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I suppose the artists can choose to include or exclude what they please with the dance. It seems the only one immune from this is the guitar line, which is the one most discussed on forums. I have no doubt that people in Spain continue this tradition without the dance part but I think the trio (dance, voice and guitar, or quartet if you include the claps) makes a wholesome experience. In 2010 flamenco reached World Heritage Treasure status thanks to the very reflection it does to Spanish art and culture. (In case if anyone is wondering, I am not of Spanish descent in any way).

 

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Niño Marchena - Fiesta de Romería (Aires de los Romeros de Alamonte)


José Tejada Martín. Marchena (Seville), 1903 - Seville, 1976. Singer. He called himself Niño de Marchena at the beginning of his career. He was the main protagonist of the stage of the Flamenco Opera, given the afandangados styles.

From a very humble family, in which there were no artistic precedents, although the father was intoned well with malagueñas and soleares. At the age of seven, that child prodigy was already astonished and at twelve or fourteen he would walk through the taverns of Marchena and other surrounding towns making his little songs in exchange for a few coins. In 1920, he was already established in Madrid as a figure of cante with new ways and in which a great future was presumed. In addition to fandangos, he stood out in genres such as the airs from America, the cantes from Malaga and the miner-Levantines.

Falsetto and watermarks were characteristic of Marchena's cante, which was described as "pretty" due to its precious qualities. He took personal creation to its last consequences, introducing recitations in cante and inventing unprecedented stylistic crossovers. His cante had and still has followers, although no less detractors. He left an extensive discography and made numerous films.
 

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Discussion Starter · #211 · (Edited)
Been a while since I posted here bu I see San Antone has been keeping the flame alive. Here is a clip of what I call "Brazilian mode" Bulerias, a more modern, softer sound than the harder, driven Bulerias of the past like Terremoto or La Paquera might sing. But this clip features a favorite of mine, Estrella Morente, singing, and the Habichuelas on guiters--a real juerga atmosphere.

 

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Been a while since I posted here bu I see San Antone has been keeping the flame alive. Here is a clip of what I call "Brazilian mode" Bulerias, a more modern, softer sound than the harder, driven Bulerias of the past like Terremoto or La Paquera might sing. But this clip features a favorite of mine, Estrella Morente, singing, and the Habichuelas on guiters--a real juerga atmosphere.
Fabulous clip! Estrella Morente, Juan Habichuela, Pepe Habichuela, Isabel la Golondrina and Aurora Carbonell - all fantastic but the ones I've bolded are especially noteworthy.

This is one of my favorite TC threads. :tiphat:
 

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Cante Jondo: El Cante Profundo de Andalucía


Cante jondo (Andalusian Spanish: [ˈkãnte ˈhõndo]) is a vocal style in flamenco, an unspoiled form of Andalusian folk music. The name means "deep song" in Spanish, with hondo ("deep") spelled with J. It is generally considered that the common traditional classification of flamenco music is divided into three groups of which the deepest, most serious forms are known as cante jondo. (Wikipedia)
 

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Discussion Starter · #215 ·
^^^^Rafael Romero--one of the 5 male cantaores who accompany me to my desert island, along with my 5 cantaoras. A most consistently interesting and reliable singer with a long career working with the Pericos, father and son.
 

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Discussion Starter · #216 ·
San Antone:[/
Cante jondo (Andalusian Spanish: [ˈkãnte ˈhõndo]) is a vocal style in flamenco, an unspoiled form of Andalusian folk music. The name means "deep song" in Spanish, with hondo ("deep") spelled with J. It is generally considered that the common traditional classification of flamenco music is divided into three groups of which the deepest, most serious forms are known as cante jondo. (Wikipedia)
I first saw the division into three parts in Donn Pohren's Art of Flamenco where he divides into Jondo, Intermedio, and Chico..I wonder where the division is first mentioned or whether it originated with Pohren.
 
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