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Popular music is highly "technical" though not in the sense that a virtuoso is technical. The objections many have to it, I always thought were less from amateur tendencies and more from it being a highly finished commercial product.

The idea of de emphasizing technical skill occurred in certain ways from folk, rock and punk scenes but not particularly pop.
 

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Politics is never related to classical music. Politics is about personal freedom, civil rights, equality and economy.

If you think that the progress in this fields of last decades are positive doesn't mean that you think that modern art is better than classical art.

And BTW classical music is not elitist, because it used to be popular some decades ago.
I believe this was about posts which are now deleted which explicitly veered into unrelated political directions.
 

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Here's an interesting story which may be entirely anecdotal.

I've actually noticed more of my younger "colleagues" than I've thought with at least some experience with classical music. Many of them aren't avid listeners, some are, but a lot can name a few pieces they like. In most cases, these are pieces beyond the popular repitoire.

I don't think any of them have ever paid, or expressed interest in going to see, a classical music concert.

Is this symptomatic of a problem, or just about what we'd expect of people who may like music but don't consider themselves avid listeners of it?
 

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I think there is a big difference between whether or not young people will listen to classical music and say "hey, that sounds alright", and whether or not they'll actually be interested in it. It's hard to force hobbies onto kids.
 

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Education doesn't get butts into concert seats. Passion does.

I was educated in Shakespare growing up. I like Shakespeare. I wouldn't really go to a Shakespeare performance because I don't really feel particularly passionate about doing so.
 

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Modernism didn't begin in the US in the 60/70s. Very loosely speaking it was a result of major cultural changes brought on by the Industrial Revolution, and then the first world war.


This is a really, really broad view of it, but when the great European civilizations spent the 1910s blowing each other to bloody pieces, there was a very specific reason people, including artists, became disenchanted with classicism.
 

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The trend I see is actually the opposite. The big problem I see these days is a severe pre-occupation with the past. While modernism had problems with a fetishization of the new, and utopian fallacies, it was trying to build something.

I don't want to delve too much into politics, but in terms of art, you have severe emphasis on attempting to "correct" mistakes in the past (for good and ill), and the commercialization of nostalgia (vis. constant remakes of films, nostalgia-centric media and music genres, etc) which can stymie creativity. There is in fact too much focus on relitigating the past versus building a future.
 

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Most young people just aren't the market for art music. Nothing that rewards careful attention is.

But at some point they are too old to go clubbing, some of them discover that the pop hits of their youth do not reward attention, some of them want to explore the world's cultural heritage, and some of them want to enjoy something classy, and then their white heads join the others.

I don't know that people will always be listening to Bach and Beethoven as much as we do now, but about 5% of the population (skewing older) will always be interested in something more complex and layered than what the other 95% is content with.

I think most people generally aren't into art music.

I've always wondered if going after the purported zero-attention-span "casual" young listener is a bit misguided rather than going after what you might call the "art-school-kid" type. Not that you have to, or should, do one or the other, but it's always going to be hard to get someone with no interest in art to listen to anything, versus someone who is already interested in music as art.

anyway this is just saying that the JACK Quartet should play Xenakis as an opener for like, Merzbow or some other noise artist
 

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I think people are confusing "young" with "general audience" here. There's a reason bargain record bins across the country are filled with Arthur Fiedler, and it wasn't because the "youth" were buying his records in droves.
 

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As with many things, it depends on why you listen and what you hope to get out of music.

Someone into clubbing doesn't want to listen to old music because music to them is part of an aesthetic that they want to keep up with the times, and to be fashionable.

Some art school kids, meanwhile, might not be interested because they want what's at the furthest cutting edge of the avant-garde, the stuff nobody is listening to.

Most people obviously fall between these categories, but you can't simply break it down into "kids aren't into old music because they're young".




By the way, I think pops classical in the 50s/60s, if anything, wasn't replaced by rock- it was the kind of stuff middle-aged, middle-class people listened to and was replaced by pop and adult-contemporary.
 

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Unfortunately radio isn't much of a thing anymore especially for young people. The equivilent might be playlists shared by friends or whatever Spotify or Youtube suggests.


I found this excerpt from a magazine interesting.

What does work, then? My evidence is admittedly anecdotal, but when I ask people what got them interested in classical music, they answer with things like: cartoons, movies, television shows, commercials, watching a live performance, learning an instrument. One thing that all these answers have in common is that they are all about experiencing classical music as music. Some other people mention getting interested through gateways like classical-esque sounds in the Beatles, or movie and video game soundtracks—though the division between “movie music” and “real music” has always been blurry (Shostakovich and Copland wrote for movies, after all), and there’s a whole scholarly subfield called ludomusicology devoted to the study of video game music. In any case, for most people I talked to, their interest was piqued not by being told that they should like the music, but by hearing music itself.

[...]

If you want to grow classical music’s audience (and you should), rather than arguing why people should like it, focus your efforts on giving them opportunities to encounter it and form their own associations with it. Share your favorite pieces. Organize performances for communities that might not otherwise get that experience. Again, don’t pre-interpret the music for them; let them come up with their own opinions. If they decide it’s cool, fine, but if not—that’s OK, too. After all, the opposite of “boring” isn’t “cool,” it’s “interesting.” ¶

(Classical Music Isn’t Cool)
 

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The question of "Organize performances for communities that might not otherwise get that experience" is an interesting one. Has anyone who plays an instrument or knows people who play instruments done this? I certainly think there are programs where you might be able to, e.g. play chamber music for youth centers or schools in areas which don't have the funding for proper arts programs, for instance.
 
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