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. . . I am interested in exploring piano tuning as a career option and wonder if anyone here knows about it.
. . . Originally I was working with some piano maintenance, but it proved too difficult for me . . .
Some piano maintenance skill is going to be needed as you venture into a career of piano tuning. It goes with the occupation ... strings break and some other adjustments in the action will be necessary on certain instruments as part of the tuning visit.

You have the best two qualifications right from the get go ... pitch awareness and a good ear ... essential for a piano tuner, although most these days use some form of electronic gizmos to aid in their tuning processes. Although I have seen many a tuner adjust middle A to a tuning fork and go by ear from that point through the rest of the instrument.
 

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Hello,
Is it true that old pianos were tunned half a note lower, that what today sound as D sounded before as D#? I ask that because if that is true, the most of the classical pieces are supposed to sound half step lower.

Thank you
I've encountered this situation on old pianos ... the old tall uprights specifically ... I think you mean Db instead of D#.

The main reason I was given years ago that the tuning pins could not be tightened to hold enough, therefore they sounded one half step flat.

I haven't heard about classical pieces supposed to sound a half step lower. Various some symphony conductors do, however, alter tuning from A-440 either sharp or flat for a better overall sound. There are times that one half step higher sounds brighter in tone.

Kh :cool:
 
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