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Is quickly becoming my favorite genre to listen to. I would love to hear some recommendations on noteworthy works to check out, and particular versions if you have a suggestion.

I'll start with Bettina's favorite, Beethoven's SQ no 14:

 

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Beethoven, Quartet Opus 127 (Yale Quartet)
Brahms: Sextet No. 1 (Berlin Phil. Octet)
Brahms: Sextet No. 2 (Music from Marlboro)
Mendelssohn: Octet (Marlboro)
Schumann: Piano Quintet (no particular favorite)
Schubert: Quintet in C (lots of good performances)
Debussy/Ravel String Quartets (a common pairing, lots of choices)
Faure: Piano Quartets (I had the old Vox Box, still good)
Mozart: Wind Serenade in c minor
Spohr: Piano/Wind Quintet in E-flat
Vaughan Williams: On Wenlock Edge (song cycle w/chamber ensemble)
Bartok: String Quartets (take your pick)
Wagner: Piano Quntet on Tunes from Meyerbeer (just joking)
Nielsen: String Quartet No. 4
Debussy: Sonata for Flute, Harp and Viola
Ives: Violin Sonatas
Janacek: "Mladi" (wind sextet)
Smetana: "From My Life" (string quartet in e minor (I think))

enough for now?
 

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My absolute favorite piece of music is Beethoven's Opus 131, string quartet #14.

I've heard some fantastic interpretations, but my go-to recording (and for all of the late and middle quartets, for that matter) is the Takács Quartet. Their interpretation, to my ears, is that of tenacity without sacrificing any of the emotion or depth. I also enjoy the Italiano Quartet's Opus 131, but sometimes I feel the piece's edges are softened. It's too "pretty" sometimes, and pretty isn't really what comes to mind when I think of my favorite body of music, Beethoven's late quartets. These pieces are bizarre, rough, strange, esoteric, whimsical, ethereal, beautiful, and profound. For this reason, I go with the Takács. It's a well-rounded interpretation that gets to the essence and core of the music.

 

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Mod - could this be moved to the chamber sub-forum?
 

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Mod - could this be moved to the chamber sub-forum?
Your wish is my command. :tiphat:

also:

Anton Webern
Two Pieces for Cello and Piano (1899)
Langsamer Satz for string quartet (1905)
String Quartet (1905)
Five Movements for String Quartet, op. 5 (1909)
Six Bagatelles for String Quartet, op. 9 (1911-13)
Sonata for Cello and Piano (1914)
Three Small Pieces for Cello and Piano, op. 11 (1914)
String Quartet, op. 28

Gyorgy Kurtag
String Quartet, Op. 1, 1959.
Jelek ["Signs"], Op. 5 (viola), 1961, rev. 1992.
Jelek, Op. 5b (cello), 1961-99
Hommage à Mihály András - 12 Microludes, Op. 13 (string quartet) (1977-8)
… quasi una fantasia…, Op. 27/1 (piano, cello, and 2 chamber ensembles), 1987-88.
Officium breve in memoriam Andreae Szervánszky (string quartet) - (1988-9)
Ligatura: Message to Frances-Marie (The Answered Unanswered Question), Op. 31b, (cello [2 bows]/2 cellos, 2 violins, and celesta), 1989.
Jelek, játékok és ü:zenetek ["Signs, Games, and Messages"] (violin, viola, cello, and double bass, in various combinations), 1989-.
6 Moments musicaux, (string quartet) (2005)

are some favourite chamber works of mine.
 

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The Schubert Quintet in C is the most beautiful piece of music I know.

I've posted elsewhere but my two favorite recordings are the Alban Berg Quartet with Schiff and the Casals/Stern et al recording from the early 50's ('52 or '53).
 

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I am foremost a chamber music fans. String quartet is my favorite, especially those come from the Classical era. As I am delved into the flute world, I begin listening flute chamber music since late 2015.

Fesca's Flute Quartet
 

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I am foremost a chamber music fans. String quartet is my favorite, especially those come from the Classical era. As I am delved into the flute world, I begin listening flute chamber music since late 2015.

