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To which composer(s) belong(s) your three favorite fugues?

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Bach of course: the Kyrie of the B minor Mass, the six part fugue from the Musical Offering, and Contrapunctus 3 from AoF. Not to mention the B flat major and minor fugues from WTC II, the B major and minor fugues from WTC I and on and on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I know why Bernstein is there... let me say I think this is quite childish and for that reason I'm not gonna answer this poll. I also don't feel the need to "test Bach's supremacy" as that is history also confirmed by competend scholars and composers.
This is a poll. There are polls of all kinds around here, and I see no harm in making one about fugues. You participate if you wish, of course.

Bernstein said that Beethoven never wrote a good fugue, so I assume that he must have better ones and, considering that Beethoven has a single option for him here, I think that it's fair that Bernstein also have one. He is a composer after all, and I don't know why his presence in the poll should be a problem.

Well in the field of counterpoint there's simply no competition. Although this being an internet forum there will no doubt be naysayers.
If the talking is just about counterpoint and nothing else (not fugues), then I think that J.S. Bach has competition from the Renaissance masters such as Palestrina, Tallis, Josquin, Victoria and others.
 

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Bernstein said that Beethoven never wrote a good fugue, so I assume that he must have better ones and, considering that Beethoven has a single option for him here, I think that it's fair that Bernstein also have one. He is a composer after all, and I don't know why his presence in the poll should be a problem.
No comment. Do not expect any other replies from me. I'm not gonna push this further, as in the Haydn's vs Mozart's symphonies thread you have clearly completely misunderstood my words as an attack on Beethoven (which is one of my and Bernstein's favourite composers...) and that is the reason of this poll's existence. Goodbye.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Umm...........
No, not really.
Well, to each their own, but I think that there's a reason for the Renaissance to be called The Golden Age of Polyphony. This said, I of course acknowledge Bach's genius for counterpoint, and it's no surprise to me that he is leading this poll (I voted for him here by the way).

No comment. Do not expect any other replies from me. I'm not gonna push this further, as in the Haydn's vs Mozart's symphonies thread you have clearly completely misunderstood my words as an attack on Beethoven (which is one of my and Bernstein's favourite composers...) and that is the reason of this poll's existence. Goodbye.
I think that your response to our little disagreement is being a bit disproportional and exaggerated. But you do as you wish. I suggest you to not get too personal in discussions such as this, and apologize if my defense of Beethoven annoyed you somehow.
 

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Beethoven.
Bach might have my 30 favorite fugues as fugues. But Beethoven has a few pieces that happen to be fugal and I prefer them clearly to even my favorite dozen or so of Bach fugues: op.133, op.131,i, op.106,iv would be my 3 favourite instrumental, then op.110, finale and the two great vocal ones (in "vitam venturi saeculi" and in "gloria dei patris" from op.123. Of course there are lots of other good ones, two in the Diabellis, the variations op.35, op.102 etc., the C major mass, but I don't rate them as highly,
 

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I have 3.5 recordings of the DSCH P&F but I am a bit on the edge here. After Bach and Beethoven, it would probably be Brahms (Handel variations, 1st cello sonata, vocal music), Handel or assorted single/singular movements, such as the first of Bartok's music for strings, percussion etc., Mozart's c minor for strings, Mendelssohn e minor P&F, maybe Schumann (although my favorite polylphonic Schumann is the canonical studies for pedal piano, technically not fugues, as they manage to sound as "natural" as Bach (and not like striving hard to imitate Bach or Handel or just striving).
 

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I love a great deal of Renaissance composers who composed highly contrapuntal music that in many regards anticipated the fugue (especially the Fantasia and Ricercare genres that were the fugue's direct ancestors). But if we include only the fugue proper, then I think it would be Bach and Shostakovich. But I also have to mention Beethoven and his Große Fuge!

Which fugues by them exactly? That's a much harder question. Sometimes it comes down to my mood.
 
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