Classical Music Forum banner
21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,737 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
This is very good. The only place where I had some disappointment was when Scarpia is dying and she is saying, die! die! die! The single sylable word, die, just cannot carry the emotion as nicely IMO as does the two-sylable Italian word, morire!

 
  • Like
Reactions: VitellioScarpia

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,737 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Now listening to this one and it is very good too:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,737 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Wow, there are 97 Opera in English releases in Chandos' Opera-in-English discography! Some are aria sets and some are highlights but there are a lot of complete operas.
Bummer! I just went through the Chandos list and can't find one Bellini opera in it. If anyone knows of a Bellini opera sung in English, please let me know.

Meanwhile, I counted how many complete operas each composer had in the Chandos English series. I may have missed one but here are the results:

12 Verdi operas
6 Mozart
6 Puccini
6 Wagner
5 Janacek
5 Donizetti
4 Strauss
3 Rossini
2 each for Bizet, Gounoud, and Mascagni
And a dozen other composers at one opera each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
The Mackerras Cosí is fantastic. Hands down my favorite of any of the Chandon recordings I’ve heard.

Goodall’s Ring is the most God awful thing ever. What an a-hole and egomaniac he must have been to do what he did to Wagner’s music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,833 Posts
The Chandos recording of The Dialogues of the Carmelites should be included in the list. I wish the Met were to publish the 1987 Carmelites in English with Norman (Mme. Lidoine), Crespin (Mme. de Croissy), Quivar (Mere Marie), Ewing (Blanche), Norden (Constance) conducted by Manuel Rosenthal.

View attachment 136045
Why would they change the title of the opera, which is Dialogues of the Carmelites (Les dialogues des Carmélites)? Ridiculous!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Why would they change the title of the opera?
It does seem strange. But maybe the translator was trying to dodge the vexed question of the best English equivalent for French "Dialogues."

The script was ORIGINALLY written by Bernanos as an untitled screenplay for a proposed movie. The movie was never made. After his death, his posthumous editor published the script under the title "Dialogues des Carmélites." In the first half of the 20th century, "dialogues" was a standard name for a screenplay. ("Dialoguiste" is French for "screenwriter." And on lots of old French movies, one sees the credit "Dialogues par X" = "Screenplay by X.") So "Dialogues des Carmélites" was originally intended to mean simply "Screenplay about the Carmelites" or "Carmelite Screenplay."

But Poulenc's opera is a different matter. Since Poulenc retained the word "Dialogues" in his own title, he clearly didn't recognize that it meant "screenplay." (Perhaps he wasn't much of a cinemagoer.) He must have taken it to refer to the conversations between the characters. So, if I were translating his opera into English, I'd render its title something like "Carmelite Conversations."

It looks as if the team who made the Chandos recording decided to cut the Gordian knot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,737 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Another sung-in-English opera on DVD, which I just pulled from my unwatched pile and started viewing yesterday.
 
  • Like
Reactions: The Conte

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,833 Posts
Here's a glimpse of Sutherland the Wagnerian early in her career. It was a while before I recognized the language (I'm not a German speaker) - English! That makes total sense, since opera was usually sung in the vernacular in most countries in 1949.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
One recording that wasn't mentioned here but really needs a mention is Ormandy's Bluebeard's Castle. It's a brilliant performance with a translation that works perfectly and singers with great voices and great diction.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top