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A case can be made (I will make it) that the passage of time and the increasing number of tools available to composers allows for an ever-increasing palette of "colors", rhythms, longer-winded melodies, etc that were not available to composers of earlier eras. Hence there is more to hear and more to love as we approach and reach Bartok, Martinu, Stravinsky, Ravel, Debussy, even Respighi. I began mostly with 20th century music and have moved back in time over the decades to Mozart, Bach & company, finding much treasure in the older music. It may be what we first hear and have imprinted on us that determines our early enthusiasms, but as the years pass, the Captain will likely also discover the joys of earlier music, though not necessarily in the same abundance as, say, from Brahms to Bartok.
 

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Less moving music=lame for the most part?
I still don’t understand how you can love everything Mozart wrote when he is basically the Bach of classical music and create this thread with this title
I don't want to put words in the Captain's mouth, but he may have meant that Mozart sticks out like a sore thumb from the rest of the classical composers, He is the Bach of classical, but all alone (in the Captain's view). I regard Beethoven as the key transitional figure, not as a full-bore classicist.
 
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