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My technique is impeccable, if there are any issue with the music it's with the software and samples. As I said the learning curve has been with producing the music, and I'll admit I'm a baby in the engineering world.

Will a professional orchestra be able to perform the work better? Of course.
Not really. Those with trained ears can easily get past the samples. I honestly think you have potential, but especially without training, which is what I gather from your response, you need to be more critical and open to improvement. The way you judge your own and MikeH's work, i don't think you have proper ear training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Not really. Those with trained ears can easily get past the samples. I honestly think you have potential, but especially without training, which is what I gather from your response, you need to be more critical and open to improvement. The way you judge your own and MikeH's work, i don't think you have proper ear training.
You have to give some context, I'm not getting what you're saying. I'll admit the tonality in that opening movement is all over the place, but that was the intention.

From what you said you either want it romantic like Mahler or off the rails like Schnittke, while that excerpt was a play on what is right and what isn't -- the duality is the purpose.

Mike is perpetually navel-gazing, his music says nothing, it is empty technique. Is that what you mean? That you enjoy either one way or the other and no duality?

To my knowledge the excerpt is highly original - no composer has done it like that. Will I write like that gain? Probably not, it's program music to depict something specific.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
You do have a problem with training don't you? You've missed the duality between composing and technique, rigour and emotion, control and freedom, inspiration and its context and the synergy between the two whilst writing.....how sad.
This is funny, you have potential as a comedian.
 

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You have to give some context, I'm not getting what you're saying. I'll admit the tonality in that opening movement is all over the place, but that was the intention.
"It's not accidentally bad, it's intentionally bad!" C'mon, man. Who appointed you judge of impeccable techniques? Why do you think you are qualified to judge your own merits?
 

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You have to give some context, I'm not getting what you're saying. I'll admit the tonality in that opening movement is all over the place, but that was the intention.

From what you said you either want it romantic like Mahler or off the rails like Schnittke, while that excerpt was a play on what is right and what isn't -- the duality is the purpose.

Mike is perpetually navel-gazing, his music says nothing, it is empty technique. Is that what you mean? That you enjoy either one way or the other and no duality?

To my knowledge the excerpt is highly original - no composer has done it like that. Will I write like that gain? Probably not, it's program music to depict something specific.
Well at least to me, and I don't think I'm alone by some responses, there wasn't really anything right. Based on what you say, I think you the goal of your music is more like Schnittke's. He would follow a certain tonality (and/or style) and change to another, or blend the 2 in separate voices. But yours was never one nor the other. There is no delineated duality, it's consistently muddled. I think you're taking what is unintentional, and saying it is intentional. You should stand back and listen to your music with fresh ears. There is a world of difference between intent and resulting effect.
 

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Who appointed you judge of impeccable techniques? Why do you think you are qualified to judge your own merits?
We composers are proud of nearly, if not, everything we write. But, it's the world that decides if what we do is "good", or if we have "impeccable technique", not ourselves. So he can claim whatever he wants, but he's not the arbiter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Well at least to me, and I don't think I'm alone by some responses, there wasn't really anything right. Based on what you say, I think you the goal of your music is more like Schnittke's. He would follow a certain tonality (and/or style) and change to another, or blend the 2 in separate voices. But yours was never one nor the other. There is no delineated duality, it's consistently muddled. I think you're taking what is unintentional, and saying it is intentional. You should stand back and listen to your music with fresh ears. There is a world of difference between intent and resulting effect.
No, Schnittke represents what is dying and degenerating. This represents something that strives to have order and sense, but is unjust, so it cannot be beautiful - it must be muddled. I have other pieces that follow order, if technique is what you long for then you'll enjoy those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
I'll release another excerpt of the same piece, it change a lot throughout, in a piece like this it's difficult to give a preview. The later piece has nothing in common with that opening, it's truly program music of extremely diverse subject matter.
 

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No, Schnittke represents what is dying and degenerating. This represents something that strives to have order and sense, but is unjust, so it cannot be beautiful - it must be muddled. I have other pieces that follow order, if technique is what you long for then you'll enjoy those.
Ok. Let me hear those. So you wrote this that itself strives to have order but couldn't, and consistently at that until the order and disorder is never delineated...
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Ok. Let me hear those. So you wrote this that itself strives to have order but couldn't, and consistently at that until the order and disorder is never delineated...
Timocracy never reaches order and it's never truly dysfunctional either.

"His origin is as follows: --He is often the young son of a grave father, who dwells in an ill-governed city, of which he declines the honours and offices, and will not go to law, or exert himself in any way, but is ready to waive his rights in order that he may escape trouble.

And how does the son come into being?
The character of the son begins to develop when he hears his mother complaining that her husband has no place in the government, of which the consequence is that she has no precedence among other women. Further, when she sees her husband not very eager about money, and instead of battling and railing in the law courts or assembly, taking whatever happens to him quietly; and when she observes that his thoughts always centre in himself, while he treats her with very considerable indifference, she is annoyed, and says to her son that his father is only half a man and far too easy-going: adding all the other complaints about her own ill-treatment which women are so fond of rehearsing." -- Plato on the timocracy
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
A lot of composers write off of their personal issues and complaints, many are navel-gazers, egocentric, and this is probably why classical music is not commercially viable.

If your life is a great triumph of overcoming extreme adversity like it was the case with Beethoven, then that can be the driving force behind the music - if your society is full of order and peace like it was in Mozart's time then that can be the inspiration - if nature deeply impacts your soul then that will be the source, as was the case with the romantics.


In my case there is nothing to write from except philosophy, and program music is all I'll probably ever write. There are just no issues to write about. If one gets absorbed into the degeneracy of today only horrendous atonal music comes out of it.
 

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In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which people assess their cognitive ability as greater than it is. It is related to the cognitive bias of illusory superiority and comes from the inability of people to recognize their lack of ability. Without the self-awareness of metacognition, people cannot objectively evaluate their competence or incompetence.
 
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