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The Seasons shall be revived as a ballet and not just as a symphonic work! I know it!

There is so much potential of choreography, plot, and visuals:

 

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I too would love to see a performance of The Seasons. The difficulty lies in programming it, I think: at around 35-40 minutes in total length, it doesn't really even make up half a programme. Perhaps if someone choreographed one or both of Glazunov's Concert Waltzes they could be added to make up half an evening's eventainment, but you'd still be well short of a full evening in the theatre.
 

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Last weekend I went to see Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for the first time. The first act was a little slow, but overall it was delightfully magical. Much better than I expected with beautiful costumes & sets and video images were nicely incorporated. I loved the humorous scenes, especially the 3rd act.

 

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Last weekend I went to see Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for the first time. The first act was a little slow, but overall it was delightfully magical. Much better than I expected with beautiful costumes & sets and video images were nicely incorporated. I loved the humorous scenes, especially the 3rd act.
I too have seen it live at the Royal Opera House. To be honest, however, I think it works even better on Blu-ray/DVD where camera close-ups make the striking visuals far more interesting. If you have already seen the Blu-ray/DVD, the theatrical performance can fall a little flat and seem something of an anticlimax.
 

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Roberto Bolle at his very best.
I don't know what the La Scala Tchaikovsky Gala looks like on DVD, but - unusually for BelAir Classiques whose Blu-ray discs are often technically superb - on Blu-ray it suffers very badly from the well-known juddering image effect. That's particularly in evidence whenever a camera tracks a soloist moving quickly and laterally across the stage while other dancers remain stationary in the background.

There are, as you say, some excellent Bolle performances here, though I don't think he does himself any favours by adopting an apparent de haut en bas attitude as he swans around the stage after the curtain call drinking champagne.
 

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Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake, Op. 20

Margot Fonteyn & Rudolf Nureyev

Wiener Symphoniker & Mitglieder des Balletts der Wiener Staatsoper, John Lanchbery

We had a wonderful evening watching this.
 
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Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake, Op. 20

Margot Fonteyn & Rudolf Nureyev

Wiener Symphoniker & Mitglieder des Balletts der Wiener Staatsoper, John Lanchbery

We had a wonderful evening watching this.
I have them doing R&J. That performance was actually released as a movie in theatres.

Next Saturday marks my return to live ballet. Because of some Covid-related scheduling adjustments and my screw-up on changing dates, I have to see Serenade twice this fall. Pity me. :)

On a semi-related note, has anyone else heard the Herold/Lanchberry recording of La Fille Mal Garde?

Font Rectangle Sleeve Book History


The vinyl has been on the TAS Super Disc list since I started reading it in the 80's. I got the CD as part of the Decca Analogue box. Worth tracking down.
 

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Please correct me if I'm wrong (I may well be!), but I thought that Lanchbery [with just one R, by the way] only recorded a disc of - admittedly substantial - excerpts of La fille mal gardée. The single-disc CD that I have (Decca 430 196-2) is billed as such and runs to just 50'46". A later Decca recording (430 849-2) featuring the National Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Richard Bonynge contains almost twice as much music (94'44") and so runs onto a second CD. Its completeness makes it, for me, the preferable purchase of the two, even though Lanchbery, as the original re-arranger of the score, has a strong claim on our interest.

Incidentally, the full Bonynge recording may also be found on the recent Decca set of his complete ballet recordings (485 0781) - a superb collection of 45 CDs at a competitive price. If that appeals, I'd order now as it's described as being a "limited edition".
 

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Please correct me if I'm wrong (I may well be!), but I thought that Lanchbery [with just one R, by the way] only recorded a disc of - admittedly substantial - excerpts of La fille mal gardée. The single-disc CD that I have (Decca 430 196-2) is billed as such and runs to just 50'46". A later Decca recording (430 849-2) featuring the National Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Richard Bonynge contains almost twice as much music (94'44") and so runs onto a second CD. Its completeness makes it, for me, the preferable purchase of the two, even though Lanchbery, as the original re-arranger of the score, has a strong claim on our interest.

