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A 2015 study of people’s listening habits on Spotify found that most people stop listening to new music at 33; a 2018 report by Deezer had it at 30. In my 20s, the idea that people’s appetite to consume new music regularly would be switched off like some kind of tap was ludicrous. However, now I’m 36, it’s difficult to argue with.
 

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For many people, music is a part of their self-identities. Most often, our self-identities are rather fixed by the time we are well into our 30s. I've heard the same thing about types of food or cuisine. Of course, there are exceptions. There are people who always crave the new and exciting, no matter how they self-identify. There are also people whose self-identities are never fixed throughout their lives.

I still find new music that I enjoy, and I'm 50, but there are bounds on what I try, compared to when I was in my teens and 20s. Also, the music of my youth connects with me emotionally in a way that I don't think any new music ever could.
 

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The survey needs to be widened to look at the listening habits of all age groups instead of implying that it's all downhill for new music once we're passed 30.

I stopped buying new in my 30s as I didn't have spare disposable income to waste on new music.

I resumed once I had some spare, and the market was easier to access. I'm still looking for new.
 

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How are we defining "new" - newly composed or new to the listener? I just turned 70, and I am exploring music all the time - however, much of it (classical and jazz) was composed decades or even centuries ago. I listen to relatively little popular music composed after 1980.

I am pleased to say that I recently added WFUV to my listening - my default during a workout. A nice blend of contemporary alt-rock (heavy on singer/songwriter) and songs from the classic rock era, although frequently "back wall" tracks.
 

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well, as life goes on people grow, but it isn't linear. If at 36 it seems like you are in a rut, its just a phase. If you just bought a motorcycle or sports car, its mid-life crisis.

nothing to worry about

If its any good to you, I'm a geezer and I just started listening to Jack White. That tune "Sixteen Saltines" really does it for me
 

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At around 30, or even before, I stoppped considering music an important part of my life, and barely listened to anything. At 45, in Covid time, I rediscovered this pleasure and became quite passionate again. However, I was conservative since my childhood, it was all opera and "popular classic". Trying to delve into POP and be a normal young person was unsatisfying. I am determined not to do such experiments anymore, because with kids, my time is limited and I am not on a partner hunt anymore :-D . I plan to explore e.g. opera new to me, but with some predictable limits. Bellini was a revelation at 45, but not so radically new after knowing some Rossini, Donizetti and Verdi. I will give a chance to formerly dismissed composers like Janacek, Poulenc, Strauss, but not much further than that.
 

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My experience is that classical listeners, especially the rabid collectors, are exploring new music well into senile old age. It's the people who listen to pop/rock whose tastes solidify around age 30 going into geezerhood still listening to the music that they did in high school and college years. Nostalgia is a funny thing.

I personally still buy a lot of disks of new music knowing that I'm probably going to be disappointed or disgusted. But every now and then something amazing comes up.
 

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It's the people who listen to pop/rock whose tastes solidify around age 30 going into geezerhood still listening to the music that they did in high school and college years. Nostalgia is a funny thing.
I have a friend who is in his mid-40s who is spending every weekend going to concerts of rock bands from the '70s and '80s that he listened to, like Three Dog Night, Loverboy, and Journey. He was amazed that a lot of the people in the crowd had grey heads. It was a wake-up call to him, that he's no longer young and rebellious just because he listens to classic rock.
 

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I have actually read "The Guardian" (brrr) article that OP references. It is about a situation when a young man or woman transitions into adulthood and misses the time when he/she used to be unattached, carefree and socialised around the latest mass-produced pop music. The author laments that he no longer feels the thrill, has little urge to follow the latest offerings and is unable to recreate the social milieu in his 30ies dotage. What does it have to do with maintaining a lively interest in CM as long as you live?
 

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Okay, I just skimmed the Guardian article, and now know it has nothing to do with my experience since I am not in my 30s and did not enter adulthood during the Internet age. Maybe those people are going through a period when music or new pop music is not important to them.

Do I care? Not really, since again this is not my generation and I often find there's not much I have in common with them. I do feel a little sorry for anyone who cannot muster the interest to listen to music, any music, new or old. I can't imagine that situation.

And I really can't identify with the people described in the article who have replaced music with podcasts. I can't imagine anything less interesting than a podcast. Listening to people talk is a gruesome experience for me and I avoid it as much as I can, which is pretty much all the time. I regularly mute baseball games when I watch - and never, NEVER, listen to podcasts.

Each week I look at the music magazines I follow, they cover different genres, and read about some new artist I've never heard of before, and check out their latest on Spotify. I often hear something I think is really good.

After reading this thread and that article I now know I have a lot to be grateful for.
 

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I suspect the original article concerned mostly pop music and young people's social interest in being up to date with the latest hits. They grow out of that and those who enjoy music probably become more discerning in their choices. It can be hard for them to be aware of what is truly worthwhile within music that is very new.
 

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I DON'T BELIEVE IT!
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And I don't use a translate. What made you think so?
The English expression 'lost in translation " does not refer to an internet translating site - it refers to the fact that most non-native English speakers tend to translate English text in their mid to their mother language. This phenomenon can easily lead to misunderstanding, in terms of actual content and/or context.
 
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