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Try scales, chords and arpeggios in only one key per day, many repetitions, maybe 5-10 minutes a day. Or maybe even one key per week at 5-10 minutes per day. Your hands will learn the patterns if you repeat the same ones in a focused way.
So 5-10 minutes a day should be sufficient if i stick to it daily? I'm just starting to really focus on scales and I was curious what a good amount of time would be. I have been playing for a while but I've never really played pieces that required runs of scales. I just stick to stuff like ragtime and easy Chopin pieces with only short runs here and there. But I'm wanting to learn some Mozart so I've started on K 545. The constant runs are a new thing for me so I'm trying to figure out how to get them right. And also should I practice at a much slower tempo at first and then gradually increase? I think the piece is around 125 bpm but I can only play the scales somewhat smooth at around 90.

Also if anyone knows of any good Youtube instruction or books that help with good technique and finger/hand/wrist movement, that'd be nice. I had a piano teacher before for only a month or two and he told me I played my scales too much "with my fingers". The concept of playing completely fluid and tension-free is so hard to understand and translate to my playing.
 

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Have you heard of/considered Hannon? That book was very helpful to me.

http://www.hanon-online.com/

There are scales, arpeggios, and various other finger exercises.
Yes I have this book although I haven't looked at it in a while. But the best I remember doesn't it just focus on giving you the notes to play rather than telling you how to control your elbow/wrist/fingers in a smooth and tension free way?

I may just have to eventually get a teacher, even if it is only for the 30 minute session just so I can get some hands-on technique work. I wouldn't even be that worried about repertoire work until I got technique down rock solid.
 

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Yes I have this book although I haven't looked at it in a while. But the best I remember doesn't it just focus on giving you the notes to play rather than telling you how to control your elbow/wrist/fingers in a smooth and tension free way?
You're absolutely correct. It's just drills, drills, drills. I hadn't read the latter part of this thread yet but I will have to keep an eye out. My left hand has always been so much more clumsy than my right :p
 

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very helpful! I was taught to play both hands once octave apart for 4 octaves, major, and harmonic, melodic minors. Put emphasis on every second key for 4 octaves, than 3rd key, then 4th, etc. until the 7th, which helps for even sound. Also do octaves, 6ths, 3rds like the idea of broken 3rds,

have not used contrary motion regularly. I have integrated arpeggios since it really helps stretch. Have just noticed I have a weakness in my left hand, 3rd, 4th, 5th finger, so working on an exercise to strengthen coordination and strength there.

Sometimes, I listen to you tube while I practice these. The exercises take about 1 and 1/2 hours. I take a particular key each day, does not really matter which, octaves, 3rds, 6ths, in that particular key . And some various exercises to focus on my weaknesses. Use trills in "the key of the day. " I usually go through the number of flats, like will do c, F, B flat, E flat, etc, up to 6 flats, and then sharps.
 
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