Fesca's Flute Quartet
For me it's the clarinet, which I play for my own amusement (or frustration). For clarinet aficionados, two composers stand out: Mozart and Brahms. Between them, they wrote arguably 7 of the 9 best known works that feature the clarinet, and all but one are chamber music:

Mozart
Quintet for clarinet and strings
Trio for clarinet, viola and piano
(Plus a concerto for clarinet that has much of the appeal of chamber music)

Brahms
Quintet for clarinet and strings
Trio for clarinet, cello and piano
Two sonatas for clarinet and piano

Perhaps start with the two quintets. (The Mozart quintet became well known in the U.S. when it was featured in the final episode of the American TV series "MASH.")

You can look for recordings by Karl Leister, Martin Frost and Sabine Meyer among others.

The other two clarinet works that I think equal those of Mozart and Brahms are Schubert's octet (not generally thought of as a work for clarinet per se, but it's a great work with wonderful writing for the instrument) and Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time," which deserves a post of its own.
 

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At least one book has been written about the history of Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time." Alex Ross, classical music critic for the New Yorker, wrote an article about it that begins as follows:

"The most ethereally beautiful music of the twentieth century was first heard on a brutally cold January night in 1941, at the Stalag VIIIA prisoner-of-war camp, in Görlitz, Germany. The composer was Olivier Messiaen, the work "Quartet for the End of Time." Messiaen wrote most of it after being captured as a French soldier during the German invasion of 1940. The première took place in an unheated space in Barrack 27. A fellow-inmate drew up a program in Art Nouveau style, to which an official stamp was affixed: "Stalag VIIIA 49 geprüft [approved]." Sitting in the front row-and shivering along with the prisoners-were the German officers of the camp."

http://www.therestisnoise.com/2004/04/quartet_for_the_2.html

 

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Best starter list:
Complete Beethoven string quartets (the 10th is my favourite)
Schubert: String quartets 13, 14, 15 and the Quintet in C Major
Ravel: String quartet in F Major
Dvorak: American quartet
Borodin: String quartets 1 and 2
Mozart: Clarinet Quintet and the Quartets dedicated to Haydn
Brahms: Clarinet Quintet and Piano trio no.1
 

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Nice theads these of the string quartets, alway something new pops up.
I listen mostly to chamber music and instrumental concerts and for me the "base" of
string quartets are Beethoven, they are masterly and on that time they where modern.
I´m also a big fan of Shostakovich music so I must propose the quartets from him.
But recently I´ve been listening a lot to Griegs string quartet Opus 27 which I fall in love to, I streamed all of them to compare,
but the Emerson quartet on Deutsche gramophone is the one in my ears, the quartet itself is very romantic and with a lot
of influences from scandinavian ( or Norwegian) folksongs, it´s the number one record for me this month.

Water Ecoregion Natural landscape Sky Font
 

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Is quickly becoming my favorite genre to listen to. I would love to hear some recommendations on noteworthy works to check out, and particular versions if you have a suggestion.

I'll start with Bettina's favorite, Beethoven's SQ no 14:

Op 131 is a piece of music I've tried to get to know better through listening to lots of different performances. There are several recorded performances which mean a lot to me, with music of this calibre, where the most imaginative quartets have given their best, it's not surprising that there are a lot of very stimulating CDs. One is a very early one from the Calvert String Quartet, maybe the first ever recording. Others I think are really exceptional are the first Juilliard, on Testament; The Vlach Quartet; The Smetana Quartet's second recording on Denon; The Peterson Quartet; The Ébène Quartet.
 

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Op 131 is a piece of music I've tried to get to know better through listening to lots of different performances. There are several recorded performances which mean a lot to me, with music of this calibre, where the most imaginative quartets have given their best, it's not surprising that there are a lot of very stimulating CDs. One is a very early one from the Calvert String Quartet, maybe the first ever recording. Others I think are really exceptional are the first Juilliard, on Testament; The Vlach Quartet; The Smetana Quartet's second recording on Denon; The Peterson Quartet; The Ébène Quartet.
Ever heard this one? The second short second movement is divine in full orchestration and you can tell Bernstein agrees:

 
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