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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a music co-ordinator in a primary school. I have only been in the role for a short amount of time but have introduced to assemblies a game so that the chidlren listen to the music more carefully when they come into assembly.

What I have done so far is Guess the Animal ( listening to the Carnival of the animals and children guess which animal they think the music is portraying). I have also done guess the planet, and guess the country, and guess what the music is advertising.

I would now like to do themes like the weather, insects, fairy tale characters, nursery rhyme characters or even any other ideas for themes. Please does anybody have any suggestions of what pieces of music I could use for any of these themes.

Thank you for your help
 

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The kids might like these-

Johann Strauss- The Thunder and Lightning Polka
J. P. Sousa- The Thunderer March

The only things that kind of jump to mind about fairytale/nursery rhyme characters are from operas; not sure the kids would like that-

La Cenerentola (Cinderella)- Rossini
Hansel und Gretel- Humperdinck?
Ma Mère l`Oye (Mother Goose)- Maurice Ravel (not opera)

That`s off the top of my head.
 

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Here are some more-

Chopin- 'Raindrop' Prelude for piano.
Debussy- from La Mer, Dialogue du vent et de la mer (Dialog between the wind and the ocean; approximate translation)
Grofe- from Grand Canyon Suite, Cloudburst

I think there are a few piano pieces about butterflies etc....
 

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Thought of another one- Rimsky-Korsakov`s Flight of the Bumblebee

How about scary music? Not sure what you could do with that, but there`s-

The Sorcerer`s Apprentice by Dukas
Night on Bald Mountain by Mussorgsky
Danse Macabre by Saint Saens

Maybe for Oct. 31st?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Scary music around Halloween - they will love that. I shall certainly use the Four Seasons and link it to weather. I also thought of Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty - Tchaikovsky.

Thank you for all your superb ideas.
 

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Scheherezade by Rimsky-Korsikoff. I wish I had heard that music as a kid. It has a certain magic to it that I'm sure children would love. You could read them the story of the One-Hundred-and-One Nights while they're listening to it.
 

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I don't know if you would be interested in this kind of thing, but there's a website that promotes classical music education for children: http://www.classicsforkids.com/

It has an easy-to-understand musical dictionary, it has "radio" programs of shows that teach fun and substantial facts about each composer from Bach to Joplin. Under the games section, there's a composer game that involves listening to these "radio" shows after you select certain composers. I'm not embarrassed to admit that I listened to all of them and learned a thing or two... or twenty!

You might want to check this out, CdL.
 

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Thanks for the suggestions folks. I will look into introducing these pieces to my daughter. And I think that she will be happy.
 

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I'm going to be the ***hole of the thread here, but I really don't think these type of games are going to help kids learn about music. I'm very interested it music education so this is an important topic to me. Do the kids get the question "wrong" if they don't guess the "right" image? I mean, not only are there going to be kids whose brain doesn't process music in a way that includes elaborate imagery, the kids who do are going to come up with different images from what the composer was thinking. I think it's kind of a dubious aspect to base a music lesson on that doesn't really say much about the music itself (unless you want to teach kids that music should always be "about" something, and those who don't get that lose the game).

Why not come up with a lesson that is more neutral and has more to do with the actual music? Have them clap on every down beat maybe, so they learn about rhythm? Have them identify different instruments in a given piece so they learn about timbre? Teach them basic musical form and have them raise their hand or something when a new section comes up? I think there are lots of lessons like that that will teach them more about music than trying to guess what kind of imagery some composer might have intended their piece to portray, which to me seems very subjective and not very reliable for educational purposes. Though, it might be a fun game to play with your own kids on your personal time (like Albert seems to be thinking about doing).
 
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