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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All classical string players seem to bow only with the right hand.
Obviously in an orchestral setting bowing in different directions could put someones eye out but are there any statistics on left handed string players- soloists or ensemble?
I know left handed people who play the guitar right handed but feel their technique has been limited by doing so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess there is no such thing as a left hand piano but I wonder what percentage of great virtuosii are left handed. And I wonder if Paavo Berglund, for example, strung his violin backwards too.

My son is left handed but I taught him to play guitar right handed because he'd then be able to pick up anyone's guitar and play. I got a shock when after a few years he was singing along to a rock track and strumming 'air' guitar- but backwards to the way he actually plays real guitar! Eek!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As a teacher who has taught both left and right handed violinists (I also have a left handed husband who is a professional cellist) I have come to the conclusion that there is no advantage or disadvantage to be left handed.
The truth about violin playing is that both bowing and fingering are difficult. No hand is more important than the other and neither has an easier job. Being right handed, my left hand doesn't feel hindered in any way now that I've mastered violin technique, and some of my most accomplished violin students are left handed and their bow arm is great!

Hope this helps!
Thanks, it's something I've wondered about. I guessed it must be the case but it would be interesting to know if the proportion of left handed professional string players is the same as in other occupations.
 
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