Classical Music Forum banner
61 - 80 of 92 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
The first set I heard and became familiar with was the Kondrashin. It is expensive but absolutely worth it. I doubt we will ever hear another complete set like this. I prefer mono and early stereo so the sound is perfect for me. I like a dry mix. And its importance as a historical document can't really be contested. Short of early Mravinsky, this is it. While I enjoy Barshai's set very much, the Kondrashin is in a league of its own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,527 Posts
Barshai is fine for me since the Kondrashin set is out of print. Petrenko's 10th is a good one. There is another older Russian conductor I like but his name escapes me. I don't think he recorded the whole cycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #66 ·
I have quite a few cycles and like (among others) the Caetani cycle. I hadn't heard of Oleg Caetani, so I looked him up in Wiki and got a surprise: "Caetani was born the son of the conductor and composer Igor Markevitch and his second wife Donna Topazia Caetani (1921—90), who is descended from a very old aristocratic Roman family that included the early 14th-century Pope Boniface VIII. Caetani has chosen to use his mother's family name to continue its lineage."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,406 Posts
Good guess! I like him too but I'm thinking of someone else. It's Mravinsky.
It's regrettable that Mravinsky never recorded the 4th - I'm intrigued to think what he'd have done with it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: blondheim

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
I was curious about this Sanderling set myself. What are the interpretations like?
I find them quite exciting, with exceptional detail. You can find a fair number of them on YouTube:


Presto Classical also has high quality excerpts on their site:

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8619684--shostakovich-symphonies-nos-1-3
https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8619686--shostakovich-symphonies-nos-5-6
https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8619689--shostakovich-symphonies-nos-9-12
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I find them quite exciting, with exceptional detail. You can find a fair number of them on YouTube:
Actually the entire Michael Sanderling cycle is on YouTube, every symphony and movement, uploaded by Sony. I have no idea why the labels do this -- it would seem to cannibalize their media sales.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
Actually the entire Michael Sanderling cycle is on YouTube, every symphony and movement, uploaded by Sony. I have no idea why the labels do this -- it would seem to cannibalize their media sales.
I think they do receive a portion of ad revenues, and they probably view it as advertising for other delivery methods besides. Presumably the accountants have some formula for working out which approach makes more money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I also like the M.Sanderling cycle a lot - great sound - and in comparison to the Petrenko I find it emotionally more involving - the Rozhdestvensky and Kondrashin are -obviously-also very good indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
I prefer Askenazy, but I am not sure whether it qualifies as a cycle since it is done with three different orchestras. It is a really hard-hitting cycle, though! Strange that no-one has mentioned it yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I have always been uncertain of conductors who used to be famous soloists. I know all conductors had to have studied at least one instrument, but when someone became so famous doing one thing for so long, I feel it can't help but lend an odd bias towards or against a certain kind of interpretation. I know I am probably very wrong about this overall, but it is a feeling I have had a hard time shaking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
I prefer Askenazy, but I am not sure whether it qualifies as a cycle since it is done with three different orchestras. It is a really hard-hitting cycle, though! Strange that no-one has mentioned it yet.
You're correct that it's rarely mentioned, but I believe that I mentioned it quite early in this thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
I have always been uncertain of conductors who used to be famous soloists. I know all conductors had to have studied at least one instrument, but when someone became so famous doing one thing for so long, I feel it can't help but lend an odd bias towards or against a certain kind of interpretation. I know I am probably very wrong about this overall, but it is a feeling I have had a hard time shaking.
If you're talking about Ashkenazy, I think that he's a better conductor than an instrumentalist. And I would say the same of Casals and Menuhin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I am not knowledgeable enough about pianists to have an informed opinion here, but I will check out his conducting, I love Rachmaninoff and I know he has a set with the Concertgebouw that gets reviewed well. Piano is the one instrument that I actually think could benefit a conductor very much and I enjoyed his piano playing when he performed under Andre Previn doing Rachmaninoff concertos. I admit that I haven't heard enough interpretations to weigh them against one another well. I have made it a mission to listen to more concertos this year for this reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #78 ·
I have always been uncertain of conductors who used to be famous soloists. I know all conductors had to have studied at least one instrument, but when someone became so famous doing one thing for so long, I feel it can't help but lend an odd bias towards or against a certain kind of interpretation. I know I am probably very wrong about this overall, but it is a feeling I have had a hard time shaking.
It seems to me that a soloist claiming to be a conductor is like a person who had been operated on claiming to be a surgeon. :rolleyes:
 
61 - 80 of 92 Posts
Top