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What musicals/plays do you like? Has anyone seen "Oklahoma!"? Do you like musicals at all? I thought "Oklahoma!" was kind of wierd because everyone picks on Judd and then they are happy when he dies, but he hasn't really done anything to them, and Gershwin makes it seem like Judd's death is a good thing. At least that is the way it was in the tape I rented of it. I never saw it in the theatre. If you saw the tape, don't you hate the type of scenes like when the girls are dressing and when the main girl is having the dream? If noone ever saw it, then just write your opinions on other musicals you've seen. :D
 

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I love musicals. Everytime I go on a road trip I pack a few CD's of muscals to pass the time. The Phantom of the Opera is my favorite. I saw it in Toronto at an impressionable age (15.) I also really like Evita, Les Mis, Fiddler on the Roof, Cats and the West Side Story. I've seen the West Side Story as performed my St. Ignasius (sp?) high school in Cleveland. The rest I've only seen the movies or haven't seen at all ... but I have the soundtracks to all of them and more. It's kind of embarassing, but I know the words to almost all of them ... spoken lines, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Originally posted by daniel@Aug 7 2004, 04:53 AM
Musicals aren't my favourite. They sound for me very similar each piece. About plays, i would say i like Schiller and Shakespeare plays best
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Me, too. I only like a few of the songs from certain musicals. B) I love Macbeth.
 

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Originally posted by Rhadamanthus@Aug 6 2004, 09:42 PM
What musicals/plays do you like?
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I LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE the phantom of the opera!!!!! LOL. My dream and goal is to be Christine in the Phantom...I mean play the part. I have never seen The Phantom of the Opera, but....I do have all the sheet music and whole entire script as well as the 2 disc CD of the original cast and another version of it! There is also a musical called, "Phantom," based on the same story...and written at the same time as Andrew LLyodd Webber wrote his. The music is so beautiful it can break your heart *sniffles.* I love My Fair Lady, especially the song, "I Could Have Danced All Night," which I have sung many many many times lol in public. I want to see Rocky Horror Picture Show...because I did the timewarp with some people in some talent show and it was so fun! I know so many songs from musicals...but I haven't seen many! I seen, "The King And I," on video...it was awesome!!!! I seen, "The Sound of Music," on video also. I seen "South Pacific," which was not a favorite of mine...it was kind of corny too me...but I sang Bali Hai from that musical...which was very very very fun...and it is a beautiful song. I seen The Wizard of Oz which I hated because it is so overplayed. Oh! I want too see the Lion King on musical! And I want to tour as Tuptim from, "The King and I." I love musicals! Tee hee!!! :D
 

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me too :D. I love shakespeare, all his work is nice, so far I've read king lear, macbeth, and hamlet :rolleyes:. they're all wonderful :D

MacBeth was turned into an opera by verdi. I heard a bit of it, with fischer-dieskau, I was impressed by how verdi manages to keep the atmosphere of the play, despite the cuts, and the less than perfect italian libretto (not everybody is shakepeare) .
 

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Oh yeah, Shakespeare is the best. I don't like to read it, though. It needs to be performed! I've seen the Comedy of Errors at OSU and the Tempest, which was performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company (that performance was great.) I also enjoy the movies, both recent and old ones.
 

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Has anyone seen Les Miserables? I've heard about this play so many times, but I've never heard what it's about. The poster intrigues me with the painting of the child. The story doesn't sound too perky from the title does it? lol
 

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The Angel of Music said:
I LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE the phantom of the opera!!!!! LOL.
There are profound reasons why some things are still better left as they are.
I caught the Phantom film a few mths back...
There simply was too much nonsense and practically too much singing.
They shouldn't have toyed with the original stage play.
Leave it alone people!
:mad:
I love Shakespeare also... except Merchant of Venice.
 

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Into the Woods is one of my favorites.
 

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What musicals/plays do you like? Has anyone seen "Oklahoma!"? Do you like musicals at all? I thought "Oklahoma!" was kind of wierd because everyone picks on Judd and then they are happy when he dies, but he hasn't really done anything to them, and Gershwin makes it seem like Judd's death is a good thing. ... :D
I don't know what Gershwin has to do with this, but you prove perceptive in identifying the Judd problem as you do. Oklahoma! was the first of the several musicals I've had an opportunity to direct, and the Judd issue can indeed make one uncomfortable. As an ironist I seek out irony in drama, and the relationship of Curly and Judd is a splendid example of irony. We have a story proposing a friendly relationship between antagonists, farmers and cattle herders ("cowmen") (a classic "western" conflict), and the "hero", Curly, who should be working to promote the friendship, actually spurs up antagonism and hatred. Of course, the "friendship" between cowmen and farmers is cemented through marriage in this play, not through a more logical agreement of pure tolerance and cooperation and understanding of the conflicted parties. When one considers the era in which this play was written and the various conflicts facing America and the world in that era (conflicts such as race and religious and nationalistic bigotry), one may find the solution Oklahoma! proposes as ironical, as well. Marriage was often the last solution for settling such prejudices, in favor of less intimate solutions such as treaties and mutual agreements of give-and-take.

It remains a problematical story. But the music, by Richard Rodgers and librettist Oscar Hammerstein II, still reigns superb.

You might enjoy reading the following article: https://www.onstageblog.com/columns/2016/4/20/poor-jud-fry-a-different-perspective-on-oklahoma

Meanwhile, continue exploring musicals, theatre, and music in general. With your apparent sense of perception, you should find much to ponder. And, you should find that that very pondering enhances your understanding of life itself. Which is what art is actually all about.
 

