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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any way to type an accent on my English keyboard when making posts here on Talk Classical?

I just posted on the current listening thread that I listened to Faure and Saint Saens. I'd like to spell their names properly. I found, doing an online search, how to do this while typing in MS Word, but not here on a forum.

Is this even possible?

I usually make posts on my laptop (not an apple product). I don't have a numeric keyboard on the right side.

I know how to type an accent on my iPad, but I don't usually write posts here using the iPad, it's small and tedious to add images.

While we're at it, is it possible to type Dvorak correctly here on TC on an English keyboard?
 

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At least on my Mac, I can go to System Preferences/Keyboards and install various international keyboards, which are accessed from the top right corner of the screen. For example, if I want to type Dvořák, I switch to the Czech keyboard and use where the numbers usually would be to type in the diacriticals. My default keyboard is also ABC Extended, which allows for shortcuts such as ü, ū, ú, etc. Don’t know if other computers work the same way, but it might help.
 

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Bit tedious, but have a look at character map This is available for most versions of Windows in current use. It's a bit slow to select characters with the mouse, but you can either select individual special characters or in the case of Dvořák build up a complete word and copy it. If you've got Windows 10 with the extended clipboard, you can have a range of characters stored for re-use.
 

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On my Mac, if I hold down the, "A" key, I get a pop-up menu of eight different accents. It works for various accents on "C", "E", "I", "L", "N", "O", "S", "U", "Y" and "Z".

I find that it sometimes stops working but when I restart, the function returns.

It's still no help with Dvořák though. :lol:
 

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I just copy and paste after googling - it doesn't take more than a few seconds. I know how to access the diacritic options on my phone but can't be bothered to find out how to do it on the laptop.
 

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á í é ó ú are easy, hold down "Alt Gr" key and hit the relevant letter key otherwise use the character map linked by Taggart above.
 

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I use a Mac, and there are several letter modifiers I use that are easy to remember:

Type [option] e, then e, and you'll get an é, and it works with any letter that needs one.

Type [option] e, then a, and you'll get an á.

The other vowels have "extra" characters that you can piggyback:

Type [option] u, and you get an umlaut: [option] u + u = ü

Type [option] i + i and you get î. I can't even remember what that is called.

The letter "ç" pops up with an [option] c; no addition keystroke needed.

Oh, and you can make a tilde this way as well: [Option] n + n = ñ.

The other blog I frequent doesn't recognize these "special" letters, but this one does. Probably just a simple admin setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That is my preferred option.

If for some reason you have problems with copy/paste (I can't get the hang of it when I am on my tablet), you can use alt codes.(link).
The alt codes work when you have a numeric keyboard on the right side. Or you can use the function key (fn) and the num lock button. I don't have a num lock button on my Lenovo laptop.

I too can't get the hang of cut and paste on my tablet (iPad), but I can cut and paste on my laptop.

Bit tedious, but have a look at character map This is available for most versions of Windows in current use. It's a bit slow to select characters with the mouse, but you can either select individual special characters or in the case of Dvořák build up a complete word and copy it. If you've got Windows 10 with the extended clipboard, you can have a range of characters stored for re-use.
I have pinned the character map to the taskbar at the bottom.

One option is to find the word already accented on a web page and then copy and paste it here.
A good option.
á í é ó ú are easy, hold down the "Alt Gr" key and hit the relevant letter key otherwise use the character map linked by Taggart above.
I don't have an "Alt Gr" key.

I had a quick look through my CDs, and here are my results experimenting with the character map:

Fauré
Saint-Saëns
Bartók
Eötvös
Dvořák
Górecki
Saga-drøm (Music by Nielsen)
Schönberg
Alfvén
Janáček
Pärt

It is a bit tedious, but overall not too prohibitively so.

Parenthetically, the forecast here is to reach about 35 °C

Thanks for your help.
 

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Problem with quick reply box, the area above for selecting fonts, links image, video, quote etc is mostly blank, but hovering cursor over the area shows a lighter grey square, with function in text below; "Go advanced" only has font options.
 

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Badly inconvenient for me too, as I type half a dozen hyphenated languages.

My least bad solution up to now, less inconvenient than all the software tools I tried: I wrote a text file with the letters I need, and I copy-paste them. Joined here:

The efficient solution would be to learn all needed alt-NNN combinations. Too lazy.

Some keyboards are better.
The old French Azerty is bad even for French: no diacritics on capital letters, no Umlaut.
The newer French "Azerty amélioré" or "Azerty+"is reportedly better: it has diacritics separated from the carrying letters.
The German Quertz can type Spanish and French except few letters.
If you find a hyphenated Querty (called "US international", but that's too vague), it is meant for hyphenated Latin letters.
The Linux community has designed a (Latin) keyboard. Meant first for programming, but they gave a thought to hyphenated Latin scripts.

One can also take any keyboard, put stickers on the keys, and either install a driver that corresponds to the stickers or reprogram the keys using existing software.

I thought only at West European languages with Latin script. Kyrillic, East European languages, Ethiopian languages, Arabic, Asian languages... are a completely different endeavour.
 
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