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Impossible to have one favorite. I have at least a thousand jazz records if not more.
 
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I discovered jazz in college (& classical music shortly thereafter). In those days, my favorite jazz artists were Keith Jarrett, his solo albums such as the Köln, Bremen, & Lausanne concerts, & with his trio ("Treasure Island", "My Song", etc.), Benny Goodman, Sonny Rollins, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, The Modern Jazz Quartet, Ella Fitzgerald, McCoy Tyner, Pat Metheny, John Abercrombie, & Herbie Hancock. I also listened to Joni Mitchell's jazz influenced albums, which came out about that time.

While I saw Miles Davis in concert in the 1970s, during his late phase (& listened to John Coltrane LPs), surprisingly, I didn't discover Davis's early classic jazz albums, like "Kind of Blue" & "Sketches of Spain" until many years later (as my then growing, consuming passion for classical music took over & got in the way of my other listening).

Below are the jazz & jazz fusion albums that I've most listened to over the past decade, so I'd have to say that I consider the following jazz musicians to be my current favorites. While it's difficult to rank them, I have tried to list them in order of how frequently I listen to each, which probably says something:

--Astrid & João Gilberto, with saxophonist Stan Getz, & Antonio Carlos Jobim on piano. I listen to both their classic Bossa nova-jazz album from 1963--"Gilberto/Getz", & the "20th Century Masters Millennium Collection" CD.



--"Kind of Blue", Miles Davis, with an all star line up of other jazz greats: John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly & Bill Evans on piano. I doubt there's a jazz lover out there that doesn't have this album on their short list of favorites.


--Bill Evans, with his trio, such as "Portrait in Jazz", from 1960:
, & his solo sessions, too:
.

--"The Art of Tea", Michael Franks, backed up by some fantastic jazz musicians! This is a very underrated jazz-R&B-rock fusion album from 1976. I hear it more as 70s jazz, but the music is eclectic, mellow, & unique:

Nightmoves

--Keith Jarrett, "The Bremen Concert", from 1975: Keith Jarrett Solo 1975 "The Bremen Concert" Complete & unedited.

--Chet Baker, "Lets get Lost" (his greatest hits): Chet Baker Greatest Hits Full Album -Chet Baker Legend Songs

--Herbie Hancock, "Maiden Voyage": Herbie Hancock Maiden Voyage (Full Album)

--Benny Goodman & Paris:

I Love Paris
April in Paris
Autumn Leaves

--The Dave Brubeck Quartet, their classic "Take Five" from the album, "Time Out": Dave Brubeck - Take Five
 

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. . . .

--"Kind of Blue", Miles Davis, with an all star line up of other jazz greats: John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly & Bill Evans on piano. I doubt there's a jazz lover out there that doesn't have this album on their short list of favorites.



[/QUOTE]

I've never seen KOB with those additional tracks (although, I'm pretty sure I have them all on other albums). Where did it come from?
 

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Bill Evans for me, because in his interviews he tells us what we need to do to play like him. 'Very insightful.
 
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Dave Brubeck, mostly with his original quartet including Paul Desmond, but I like practically all of his output.

Other groups that I like are the Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ), and some of Miles Davis' work, mostly his 55-59 quintet and sextet including Kind of Blue as well as his collaborations with Gil Evans. I don't like his 60s quintet and his "Bitches Brew" period, but again like some of his later 1980s work.
 

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jegreenwood writes, "I've never seen KOB [Kind of Blue] with those additional tracks (although, I'm pretty sure I have them all on other albums). Where did it come from?"

The extra tracks come from the group's earlier May 26, 1958 sessions, which were included on disc two of the 2008 "50th anniversary collector's edition" reissue (& elsewhere); with disc one being the classic 1959 KOB album. Here are the complete contents of the 50th anniversary reissue explained,

 

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Hard to pick an absolute favorite, so I'll go with my latest favorite - Shabaka Hutchings. Been totally digging his Sons of Kemet and The Comet Is Coming projects. By association, this leads to Makaya McCraven, Joel Ross, Theon Cross, and so many more from this great new London jazz scene.
 

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Probably Charles Mingus for me because I like his music from virtually throughout the whole of his career. I have more albums by Miles Davis than I have of anyone else but I can't say I was bowled over by what he did after his mid-late 70s hiatus. I haven't heard enough of Ornette Coleman's post-Atlantic output to rate him properly, but his Atlantic period is without doubt one of my favourite collections of work.
 
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An impossible question to answer for most Jazz fans. There are simply too many great artists out there. The few that come to mind at the moment are Miles, Mingus, Braxton, Coleman, Ulmer, Holdsworth .... it's an endless list.
 

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might be obvious and predictable but two musicians who have made a significant and appreciable difference to my life for approx 40 years.......

Pat Metheny and Keith Jarrett

others that have contributed include John Taylor, Marcin Wasilewski and ( clearly ) Miles Davis......

but both Jarrett and Metheny......'something else man!'
 

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jegreenwood writes, "I've never seen KOB [Kind of Blue] with those additional tracks (although, I'm pretty sure I have them all on other albums). Where did it come from?"

The extra tracks come from the group's earlier May 26, 1958 sessions, which were included on disc two of the 2008 "50th anniversary collector's edition" reissue (& elsewhere); with disc one being the classic 1959 KOB album. Here are the complete contents of the 50th anniversary reissue explained,

From the milesdavis.com page you referenced:

In every way, Kind of Blue (recorded and released on Columbia in 1959), starring Miles’ “first great quintet” – Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley (1928-1975, alto saxophone), John Coltrane (1926-1967, tenor saxophone), Bill Evans (1929-1980, piano) or Wynton Kelly (1931-1971, piano), Paul Chambers (1935-1969, bass), and Jimmy Cobb (b. 1929, drums, the only surviving member)

Bit of a counting problem here - ;)
 
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