mind, like hopelessness and regret. It might not be your cup of tea if you're into Shostakovich string quartets, but in my opinion, the L'enfer is a masterpiece; it's one of the best musical manifestations of Hell I've ever heard. Unlike Liszt's Dante Sonata/Symphony, Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable, or Mussorgsky's Night on Bare Mountain, it doesn't wail and crash with infernal sounds or scherzo-ish demonic noises... it instead focuses on the sickingly disturbing "pain" of being in Hell. I really think it's a grand composition: bleak, slow, dissonant (not atonal) and a real musical excavation into the spiritual suffering one could experience in Hell.

Overall, it's a "disturbing" and yet lyrical work that I could recommend to anyone for a taste in Romantic period chamber music. But hey, this is just my opinion :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you Hexameron for your reply.

I'll clarify a little more what I'm looking for. Music similar to.......


Krzysztof Penderecki - Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima
Stravinsky - Rite of spring
Shostakovich - String quartet no 8 in c minor

Modern stuff really. Heavy, dramatic, disturbing almost unorthadox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Prehaps Schnittke's concerto grosso no.1 or Schoenberg's 'Verklarte Nacht'

Schnittke is disturbing and modern, but his music is still deeply connected to traditional methods. Schoenberg's 'Verklarte Nacht' is extremely emotional and disturbing in the style of Late-Romantic music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Like phatic says, it all depends on what kind of music you're looking for. There is "dark disturbing" music in every period (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc). But I'm a specialist listener in the Romantic period piano niche, so I think I have to vouch for Charles Valentin Alkan as a composer of dark, depressing, agonizing music from the abyss. However, you may be looking for atonal stuff and so Alkan wouldn't qualify.

In any case, I must recommend the L'enfer or "Hell" movement from Alkan's Grand Duo concertant in F sharp minor Op. 21 for piano, violin and cello. I don't know what Alkan was thinking when he wrote it, whether the pure evil piano chords mean to depict Hell as a physical place, like a dark void, or whether the mourning violin is referring to Hell as a state of mind, like hopelessness and regret. It might not be your cup of tea if you're into Shostakovich string quartets, but in my opinion, the L'enfer is a masterpiece; it's one of the best musical manifestations of Hell I've ever heard. Unlike Liszt's Dante Sonata/Symphony, Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable, or Mussorgsky's Night on Bare Mountain, it doesn't wail and crash with infernal sounds or scherzo-ish demonic noises... it instead focuses on the sickingly disturbing "pain" of being in Hell. I really think it's a grand composition: bleak, slow, dissonant (not atonal) and a real musical excavation into the spiritual suffering one could experience in Hell.

Overall, it's a "disturbing" and yet lyrical work that I could recommend to anyone for a taste in Romantic period chamber music. But hey, this is just my opinion :)
This sounds interesting. Know where I can find this song?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Glad you're intrigued enough to buy that. Alkan is somewhat of a craze in the piano world right now. Chopin, Liszt, Bulow and Busoni always recognized his abilities. Before Chopin died, he gave most of his unpublished drafts to Alkan; Liszt remarked that Alkan had the best technique he had ever seen; Bulow called him the "Berlioz of the piano"; Busoni ranked Alkan as the best piano composer after Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, and Brahms. Just recently (around 1977 I think) Ronald Smith and Raymond Lewenthal revived his works. Now, pianists like Marc-Andre Hamelin and Laurent Martin have created an even larger stir by recording a good bulk of this enigmatic composer's works.

Regarding that CD, you shouldn't be disappointed if you like late-classical or Romantic chamber music. The quality of these piano trios/duos is startling. Sometimes masterpieces can be forgotten as Bach has shown us, and Alkan is no exception.

Hope you like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
Now, if you want to get REAL disturbing, listen to Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima by Krystof Penderecki. The moment you begin listening to it, your ears will experience a wave of sheer, agonizing pain. The first minute of the piece I have dubbed "The Scream." Some of the most beautiful music you will ever hear, nonetheless. Highly disturbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
:eek: Somebody actually likes that piece by Penderecki?? Good grief, I am almost lost for words. That is the most awful racket I have ever heard.
Wow. I am startled. Personally, I think it is an amazing use of strings. I agree, traditionally it is far from orthodox and musical rules. But, the sheer atmosphere of the piece has provoked more emotion from me than anything musical ever. I listen to it a lot and the pure harrowment of the piece is incredibly well demonstrated through the use of the instruments.

Yes, if you like melody and beauty then this piece would seem like a racket. But, in my opinion, I think it is the work of a genius. Music doesn't get much darker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
This might be exactly what you are looking for:

Alfred Schnittke - Monologue (a viola concerto)
Béla Bartók - The Miraculus Mandarin ('Le Mandarin merveillaux')



Other recommendations:
Bartók - String Quartets no. 3 & 4
Ligeti - Atmospheres
Leifs - Organ concerto
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
And how about Coriolan Overture by Beethoven? Not that horrifying but surely very grave, leaden and dark.
Liszt's Totentanz? Or it's more diabolically humourous than scary... How about Csárdás macabre?
And I'd say Mozart too can be rather gloomy and thunderous, even though quite seldom. For example Symphony no.40 (well, a far shot...), Requiem, Don Giovanni Oveture...
Oh, and yes, Batók can be really, really scary!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
A safe path to take is to buy the compositions that have met with wide popularity. Orff’s O Fortuna from Carmina Burana is the darkest and most evil score that is widely popular. For something that is deep, sweet, sad and sublime I recommend Gorecki’s Symphony #3, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs. It was by far the best selling classical recording in 1992.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
A safe path to take is to buy the compositions that have met with wide popularity. Orff's O Fortuna from Carmina Burana is the darkest and most evil score that is widely popular. For something that is deep, sweet, sad and sublime I recommend Gorecki's Symphony #3, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs. It was by far the best selling classical recording in 1992.
I was also going to mention Gorecki actually. Not necessarily the Symphony 3, but his works in general (that I own) often have a deep, sombre feeling to them. I think this is drawn from his deep/intense religious beliefs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
lol its not really music that is recorded, but any chorales are moving to me, especially Praetorius' minor chorales. But as in my post about ur favorite piece, i would recomend Mozart's Requiem in C minor. Deep and moving, with powerful lyrics and equally moving chords.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top