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Do your musical tastes change over time?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I used to hate this sort of music: over-blown, melodramatic, those soppy grins many sopranos wear when singing a 'happy' bit, then reverting to a face like a smacked a*se when the music's 'serious' again.

But now I can't get enough of it, and the above raises hairs on the back of the neck. A powerful, highly trained soprano, with a lung capacity like a troop of bagpipes (watch Anne Sofie von Otter pump herself up at 1:47 - gosh) is a thing of beauty and wonder.

Do you find your music tastes change over time and, if so, can you trace it to a cause? In my case it was being exposed recently to Dudamel conducting some highly Romantic 19th century stuff. It was an eye-opener and blew away my prejudices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I used to fight shy of Ligeti, thinking of him as too much like hard work. But then discovered I'd liked him for years without realising it! Large chunks of his Requiem appear in one of my favourite films: '2001: A Space Odyssey' (associated with the black monoliths). :rolleyes:

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Abstain.

My Classical Music taste is static inasmuch as... once I like a classical piece, I will continue to like it. There are virtually no exceptions to this (Verdi comes close, though).

This is as opposed to rock/pop music, where I DO have those moments where I say "what did I ever see in ___________?"

My Classical Music taste in dynamic in the sense of "expanding." Works that I'd rejected previously, or had been unwilling to give a complete hearing are finding their way well into my sphere of appreciation.
That makes sense. I should have included an abstain option. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Point being... I think this thread would be a good launching point for the interesting question: "to what extent do your musical tastes change over time?" We've achieved that rara avis of message board participation, unanimity on the header question... so then the topic can be distilled further, to the question of how and how much our changes in musical taste have occurred.
I agree. The other interesting question is 'why?' What causes the change to occur? A related question is how much people move from pop music to classical music as they get older. To what extent is musical taste is a function of age?

More specifically, much pop music is used as backcloth to mating: young people listen to it, embed themselves in the culture, while sexually active. Once they've settled down in a semi with a cat, their musical tastes may change. That's not to imply that classical music isn't also used for mating purposes - as this thread on the BBC Radio 3 website made clear recently - but the sexual function seems less primary.
 
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