Incidentally, the full Bonynge recording may also be found on the recent Decca set of his complete ballet recordings (485 0781) - a superb collection of 45 CDs at a competitive price. If that appeals, I'd order now as it's described as being a "limited edition".
It is a single LP-length recording. I'm away from home, so I can't check what else is on the CD. What makes it stand out is the incredibly natural sound. There appear to have been quite a number of audiophile releases over the years, but the version in the Decca analogue box satisfies my ears.
 

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It is a single LP-length recording. I'm away from home, so I can't check what else is on the CD. What makes it stand out is the incredibly natural sound. There appear to have been quite a number of audiophile releases over the years, but the version in the Decca analogue box satisfies my ears.
As I suspected, I wasn't quite correct in one respect in my original post. The 1983 recording of the score in full was actually performed, as it had been on the original 1960s excerpts disc, by John Lanchbery and the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. [As such, I'm afraid that it won't, after all, be found in that wonderful Bonynge complete ballets box set!] Mea culpa...

Meanwhile, I've been looking at copies of the original 1960s Lanchbery LP's cover as posted on Ebay, where the disc can be bought for from anything from £20 to £250 - though quite why the latter is so highly (over?)valued isn't explained! All of them are described as discs of excerpts. I think, therefore, that that was all that was issued at the time - probably because (1) as a new ballet (even if to old music), Decca weren't confident that there'd be a market for a complete recorded performance, (2) at a length of more than 90 minutes, a recording of the full-length ballet would have needed to be issued on two LPs, which would have both deterred any potential buyers whose interest in a new work was marginal and once again made the whole thing a dodgier commercial prospect from Decca's point of view.

Only by the early 1980s was it clear, I suspect, that LFMG had become a popular mainstay of the Royal Ballet's repertoire and that there was a market for a full recorded performance. While I agree that the sound of the 1960s analogue disc is excellent, the later 1980s digital recording trumps it, in my view, if only because it gives us the ballet in its complete form.
 

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As I suspected, I wasn't quite correct in one respect in my original post. The 1983 recording of the score in full was actually performed, as it had been on the original 1960s excerpts disc, by John Lanchbery and the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. [As such, I'm afraid that it won't, after all, be found in that wonderful Bonynge complete ballets box set!] Mea culpa...

Meanwhile, I've been looking at copies of the original 1960s Lanchbery LP's cover as posted on Ebay, where the disc can be bought for from anything from £20 to £250 - though quite why the latter is so highly (over?)valued isn't explained! All of them are described as discs of excerpts. I think, therefore, that that was all that was issued at the time - probably because (1) as a new ballet (even if to old music), Decca weren't confident that there'd be a market for a complete recorded performance, (2) at a length of more than 90 minutes, a recording of the full-length ballet would have needed to be issued on two LPs, which would have both deterred any potential buyers whose interest in a new work was marginal and once again made the whole thing a dodgier commercial prospect from Decca's point of view.

Only by the early 1980s was it clear, I suspect, that LFMG had become a popular mainstay of the Royal Ballet's repertoire and that there was a market for a full recorded performance. While I agree that the sound of the 1960s analogue disc is excellent, the later 1980s digital recording trumps it, in my view, if only because it gives us the ballet in its complete form.
It seems Decca has re-released the earlier La Fille on vinyl for $26. I got mine as part of the Decca Analogue box for 30 pounds at an HMV closeout sale. As it makes up half of one disc of the 50 disc set, I paid 30p for it. :D
 

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Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet, Op. 64

Carlos Acosta (Romeo) & Tamara Rojo (Juliet), José Martín (Mercutio) &
Thiago Soares (Tybalt)

Royal Ballet Sinfonia, Boris Gruzin

Watched this beauty last night .
 
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