Classical Music Forum banner
1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Relatively, I am new to classical music in general, as I only really started listening seriously a year ago.
I have only come across two or three pieces from ballet's, would anybody be ale to suggest some good pieces/composers/ballets to explore?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,359 Posts
Welcome on TC: I think ballet music is a great entrance to classical music. I myself am hooked on Russian composers like Prokofiev & Tchaikovsky, but also Delibes - Lakmé or Adam - Giselle are wonderful for repeated listening. I'm a typical listener who hardly ever sits down to watch ballet on a big screen, but perhaps your taste is different. Happy New Year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Without a doubt, for a 'first time' ballet, I would have to say -

Coppélia

I have escorted groups of high-schoolers, who told me they would rather die than listen to classical music, to performances of this ballet and watched then sit entranced throughout.

Nothing too complex or subtle, just lots of superb music and a simple story that even the youngest can understand.

Best wishes
Metairie Road
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,785 Posts
While they were not intended as ballets, Tchaikovsky's 4 Suites for Orchestra have been choreographed many times because they are almost as balletic as his big 3 ballets. Try the 4th Suite - Mozartiana to begin with. Some ballet music which is perfect for dancing, is a bit less perfect for concert listening, but that tends to be a very personal opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
While they were not intended as ballets, Tchaikovsky's 4 Suites for Orchestra have been choreographed many times because they are almost as balletic as his big 3 ballets. Try the 4th Suite - Mozartiana to begin with. Some ballet music which is perfect for dancing, is a bit less perfect for concert listening, but that tends to be a very personal opinion.
Another work not originally created for ballet, but serving as the basis for two dance masterpieces is Mendelssohn's Overture and Incidental Music for "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,116 Posts
"Judith" by William Schuman:

https://play.spotify.com/track/5IC8Ygk63CSSoQZLDjJXXq

Bleak, often intricate, and would be interesting to see someone dance it, though honestly I don't see a difference between that ballet and his late symphonies, other than that they are called different things.

The sound world is polychordal and basically atonal, but the music doesn't strike me as terribly chromatic compared with something like late Schoenberg. I think it's a good gate-way drug to more avant-garde stuff. And I think Schuman has a sound of his own, qualifying him as great in my book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
I also find that full scores are not ideal for listening, but my main interest is orchestral music, so ballet fanatics might differ! That said, I find some ballet music to be essential listening. One approach, is to listen to extended highlights. Make sure to seek out good performances. Tchaikovsky:Sleeping Beauty conducted by Ermler, Royal opera House Covent Garden orchestra is a favourite of mine:

Human body Poster Organism Font Musical instrument
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
Another work not originally created for ballet, but serving as the basis for two dance masterpieces is Mendelssohn's Overture and Incidental Music for "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
A great highlights disk of that, with his third symphony, is Maag conducting the LSO:

Coat Font Musical instrument Poster Baton


The third symphony is easy, beautiful, music which sits well beside the "ballet" music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
...and which was used by George Balanchine for his 1952 ballet Scotch Symphony
Truly Balanchine could "see the music" like no one else. It's a shame so little of his work has been captured on video. I have the 1970's Dance in America programs of his work on DVD (one of which may be out of sync in whole or in part). I also have the much more recent Paris Opera Ballet video of Balanchine's "Jewels," which uses wonderful music by Faure, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky (although the dancing does not match the best I've seen at City Ballet).
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top