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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I grew up with a piano, it was my grandmother's and she gave it to my mom. It was a great way to start my music career ;) I started banging on it when I was very little.

I was wondering if a good quality electric keyboard would make a good substitute for a piano for kids. I don't think I'll be able to afford a piano for my home for a quite a while, unless someone is trying to get rid of an old upright. But I've seen some pretty nice keyboards that have the same size keys as pianos that are way more in my budget. I want my kids to grow up with music like I did, but I'm not ready to fork out the cash for a piano!

Of course, if a child eventually really takes to the piano, I'll need to get one. I was just thinking in terms of a starter instrument!
 

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How old are your kids?

It is fine to start on a digital piano. There are some that are superior to real pianos. If the kids advance fast though, you'll have to buy a piano soon.

Edit: Second Violin with 10 posts? I thought it would be something like "Page Turner" after Orchestra n00b. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually, my daughter is 1, so I have a bit of time to worry about it. We also plan on having more. I just was looking at pianos and nice keyboards (may have even been called electric pianos) and realizing that we don't have one and I always had one around when I was growing up! I want the same for my kids.

I think I'll hit 1st violin at 50 posts. I can't wait because I have a 1st violin personality!
 

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I like electronic keyboards best because of how many voices there are and how you can play MIDI, and digitally record them without a studio. But then I'm a composer, and I compose mainly for orchestra. If I were a pianist who played concertos I think I might feel differently, but I'm not that great at performing. My keyboard has 61 keys, like most. My pet peeve, though is the Casio brand of keyboard. They may be fine for a beginner but I personally just hate them! MIne is a good Yamaha. There may be more realistic sounding ones but this is pretty good and is the best I know of. (If someone knew of a REALLY good one that beats Yamaha I would be ineterested to hear, though.)
 

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I have a 73-key Casio only used to input MIDI into my computer (via SB Extigy).
I have to say, that it's hell to play on it.

I have a Samick WSU-131MD upright. It sounds...decent to most people (to me it sounds horrible) and has partial sostenuto. Got it for ~~6000USD.
 

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I have a Yamaha YDP-223 digital piano. It is fantastic to learn and practice on. The sound is very real. The pedaling is realistic. It has concert grand hammer action. It looks like a piano (can be a piece of furniture) but can be lifted by two 10 year-olds. The cost is around $1500 US. For the money, I can't think of a better value. Obviously, you never have to tune it which helps when beginning to learn. It has a built in metronome, 50 classical masterpieces sampled in that you can slow the tempo to help learn(of all degrees of difficulty), It has 64 note polyphony, a few different sounds, built-in speakers. You can turn the volume down to practice at night or use headphones. When you get to a certain level of proficiency you will need to get the real thing, but for now, a digital piano is a great compromise to the real thing IMHO.

Hope this helps.--Tim
 

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yeah, sure. A keyboard is okay, so long as the proper things are being taught and absorbed, and most importantly, as in ALL music lessons...let yr kids have a good time! :)
But be sure to get a piano ( u know, touch and hearing blah blah blah :) ).....when they've started on an exam/formal mode of learning.
 

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The only good thing about electronic keyboard is the price and maybe portable. Electronic keyboard's keys are too soft and you don't even have to apply a bit force to make it sound. Thus, making your son/daughter's finger muscles not that strong. Your child's finger may end up slow and weak. Also you cant' make soft, loud, cresendo, etc. on an electric keyboard. Your child will be a boring player if he/she practice on an electriconic keyboard daily. I will not reccomend it to a begginner or even a proffesional pianist. Use a real piano.
 

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Well, based on my experience, I don't think a keyboard would be a great substitute for the piano, especially for younger kids who may eventually take up piano. Here's why.

The first instrument I got was a small keyboard when I was 6, which I just loved. I learned to play my first songs on it, and eventually, my parents thought me well enough to enroll me in piano lessons. HOWEVER, because I had become so used to the keyboard, my wrist posture was horrible. Instead of holding my wrist upright, I habitually dropped them (like that on a computer keyboard). It took me several years and many pennies (by putting a penny on the back of my wrist when I practiced) to correct this problem.
Also, because the keys on the keyboard were so small, I didn't develop necessary elasticity between my fingers to reach the keys on an actual piano. Therefore, I had to practice a few more years before I adapted to the piano.
So, the question becomes now, would you want your child to continue on, after the initial excitement with the keyboard, to piano lessons? If so, I do not recommend buying a keyboard first because there are so many problems derived from keyboard practice alone.
My 2 cents.
----
Rescon

Don't know how to read music? Want to play piano? Come to Resonance Connection, where you'll find step-by-step tutorials about the basics of music theory and piano playing.
recon.awardspace.com
 

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I don't know if I'm breaking some kind of site etiquette by posting in a thread that nobody's touched in a month, so I'm sorry if I am.

