Classical Music Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
"Witness the venerable German composer, Karlheinz Stockhausen, whose shocking remarks at a press conference at a music festival in Hamburg six days after the attacks made headlines. The events of 9/11, he'd enthused, were "the greatest work of art imaginable for the whole cosmos." Things had gone from bad to worse to incendiary when, like Batman's Joker, he warmed to his theme: "Minds achieving something in an act that we couldn't even dream of in music, people rehearsing like mad for ten years, preparing fanatically for a concert, and then dying; just imagine what happened there. You have people who are that focused on a performance and then 5,000 people are dispatched to the afterlife, in a single moment. I couldn't do that. By comparison, we composers are nothing."
Stockhausen's comments produced immediate repugnance worldwide. "To the victims of terrorism," wrote a commentator for the Frankfurt Allgemeine Zeitung, the composer's "mental *descent into hell … must seem like hideous mockery." Although Stockhausen subsequently claimed he had been misunderstood [S4], he became a pariah for a while in Europe and North America. His concerts at the music festival were canceled; his daughter, a pianist, said she would no longer perform using the Stockhausen name. When he died, in 2007, many obituarists mentioned the 9/11 scandal; indeed, for some, it overshadowed his extraordinary musical career."
https://nymag.com/news/9-11/10th-anniversary/karlheinz-stockhausen/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
MR. MR, I told you before,- if you found that video too offensive due to the political backgrounds of its creators, you should try instead:
I don't think anyone's arguments should be judged based on their political backgrounds. They should only be judged for the soundness of their logic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
Wagner wrote an opera about Rienzi (an politican) for example, so of course it is at least somewhat political. But was he the first? Beethovens 3rd symphony for example sounds much more revolutionary than Haydn or Mozarts music and Beethovens first intention was to give it the Name "Buonaparte" but he changed his opinion when Napoleon became emperor. But not only Beethovens music stands for more revolutionary politics, Haydns and Mozarts music, where everything is much in balance, kinda represent the ancien régimes.
Mozart was also innovative, just in a different way. I know many people consider his music an endless stream of "pleasantness" due to the Classicism, but if you look carefully, you'll see there's more to it than just "pleasantness".

"Look at Idomeneo. Not only is it a marvel, but as Mozart was still quite young and brash when he wrote it, it was a completely new thing. What marvelous dissonance! What harmony!" -Brahms, 1896
View attachment 148131
"Written between May and June 1785, Mozart C minor Fantasy KV 475 is a perfect illustration example of what Brahms had in mind when proclaiming Mozart as "a fellow modernist." ...
... Yes, the missing tonality was in fact C minor; "atonality" is of course not justified, but it was certainly hinted…Adorno's « hegemony of tonality» remains and Mozart's acquisitions anticipate those of Wagner, transforming musical language « only indirectly, by means of the amplification of the tonal space and not through its abolition»""

< The Aesthetic State: A Quest in Modern German Thought, by Josef Chytry, P. 291 >
"This also explains why Mozart was not a political animal: the state was of even less interest to him than society, with political theories belonging in the realm of abstraction, a world that could not be grasped through the senses and for which he therefore had no time. Here, as elsewhere, there was a vast gulf between him and his father, who was unusually interested in both the theory of practice and politics. For Mozart, conversely, political principles were a matter of almost total indifference and he had time only for the people who represented them, hence the fact that in his choice of friends he never allowed himself to be influenced by political considerations. ...
... Striking, by contrast, are the frequent professions of Germanness that we have already encountered and that we shall encounter on many further occasions in the course of the following pages. In this, Mozart was markedly different from both Haydn and Beethoven. That these were not merely occasional outbursts is clear from their sheer number. Nor was this the egoistical patriotism of his father, a sentiment born of hatred and envy of the Italians, but the increasingly clear awareness that, thanks to the actions of Frederick the Great, intellectual forces were beginning to stir in Germany that he recognized as more closely related to his own view of the world than the spirit that blew in from abroad. As a result, he was not a patriot in the modern, middle-class sense of the term and was probably something more than this: he was pleased to have discovered new wellsprings of artistic strength on German soil and insisted on their exploitation in order to increase Germany's might and prestige. Even today, we may reckon this to his credit."
< W.A. Mozart , by Hermann Abert , P. 736~737 >
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
"During the 1960s and 1970s, Pollini was a left-wing political activist. He collaborated with Luigi Nono in such works as Como una ola de fuerza y luz (1972), which was to mourn the accidental death of Luciano Cruz, a leader of the Chilean Revolutionary Front. He performed with Claudio Abbado at La Scala in a cycle of concerts for students and workers, in an attempt to build a new public as they believed that art should be for everybody. At least one of Pollini's recitals was beset by audience unrest and concluded upon police intervention when he mentioned Vietnam. Pollini has said that he now questions the way left-wing activists operated in Italy, although he still identifies with the left."

btw, I find him overrated:
(listening to this performance, I feel "maybe Stockhausen is the sort of repertoire he should have specialized in")
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top