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I don't know what Gershwin has to do with this, but you prove perceptive in identifying the Judd problem as you do. Oklahoma! was the first of the several musicals I've had an opportunity to direct, and the Judd issue can indeed make one uncomfortable. As an ironist I seek out irony in drama, and the relationship of Curly and Judd is a splendid example of irony. We have a story proposing a friendly relationship between antagonists, farmers and cattle herders ("cowmen") (a classic "western" conflict), and the "hero", Curly, who should be working to promote the friendship, actually spurs up antagonism and hatred. Of course, the "friendship" between cowmen and farmers is cemented through marriage in this play, not through a more logical agreement of pure tolerance and cooperation and understanding of the conflicted parties. When one considers the era in which this play was written and the various conflicts facing America and the world in that era (conflicts such as race and religious and nationalistic bigotry), one may find the solution Oklahoma! proposes as ironical, as well. Marriage was often the last solution for settling such prejudices, in favor of less intimate solutions such as treaties and mutual agreements of give-and-take.

It remains a problematical story. But the music, by Richard Rodgers and librettist Oscar Hammerstein II, still reigns superb.

You might enjoy reading the following article: https://www.onstageblog.com/columns/2016/4/20/poor-jud-fry-a-different-perspective-on-oklahoma

Meanwhile, continue exploring musicals, theatre, and music in general. With your apparent sense of perception, you should find much to ponder. And, you should find that that very pondering enhances your understanding of life itself. Which is what art is actually all about.
Have you seen the current Broadway revival?

https://www.broadwayworld.com/reviews/Oklahoma-

I'm a New Yorker and saw my first musical at age 5 - "My Fair Lady." Favorites include "Gypsy," "Sweeney Todd," "Guys and Dolls," "and She Loves Me" (the most underrated musical of all time). "West Side Story" is up there, but the text (book and lyrics) are not great. The original 1966 Broadway production of "Cabaret" may have been the most shocking. I've only seen "Hamilton" once, but it may join the list.
 

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Have you seen the current Broadway revival?
No, I have not. I would, however, welcome such an opportunity.

I remain open to new interpretations of classic works. I maintain that the greater the play, the more open to interpretation it is. One need not "like" every interpretation, and one will certainly find favorites among the several he/she experiences. And it remains just as wrong to attempt radically "different" interpretations of a work as it is to simply duplicate something that has already been produced. The producer/director/designer should approach the script with a serious sense of attempting to render a "true" manifestation of the meaning of the play, whatever that itself means. Even when the directorial approach is to allow the audience to derive personal meaning from the visual rendering of the script, that approach must still rely upon grasping the interpretive clues (metaphors, symbols, characterizations, design suggestions) inherent in the script. I tend to prefer playscripts in which the playwright has not encumbered the script with too much setting verbiage. Shakespeare's scripts are fine examples, where the director/producer/designer has free reign to use imagination. The idea still remains to stay "true" to the individual script. One can produce an adventurous Hamlet that is simply wrong, or an adventurous Hamlet that clicks on all cylinders.

Classics such as Oklahoma! often prove problematical for audiences who (erroneously, I argue) expect to see the film version rendered on the stage. Sometimes the slightest variation from the familiar strikes in them a sour chord and leading to an overall disfavor with the work. A skillfully rendered interpretation should set aside most of these consternations to allow the viewers to "get" the work. Still, some productions are more successful than others.

I had opportunity to direct Oklahoma! twice, some decades apart. Both of my interpretations respected the traditions of the play, with an obvious western setting and traditional costuming. Still, much differed from production one to production two. I recall that one of my favorite features in my second production was the use of a come-to-life scarecrow which interacted with the characters in various scenes and song numbers, from Curly's entrance through the corn field through to playing a banjo at the wedding fest. Was this a fantastical Oklahoma! from the universe of the Wizard of Oz? Perhaps. But it was still Oklahoma!

One likely never gets the full sense of any play (except maybe the shallowest of the shallowest) from any single viewing, which is why it is important to experience a variety of interpretations. The same with great musical works. The various interpretations allow for an expansion of consciousness in one's appreciation of a work. Which is good.

I've read Macbeth hundreds of times, seen dozens of productions, directed it once, and I am still learning about the universe of that play. It's vastness of consciousness continues to confound and amaze, but it also lures me onward to keep exploring. And only the greatest of art can do such.it

Oklahoma! may not be on a par with Hamlet or Macbeth, but it is still a good work of art and has much to offer those who seek to know it. Hopefully directors will continue offering new visions of this piece. It certainly deserves the time and effort.
 

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Shakespeare's scripts are fine examples, where the director/producer/designer has free reign to use imagination. The idea still remains to stay "true" to the individual script. One can produce an adventurous Hamlet that is simply wrong, or an adventurous Hamlet that clicks on all cylinders.
I can totally agree with you. Shakespeare is a true genius, and he knew for sure how to write poetry in a way, which would everyone love and be amazed. I've recently could find pretty nice article of shakespeare facts and what exactly helped him to be one of the most famous writers of the world.
 

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My favorite musicals are:

West Side Story by Bernstein and Sondheim, for the music, not so much for the story line which I don't find to be terribly profound. Still every tune is a hit!

Fiddler On The Roof by Bock and Harnick, for the music, as well as, for the message which is quite profound and universal; and the balance between preserving the values and sense of identity we get from "tradition"; and opening ourselves up to new ideas and to others who may not agree with our world view, is an important dichotomy.

Chess by two of the members of ABBA; because I'm as obsessed with chess as I am with classical music.
 
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