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We know that many young people are accessing classical online. As regards this forum, all you can do is say your opinion, even if you feel its different. The worst thing for a forum like this is if everyone started parroting everybody else. We need a variety of opinions here.

Not to be a snob or a Debbie downer, but I believe that article is including essentially anything that's instrumental as classical. Virtually every artist listed would be described as "crossover", "contemporary instrumental", "electronic", "film", etc.. I don't think any of the listed artists would be remotely popular amongst the TC membership.
 

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I'm not sure that's true, but if it is, so what? The point of the article is to outline how young people are accessing, or could access classical music via a broad definition of the term which doesn't exclude the traditional canon, but exemplifies a wider range of musics.
They are of course free to listen to the music they wish to, but if the article was using a different definition of classical music than what the discussion in the thread was about, then this is surely an important thing to point out.
 

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There's a few contemporary composers who are taken seriously enough at TC (e.g. like Philip Glass, Michael Nyman, Steve Reich).
Yes, sorry. I shouldn't have been so absolute. Reich would be considered classical music by most, my issue was more with most of the other artists.


Also quite a few of the most famous composers - e.g. Mozart, Haydn, Schubert, Rachmaninov, Ravel, etc.


The main takeaway from the article is that many young people will listen to classical - or various offshoots of it - on their ipods. I think it might be a trend away from the stigma associated with classical among young people. In any case, the classical industry is taking heed of this sort of data to attract young people, with change in repertoire to accept what was previously thought as too lowbrow (e.g. orchestras performing film, video game and television music, opera companies putting on productions of musicals).
We may have different takeaways, but my takeaway was that young people will listen to some crossover artists that play pop-song sized segments of instrumental music.
 

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I don't have your concerns about the composers I mentioned, or others on those podcasts like John Adams, Eric Whitacre, John Williams, Ennio Morricone or Einaudi. One thing is that they all trained as classical composers.

I think that many young people aren't nearly as sectarian or self conscious about music as previous generations where. Basically, the categories we might argue about here matter little to them.



They obviously do listen to those, among other things. I don't see that as a negative but as a positive, since its obviously being harnessed by the classical industry to generate income.
I'm not saying this is good or bad, but when people here talk about the decline in classical music, my impression is they just aren't talking about a decline in listeners of someone like Einaudi. This is the disconnect I see with the BBC article.
 
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