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I would also recommend purchasing this fantastic 3CD set on the Harmonia Mundi label:



Features selections from various song cycles as well as individual songs by various 19th century to early 20th century composers.
I'd appreciate if you say the composers and the ISBN. Danke

Martin
 

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I love these deeply:



Rachmaninov the first, my hero, Alban Berg, the second One.

I love Renée Fleming, I saw her last year in Montreal.

Martin, deeply dumb
 

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Some of these have been mentioned. Others have not.

1. Mahler - Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (cycle)
2. Duparc - esp. "Extase"
3. Poulenc - esp. "Hotel"
4. Brahms - Bernarda Fink on the Harmonia Mundi label and Hans Hotter's historic recordings (esp. "Der Tod, das is die kuhle Nacht")
5. R. Strauss - Vier Letzte Lieder (cycle)
6. Sibelius - von Otter on the BIS label (worth exploring!)
7. Barber - "There's Nae Lark"
8. Vaughan-Williams - House of Life (cycle)
9. Britten - The Charm of Lullabies (cycle)
10. Berg - Sieben Fruhe Lieder (cycle)
11. Wagner - Wesendonck Lieder (cycle)
 

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I don't believe Pfitzner was mentioned. Some of his orchestral lieds are fantastic, and DFD recorded an album of them. Here is a taste

Also, French composer Reynaldo Hahn has some fine songs, although they may be too sugary and poppish at times, I'm not sure if it is even classical music after all.

Les nuits d'été, by Berlioz, the first orchestral lied cycle, of course.
 

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Henri Duparc / Poulenc / Moussorgsky ~ Songs and Dances of Death; From the Nursury / Ravel (thread on TC w lots of good links, "Do you like Ravel's songs?) / Britten / Ives (100 + songs) / Barber (extensive rep) / Copland (Dickinson songs already mentioned) / Respighi / Dallapiccolo ~ Three Greek Lyrics, (with instrumental ensemble) / Berg / Kurtag (also many with small instrumental ensembles -- excellent stuff) / Messiaen ~ Poemes pour mi / De Falla /
 
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Also, French composer Reynaldo Hahn has some fine songs, although they may be too sugary and poppish at times, I'm not sure if it is even classical music after all.

Ackkkk! Where do we find these blasphemers!?!
 
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I suggest these 2 recordings as essential lieder of the orchestral variety. I'm shocked at how the price went up on this Mahler/Wagner/Boulez CD on Sony!

Mahler: Ruckert-Lieder / Wagner: Wesendonck-Lieder
Richard Wagner (Composer), Gustav Mahler (Composer), Pierre Boulez (Conductor), Yvonne Minton (Performer)

Mahler: Das Klagende Lied
Gustav Mahler (Composer), Helmuth Kolbe (Conductor), Pierre Boulez (Conductor), London Symphony Orchestra (Orchestra), London Symphony Orchestra Chorus (Performer), Elisabeth Söderström (Performer), Evelyn Lear (Performer), Ernst Haefliger (Performer), Ernst Hafliger (Performer), Stuart Burrows (Performer)

And the great disc of Webern's lieder in the DG Complete Works box, with a better singer than the Sony box. (IMHO)

I think you should listen to Aaron Copland's songs & choral works on this:

A Copland Celebration Vol. 3 [Original Recording Remastered]
Aaron Copland (Composer), Aaron Copland (Conductor, Performer), Columbia Symphony Orchestra (Orchestra), New York Philharmonic (Orchestra), William Warfield (Performer), Robert Hale (Performer), Richard Fredericks (Performer), Mildred Miller (Performer), Claramae Turner (Performer), Adele Addison (Performer), Richard Cassilly (Performer) | Format: Audio CD
 
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Please note that lieder are GERMAN art songs only.
On this illiterate side of the pond, and probably having easily caved in to the Hegemony of the German Music Cartel of the time, Lieder is used generally for "art song." Most of the population doesn't have a clue it is plural, either.

In Britain, its a Song.
In France, its a Chanson.
In Italy, its a Canzone etc.

Classical, the classical era / classical, all classical eras -- God help you if you want the general term and are starting a sentece with the word :)
 

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Thank you, and give my regards to Mrs. Obvious. :)

Anyway, Joseph Marx is worth checking out, especially Das Verklaerte Jahr (or Verklaertes Jahr?), probably his stylistically most advanced composition.
And let's not forget this great 'schlager' of his. :)
 

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Thank you, and give my regards to Mrs. Obvious. :)

Anyway, Joseph Marx is worth checking out, especially Das Verklaerte Jahr (or Verklaertes Jahr?), probably his stylistically most advanced composition.
And let's not forget this great 'schlager' of his. :)
Oh really, well your post says "Oh,not classical at all then,where do we put Josef Marx then ?". That to me means that you have accepted that Hahn is NOT classical.
In fact I believe that it was your "too sugary and poppish" that brought the "blasphemy" comment.
Let us keep to being civil shall we?
 

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On this illiterate side of the pond, and probably having easily caved in to the Hegemony of the German Music Cartel of the time, Lieder is used generally for "art song." Most of the population doesn't have a clue it is plural, either.

In Britain, its a Song.
In France, its a Chanson.
In Italy, its a Canzone etc.

Classical, the classical era / classical, all classical eras -- God help you if you want the general term and are starting a sentece with the word :)
I have never come across this and I was in the USA for six months of the year on business with many musical friends---how confusing for all.
Incidentally the French refer to their "lieder" as Melodies as in Poulenc's.
 
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I have never come across this and I was in the USA for six months of the year on business with many musical friends---how confusing for all.
Incidentally the French refer to their "lieder" as Melodies as in Poulenc's.
Confuseder and Confuseder, ain't it?
 
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