A really good keyboard is pretty good, although you really can't beat the real thing. I don't know how much it cost, and the company that made mine is now out of business, but I play on a full-scale keyboard with pressure-sensitive keys and pedals. Since I'm only 15, I don't know how much it cost us, or how much it is compared to a piano. That was also quite some time ago.

A less pianoesque keyboard might be worth it for the beginning, but even with my rather good keyboard I know it's nothing compared to a piano. A lot of good musicianship is being in tune with the mechanics of your instrument, and there's nothing quite like actually manipulating a piano.
 

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I have an electronic piano... if that makes any sense. It feels just like a real piano, but is electronic. I'm sure there are some out there that are cheaper than a real one. It's by Kurzweil if you're interested
 

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If you have a really good electronic piano it may sound similar to a piano...
but a melody that comes out.... I mean that's a whole different story.... Feeling on a piano
is richer, how should i explain, on piano you get a real satisfaction...
I've just get yamaha electric piano and i own also upright piano and I steel prefer upright piano. I can't explain it, but when you play it for real you just can't play it on a electric piano.
In my opinion it's defenitly better to buy a non electric piano, even if it's a upright piano. And price of a upright piano and electronic piano it's equivalent.
Also the big problem on electric piano is that you can play fff or ppp...

And sorry for my english :D
 

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Hmm...I may be in trouble then!

I have music experience from violin and clarinet...but I recently signed up for private piano lessons from a classical pianist(she's a violinist too!)...but I don't have a piano, just a cheap keyboard that have no weight for the keys...I can't really afford an upright right now, since im only 15 yrs old...I don't want to get used to my keyboard that it hinders my piano playing...Any suggestions?=(
 

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You might check with local music stores who sell pianos to see if they can arrange for practice priveleges, like in a soundproof room; maybe even a local college or church/synagogue, too. Your piano teacher might also have some suggestions.

Some music stores also rent pianos ... At least imho, proper technique for piano can only be learned on a mechanical piano. Good luck in your quest.

Kh
 

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I'm quite uneducated on this subject. So please spare me.

I like them both. However the feeling of having and playing a real piano is much better IMO.

However, I have to say keyboards are amazing too. Especially when you take the time to find a really nice one. My parents just bought me one for a graduation present. I like how it's not out of tune at all. Our piano is TERRIBLY out of tune. The two highest notes sound the same on it! (just to give an example.)

I would have to go for a real piano, though. Acoustic instruments are just so much better. Knowing that the sound of my keyboard is artificial kind of bothers me... no matters how good it sounds.
 

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In August my brother and his wife had their first baby, a beautiful little girl, and in a fit of insanity they chose me to be godmother. For her Christening, I gave her a piano.

I would never dream of allowing a child in my family to grow up in a house without a piano. She's too young to play now, of course, but my father visits every few days and plays it for her. She sits on his lap and even reaches for the same keys he plays! So she's getting beautiful music in her life, and learning some motor skills. When she gets older she'll be able to experiment with sounds by banging on the keys, and eventually she may even learn to play. In the meantime, she will have live music in her home a few times a week.

I found that piano in the classifieds. Often you can find very cheap pianos ($200-$400) and sometimes even free (you just pay for the movers). The one I bought was $800, for an 1880s upright grand. Repairs cost a few hundred more, but my piano tuner loved it, told me it was a steal. My goddaughter will have that piano the rest of her life. It's not a toy, it's an instrument and an investment.

You cannot get that sound, that action, that feel out of an electronic piano. You end up paying more for an instrument that just isn't the same. Right now I have a digital Yamaha (P70) which is ok, but I would trade it in a second . . . a SECOND . . . for a real piano, however poor the quality. (I move too often for a real piano . . . can't take an upright on an airplane). I'm still learning, but I found that with a keyboard I had to make myself practice, whereas with a real piano I couldn't wait to play every day.

And Bassoonist, if your piano is out of tune . . . get it tuned!
 

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. . . You cannot get that sound, that action, that feel out of an electronic piano. You end up paying more for an instrument that just isn't the same. Right now I have a digital Yamaha (P70) which is ok, but I would trade it in a second . . . a SECOND . . . for a real piano, however poor the quality. (I move too often for a real piano . . . can't take an upright on an airplane). I'm still learning, but I found that with a keyboard I had to make myself practice, whereas with a real piano I couldn't wait to play every day.
I quite agree, Zlya. Recently was the accompanist for a 100+ mass choir in a concert. The 'piano' that was available was a digital one ... almost impossible to get the deep bass resonance of those low strings from an amplifier and tiny speakers that speak directly into ones knees :eek: !! It was not a great experience, and unfortunately there wasn't sufficient time to make a subsitution of instruments.
 
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