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Nice tune, but listening to it would have never have thought it a minuet, a sarabande maybe. There really is no change in meter - you have a measure of 4/4 then two of 2/4, why not keep the whole passage in 3/4? The second 2/4 bar could be held for 3 beats, a performer probably would ritard the final chord anyway.

You also have a few parallel 5th, like in the 4/4 bar. Also the ii-III-iv-ii 6/5 then i over the iv pedal does not make sense in this style
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice tune, but listening to it would have never have thought it a minuet, a sarabande maybe. There really is no change in meter - you have a measure of 4/4 then two of 2/4, why not keep the whole passage in 3/4? The second 2/4 bar could be held for 3 beats, a performer probably would ritard the final chord anyway.

You also have a few parallel 5th, like in the 4/4 bar. Also the ii-III-iv-ii 6/5 then i over the iv pedal does not make sense in this style
If you pay close attention to where the upbeats go, then you would agree with they way I changed the meter. The final chord in 2/4 couldn't have been sustained. You try it yourself, and it just would feel too awkward. I had to change it.

I also know that there were parallel 5th. I was going to fix it, but I was like 'nah it's fine'.

Also the ii-III-iv-ii 6/5 then i over the iv pedal does not make sense in this style
Why not?
 

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If you pay close attention to where the upbeats go, then you would agree with they way I changed the meter. The final chord in 2/4 couldn't have been sustained. You try it yourself, and it just would feel too awkward. I had to change it.

I also know that there were parallel 5th. I was going to fix it, but I was like 'nah it's fine'.

Why not?
If you are going to write in this style then you need to follow its conventions otherwise it just sounds like wrong notes.
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_modulation

In music, metric modulation is a change in pulse rate (tempo) and/or pulse grouping (subdivision) which is derived from a note value or grouping heard before the change. Examples of metric modulation may include changes in time signature across an unchanging tempo, but the concept applies more specifically to shifts from one time signature/tempo (metre) to another, wherein a note value from the first is made equivalent to a note value in the second, like a pivot or bridge. The term "modulation" invokes the analogous and more familiar term in analyses of tonal harmony, wherein a pitch or pitch interval serves as a bridge between two keys. In both terms, the pivoting value functions differently before and after the change, but sounds the same, and acts as an audible common element between them. Metric modulation was first described by Richard Franko Goldman[2] while reviewing the Cello Sonata of Elliott Carter, who prefers to call it tempo modulation.[3] Another synonymous term is proportional tempi.[4]
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_modulation

In music, metric modulation is a change in pulse rate (tempo) and/or pulse grouping (subdivision) which is derived from a note value or grouping heard before the change. Examples of metric modulation may include changes in time signature across an unchanging tempo, but the concept applies more specifically to shifts from one time signature/tempo (metre) to another, wherein a note value from the first is made equivalent to a note value in the second, like a pivot or bridge. The term "modulation" invokes the analogous and more familiar term in analyses of tonal harmony, wherein a pitch or pitch interval serves as a bridge between two keys. In both terms, the pivoting value functions differently before and after the change, but sounds the same, and acts as an audible common element between them. Metric modulation was first described by Richard Franko Goldman[2] while reviewing the Cello Sonata of Elliott Carter, who prefers to call it tempo modulation.[3] Another synonymous term is proportional tempi.[4]
What makes you think I don't know this??? Listen to the minuet AGAIN!
 

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Well I find it quite a pleasing tune. I don't have a problem with any parallel 5ths to my ear anyway. I don't know that composers need to adhere to all "rules" (old conventions) around a style that we don't have any obligation to fully commit to. Rule #1: there are no rules. Rule #2: refer to Rule #1
 
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