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Sir, thank you very much. Could you recommend recordings of these pieces that you especially enjoy?
I'm not even sure whether they have been recorded more than once. My CD's:

Jan van Gilse - Symphony No. 3 "Erhebung" (CPO)
Alphons Diepenbrock - Im Grossen Schweigen (Chandos)
Hendrik Andriessen - Miroir de Peine (NM Classics)

The song cycle by Hendrik Andriessen is also available on a rare box with Live recordings by Elly Ameling (a 5 CD gem I picked up for 50 cents in a thrift shop).
 

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Since we have Dutch people contributing here, how about the greatest Dutch compositions to try?
Holland is famous for its painters, not for its composers ;)
There were plenty of them, of course (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Dutch_composers) But no composers that come close to the greatest, excepted Sweelinck.

Although, a masterpiece is the Allegro for four string quartets in D Major from Johannes Bernards van Bree (1801-1857). It could have been a Mendelssohn piece.

 

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A while ago I watched a video on Youtube of people visiting an abandoned villa in the Netherlands (Video about the villa.) That turned out to be the house of the late composer Henk Badings (died in de 80s). As a result of that video I listened to his music and I loved some pieces.

YouTube suggested this Quintet for wind instruments in A major from Johannes Meinardus Coenen (never heard about). Very beautiful music!

 

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Dohnanyi - Piano Quintet no. 2 in E flat minor, op. 26 (Schubert Ensemble of London)
Froberger - Lamentation on the Death of Ferdinand III, FbWV 633 (Leonhardt)
Hummel - Piano Trio no. 6 in E flat major, op. 93 (Trio Parnassus)
 

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Since we have Dutch people contributing here, how about the greatest Dutch compositions to try?
I found this, a YouTube channel with music from Dutch composers: https://www.youtube.com/user/nichtschleppen/videos

For example the violin concerto from Elisabeth Kuyper (Bruch conducted the premiere!!). Nice music. Very bad performance unfortunately. Janine Jansen should record this work together with the Joachim concerto.
 

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Thanks so much! Could you name 2-3 specific recordings that are your favorites?
Escher: Concerto for string orchestra, Musique pour l'esprit en Deuil
Röntgen: Cello Cto no 3, Cello Sonatas op 41 and 56
Schenk: Les Fantaisies bizarres de la Goutte, Scherzi musicali
Sweelinck: Complete Keyboard Works, Canciones Sacrae
Vermeulen: Symphonies 2, 6 and 7
Adriaansz: Triple Concerto for 8 Musicians, Environments I-III, Attachments I-III
Simeon ten Holt: Canto ostinato, Lemniscaat, Meandres
Louis Andriessen: De Staat, De Tijd, De Materie
Michel van der Aa: Up-Close, Hysteresis, Here to be found
 

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Louis Moreau Gottschalk: Night in the Tropics
This one so very much. 15 minutes of pure fun that will make you jump from your chair and dance.

I'm not Dutch, but the CPO series of music by Julius Rontgen has been astonishing. Extremely well written, beautifully scored, great tunes, luscious harmony...it's all been soooo good.
Röntgen has long been regarded as an epigone, back in the days when Dutch music that wasn't avant-garde agitprop was casually dismissed.
Slowly he seems to be gaining a better reputation, but the majority of his symphonies are still waiting for their first recordings. He was such a weird character, starting as a friend of Grieg, writing lush romantic music, and ending as a wild experimentator, who wrote tons of music in the last 3 years of his life, including about 20(!) symphonies.

As for my suggestions:

1. Joseph Marx: Eine Herbstsinfonie
Talking about lush and romantic. A big and bold orchestral extravaganza, in need of some top-class performances (Botstein is merely ok).

2. Franz Schmidt: Piano Concerto for the left hand
Much less well-known than the 4 symphonies. Written for Wittgenstein (of course), but completely different from the Ravel, Strauss and Prokofiev concerti. Schmidt is much more neoclassical and often treats the solo part as a single line, clear and sharp.
The Beethoven Variations, also for piano left hand and orchestra are great as well.

3. Wolf: Penthelisea
Wolf's only work for large orchestra, and what a work it is. Completely over the top, but enjoyable from start to finish. Strangely neglected on record. I remember it being the filler on a 2 LP DG set with Kubelik's Mahler 9 as the main course. Conducted by Otto Gerdes, a great performance. I think Barenboim with the Orchestre de Paris is the only other option.

(EDIT: I see there are two more listed at discogs: Osmar Suitner/Staatskapelle Berlin and Horst Stein/Orch. de la Suisse Romande)
 

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George Benjamin - Dream of the Song
Ginastera - Harp Concerto
Karayev - In The Path of Thunder
 
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Reichardt - Erwin und Elmire (1793, Berlin)
Act I. Aria. Ein Schauspiel für Götter

"Much of Reichardt's reputation as a composer rests on his Lieder that number about 1500, using texts by some 125 poets. Important among these are the settings of Goethe's texts, some of which were known to, and influenced, Schubert. He was also known by his Singspiele, a genre that he refined with Goethe's support."
Act II. Aria. Welch ein Lispen, welch ein Schauer

"Mendelssohn regarded Reichardt as a major figure in developing the lied, valuing him over his teacher Zelter, and even above Schubert, because he had written, after all, some 1,500 songs over his sixty-two years."
-James Porter (Beyond Fingal's Cave: Ossian in the Musical Imagination, P. 143)
Act II. Aria. Ihr verblühet, süße Rosen
Act I. Trio. Ich muß, ich muß ihn sehen
Act I. Aria. Erwin! O schau, du wirst gerochen​
 
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